An immense world How animal senses reveal the hidden realms around us

Ed Yong

Book - 2022

"The Earth teems with sights and textures, sounds and vibrations, smells and tastes, electric and magnetic fields. But every animal is enclosed within its own unique sensory bubble, perceiving but a tiny sliver of an immense world. This book welcomes us into a previously unfathomable dimension--the world as it is truly perceived by other animals. We encounter beetles that are drawn to fires (and fireworks), songbirds that can see the Earth's magnetic fields, and brainless jellyfish tha...t nonetheless have complex eyes. We discover that a crocodile's scaly face is as sensitive as a lover's fingertips, that the eyes of a giant squid evolved to see sparkling whales, and that even fingernail-sized spiders can make out the craters of the moon. We meet people with unusual senses, from women who can make out extra colors to blind individuals who can navigate using reflected echoes like bats. Yong tells the stories of pivotal discoveries in the field, and also looks ahead at the many mysteries which lie unsolved"--

Saved in:
2 people waiting
2 being processed

2nd Floor New Shelf Show me where

591.5/Yong
0 / 10 copies available

Bookmobile Nonfiction Show me where

591.5/Yong
0 / 1 copies available

2nd Floor EXPRESS shelf Show me where

591.5/Yong
0 / 2 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 10, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 18, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 7, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 25, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 16, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) On Holdshelf
+1 Hold
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 19, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 7, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 9, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 591.5/Yong (NEW SHELF) Due Sep 29, 2022
Bookmobile Nonfiction 591.5/Yong Due Oct 21, 2022
2nd Floor EXPRESS shelf 591.5/Yong Due Sep 29, 2022
2nd Floor EXPRESS shelf 591.5/Yong Due Oct 13, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York : Random House 2022.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
x, 449 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color), charts ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages [385]-429) and index.
ISBN
9780593133231
0593133234
Main Author
Ed Yong (author)
  • The only true voyage
  • Leaking sacks of chemicals : smells and tastes
  • Endless ways of seeing : light
  • Rurple, grurple, yurple : color
  • The unwanted sense : pain
  • So cool : heat
  • A rough sense : contact and flow
  • The rippling ground : surface vibrations
  • All ears : sound
  • A silent world shouts back : echoes
  • Living batteries : electric fields
  • They know the way : magnetic fields
  • Every window at once : uniting the senses
  • Save the quiet, preserve the dark : threatened sensescapes.
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* In I Contain Multitudes (2016), science writer Yong exquisitely explored the teeniest domains of life, microbiomes. Now he sets his sights on sensory biology and animal behavior. Umwelt is the term used to describe the distinctive sensory experience of any particular creature. The "sensecapes" of different animals can be dominated not just by vision, smell, taste, touch, or sound but also heat, flow, and even magnetoreception. The menagerie of critters and their unique perceptual abilities Yong examines here include the platypus with a bill that detects electric fields, sand scorpions that rely on surface vibrations to hunt prey, the echolocation prowess of bats and dolphins, the ultrafast vision of killer flies, and the outstanding olfaction of elephants. The facts are frequently astonishing. For example, the majority of insects appear to be deaf. Pain is referred to as the "unwanted sense," and naked mole-rats are relatively impervious to some types of it. Yong's writing is empathetic, impeccably researched, imaginative, and entertaining. The tongue of a slithering rattlesnake "turns the world into both map and menu" whereas catfish are depicted as Daliesque "swimming tongues." Yong worries about humanity's "ecological sins," as sensory pollution—noise, night lighting, chemicals—is ubiquitous. Yong's scientific curiosity and concern for the natural world are contagious. This is "sense"-ational reading. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* In I Contain Multitudes (2016), science writer Yong exquisitely explored the teeniest domains of life, microbiomes. Now he sets his sights on sensory biology and animal behavior. Umwelt is the term used to describe the distinctive sensory experience of any particular creature. The "sensecapes" of different animals can be dominated not just by vision, smell, taste, touch, or sound but also heat, flow, and even magnetoreception. The menagerie of critters and their unique perceptual abilities Yong examines here include the platypus with a bill that detects electric fields, sand scorpions that rely on surface vibrations to hunt prey, the echolocation prowess of bats and dolphins, the ultrafast vision of killer flies, and the outstanding olfaction of elephants. The facts are frequently astonishing. For example, the majority of insects appear to be deaf. Pain is referred to as the "unwanted sense," and naked mole-rats are relatively impervious to some types of it. Yong's writing is empathetic, impeccably researched, imaginative, and entertaining. The tongue of a slithering rattlesnake "turns the world into both map and menu" whereas catfish are depicted as Daliesque "swimming tongues." Yong worries about humanity's "ecological sins," as sensory pollution—noise, night lighting, chemicals—is ubiquitous. Yong's scientific curiosity and concern for the natural world are contagious. This is "sense"-ational reading. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

