James Patterson by James Patterson The stories of my life

James Patterson, 1947-

Large print - 2022

A #1 best-selling author shows how a boy from small-town New York made it to literary stardom.

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LARGE PRINT/BIOGRAPHY/Patterson, James
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Location Call Number   Status
1st Floor New Large Print Shelf LARGE PRINT/BIOGRAPHY/Patterson, James (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 18, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Autobiographies
Published
New York, NY : Little, Brown and Company 2022.
Edition
Large print edition. First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
459 pages (large print) ; 21 cm
ISBN
9780316445214
0316445215
Main Author
James Patterson, 1947- (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

In Patterson's own words, this is an "ego-biography," a collection of stories about his life. He talks about his time working in a psychiatric hospital (where his desire to write was born); his career in advertising; his relationship with Hollywood (he doesn't like any of the movies based on his books); his love of writing nonfiction and books for younger readers; the pain of finding out that his sixth-grade crush had died in her early twenties; and much more. His writing style, as in his novels, is conversational, a string of short chapters. Taken together, they paint a picture of the man behind the bestsellers. Along the way, we learn that he outlines rigorously and can barely read his own handwriting; also that Alex Cross, Patterson's most famous character, started out as Alexis. He also discusses the process he uses when working with his many coauthors (yes, he knows he gets a lot of flack for using cowriters, and, no, he doesn't care). Readers will emerge knowing a lot more about Patterson than they did before, and that seems to be what an ego-biography is all about. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

In Also a Poet, New York Times best-selling author Calhoun blends literary history and memoir, examining her relationship with her father, art critic and poet Peter Schjeldahl, and their shared passion for Frank O'Hara's work as she draws on taped interviews he conducted for a never-completed biography of O'Hara. In Somewhere We Are Human, distinguished writers/activists Grande and Guiñansaca compile 44 essays, poems, and artworks by migrants, refugees, and Dreamers that help clarify the lives of those who are undocumented. Featuring a selection of letters exchanged by Ernest Hemingway and his son Patrick over two decades, Dear Papa was edited by Patrick Hemingway's nephew Brendan Hemingway and his grandson Stephen Adams (40,000-copy first printing). Winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize, Horn's Voice of the Fish uses fish, water, and mythic imagery to illuminate the trans experience, with travels through Russia and a devastating injury the author suffered as backdrop. Former deputy editor of The New Yorker and former editor of the New York Times Book Review, McGrath looks back on childhood summers as both joyous memory and obvious idealization in The Summer Friend, also considering a close friendship with someone from a very different background. Starting out with his nearly dying on the day he was born, the world's best-selling novelist has some amazing stories to tell in James Patterson by James Patterson (250,000-copy first printing). Having probed the lives of Mary Shelley and Annabella Milbanke and Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's wife and daughter, acclaimed biographer Seymour takes on Jean Rhys, the celebrated author of Wide Sargasso Sea in I Used to Live Here Once. Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

"This is a book of true stories the way I remember them. I'm sure I'll get a few things wrong," suggests the mega-bestselling novelist in this blithe blend of personal asides, fan trivia, and hot takes. The dozens of sections skim the major stages of Patterson's life, including his childhood in Newburgh, N.Y., his early love of reading, his aspirations to become a writer, his time in the advertising industry (where he claims to have coined the slogan "I'm a Toys ‘R' Us Kid"), and his astonishing commercial success as a novelist. As Patterson makes crystal clear, readers in search of a straightforward and detailed autobiography won't find it here ("Robert Caro or Walter Isaacson, I'm not")—but they'll get the lowdown on his first kiss (name, Veronica Tabasco), insights into his craft, and colorful accounts of the many celebrities he's crossed paths with, among them Hugh Jackman and Charlize Theron, both of whom "look amazing in real life. Also, they don't seem full of themselves." Occasionally, Patterson's jocular style feels at odds with his material, as when he glibly weighs in on the U.S.'s systemic problems: "It isn't white, Black, or brown... it's jerks." Still, this uncut look into the famed author's mind is sure to intrigue his many fans—and critics.(June) Copyright 2022 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A #1 best-selling author shows how a boy from small-town New York made it to literary stardom.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

“It's quite a life, Patterson's, and this fizzing, funny, often deeply moving memoir is a perfect way to understand the dizzying world of a best-selling writer." —Daily Mail  “Damn near addictive. I loved it . . . that Patterson guy can write!” –Ron HowardTHE INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER—How did a kid whose dad lived in the poorhouse become the most successful storyteller in the world? On the morning he was born, he nearly died. His dad grew up in the Pogey– the Newburgh, New York, poorhouse. He worked at a mental hospital in Massachusetts, where he met the singer James Taylor and the poet Robert Lowell.   While he toiled in advertising hell, James wrote the ad jingle line “I’m a Toys ‘R’ Us Kid.” He once watched James Baldwin and Norman Mailer square off to trade punches at a party. He’s only been in love twice.  Both times are amazing. Dolly Parton once sang “Happy Birthday” to James over the phone.  She calls him J.J., for Jimmy James.  How did a boy from small-town New York become the world’s most successful writer? How does he do it? He has always wanted to write the kind of novel that would be read and reread so many times that the binding breaks and the book literally falls apart. As he says, “I’m still working on that one.” James Patterson by James Patterson is the most anticipated memoir of 2022.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

How did a kid whose dad lived in the poorhouse become the most successful storyteller in the world?·         On the morning he was born, he nearly died. ·         Growing up, he didn’t love to read.  That changed.·         He worked at a mental hospital in Massachusetts, where he met the singer James Taylor and the poet Robert Lowell.  ·         While he toiled in advertising hell, James wrote the ad jingle line “I’m a Toys ‘R’ Us Kid.”·         He once watched James Baldwin and Norman Mailer square off to trade punches at a party.·         He’s only been in love twice.  Both times are amazing.·         Dolly Parton once sang “Happy Birthday” to James over the phone.  She calls him J.J., for Jimmy James. ·         Three American presidents have invited him to golf with them. How did a boy from small-town New York become the world’s most successful writer? How does he do it? He has always wanted to write the kind of novel that would be read and reread so many times that the binding breaks and the book literally falls apart. As he says, “I’m still working on that one.” James Patterson by James Patterson is the most anticipated memoir of 2022.