In Race and Reckoning, Cose (The Rage of a Privileged Class) argues that throughout U.S. history racial bias has always shaped key decisions and events (25,000-copy first printing). Ten years in the making, journalist Fairbanks's The Inheritors follows three everyday South Africans over five decades to reveal how the end of apartheid unfolded. From Hager, historian-in-residence at the Presidential Pet Museum, All-American Dogs is organized by historical era to chronicle the 31 U.S. presidents who have kept canines within petting distance at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (100,000-copy first printing; four-color illustrations). Ranging from the early 1800s to the early 2000s, Livingstone reveals the manifold accomplishments of The Women of Rothschild (40,000-copy first printing). In Code Gray, ER physician Nahvi highlights the daily ethical questions faced by doctors in his position (50,000-copy first printing). In Nerd, New York Times critic at large Phillips, who writes about theater and poetry as well as film, shows how pop-culture fan favorites from Star Wars to Buffy the Vampire Slayer to Doctor Who have shaped her—and have much to tell us about society at large (50,000-copy first printing). A multi-award-winning British author who specializes in French history and culture—his biographies of Hugo, Rimbaud, and Balzac were all New York Times Best Books—Robb now gives us France from Gaulish times 'til COVID-19. Journalist-turned-money manager Steinmetz (The Richest Man Who Ever Lived) introduces us to an American Rascal—Jay Gould, richer than Rockefeller or even Croesus and the reason Wall Street's first financial reforms were instituted (50,000-copy first printing). Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times best-selling science writer Yong reveals how animals other than humans perceive their surroundings in An Immense World. Copyright 2022 Library Journal.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

In Race and Reckoning, Cose (The Rage of a Privileged Class) argues that throughout U.S. history racial bias has always shaped key decisions and events (25,000-copy first printing). Ten years in the making, journalist Fairbanks's The Inheritors follows three everyday South Africans over five decades to reveal how the end of apartheid unfolded. From Hager, historian-in-residence at the Presidential Pet Museum, All-American Dogs is organized by historical era to chronicle the 31 U.S. presidents who have kept canines within petting distance at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (100,000-copy first printing; four-color illustrations). Ranging from the early 1800s to the early 2000s, Livingstone reveals the manifold accomplishments of The Women of Rothschild (40,000-copy first printing). In Code Gray, ER physician Nahvi highlights the daily ethical questions faced by doctors in his position (50,000-copy first printing). In Nerd, New York Times critic at large Phillips, who writes about theater and poetry as well as film, shows how pop-culture fan favorites from Star Wars to Buffy the Vampire Slayer to Doctor Who have shaped her—and have much to tell us about society at large (50,000-copy first printing). A multi-award-winning British author who specializes in French history and culture—his biographies of Hugo, Rimbaud, and Balzac were all New York Times Best Books—Robb now gives us France from Gaulish times 'til COVID-19. Journalist-turned-money manager Steinmetz (The Richest Man Who Ever Lived) introduces us to an American Rascal—Jay Gould, richer than Rockefeller or even Croesus and the reason Wall Street's first financial reforms were instituted (50,000-copy first printing). Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times best-selling science writer Yong reveals how animals other than humans perceive their surroundings in An Immense World. Copyright 2022 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Pulitzer-winning journalist Yong (I Contain Multitudes) reveals in this eye-opening survey animals' world through their own perceptions. Every animal is "enclosed within its own unique sensory bubble," he writes, or its own "perceptual world." Yong's tour covers vision (mantis shrimp have "12 photoreceptor classes"), sound (birds, researchers suggest, hear in a similar range as humans but they hear faster), and nociception, the tactile sense that sends danger signals (which is so widespread that it exists among "creatures separated by around 800 million years of evolution"). There are a wealth of other senses outside the standard five: sea turtles have two magnetic senses, electric fish generate currents to "sense their surroundings" as well as to communicate with each other, and the platypus's sensitive bill gives it what scientists think may be "electrotouch." Yong ends with a warning against light and sound pollution, which can confuse and disturb animals' lives, and advocation that "natural sensescapes" ought to be preserved and restored. He's a strong writer and makes a convincing case against seeing the world as only humans do: "By giving in to our preconceptions, we miss what might be right in front of us. And sometimes what we miss is breathtaking." This is science writing at its best. (July) Copyright 2022 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"The Earth teems with sights and textures, sounds and vibrations, smells and tastes, electric and magnetic fields. But every animal is enclosed within its own unique sensory bubble, perceiving but a tiny sliver of an immense world.This book welcomes us into a previously unfathomable dimension--the world as it is truly perceived by other animals. We encounter beetles that are drawn to fires (and fireworks), songbirds that can see the Earth's magnetic fields, and brainless jellyfish that nonetheless have complex eyes. We discover that a crocodile's scaly face is as sensitive as a lover's fingertips, that the eyes of a giant squid evolved to see sparkling whales, and that even fingernail-sized spiders can make out the craters of the moon. We meet people with unusual senses, from women who can make out extra colors to blind individuals who can navigate using reflected echoes like bats. Yong tells the stories of pivotal discoveries in the field, and also looks ahead at the many mysteries which lie unsolved"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times best-selling author of I Contain Multitudes examines how the world of animal senses can help us understand and transform the way we perceive our world. Illustrations.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Every kind of animal, including humans, is enclosed within its own unique sensory bubble, perceiving but a tiny sliver of our immense world. Pulitzer Prize–winning science journalist Ed Yong takes us on “a thrilling tour of nonhuman perception” (The New York Times), allowing us to experience the skeins of scent, waves of electromagnetism, and pulses of pressure that other animals perceive.  “One of this year’s finest works of narrative nonfiction . . . Yong’s reporting is layered, seasoned with vivid scenes from laboratories and in the field, interviews with researchers across a spectrum of disciplines.”—Oprah Daily “A dazzling ride through the sensory world of astoundingly sophisticated creatures.”—The Wall Street JournalThe Earth teems with sights and textures, sounds and vibrations, smells and tastes, electric and magnetic fields. In An Immense World, Ed Yong coaxes us beyond the confines of our own senses to encounter beetles that are drawn to fires, turtles that can track the Earth’s magnetic fields, fish that fill rivers with electrical messages, and even humans who wield sonar like bats. We discover that a crocodile’s scaly face is as sensitive as a lover’s fingertips, that the eyes of a giant squid evolved to see sparkling whales, that plants thrum with the inaudible songs of courting bugs, and that even simple scallops have complex vision. We learn what bees see in flowers, what songbirds hear in their tunes, and what dogs smell on the street. We listen to stories of pivotal discoveries in the field, while looking ahead at the many mysteries that remain unsolved. Funny, rigorous, and suffused with the joy of discovery, An Immense World takes us on what Marcel Proust called “the only true voyage . . . not to visit strange lands, but to possess other eyes.”