Treaty words For as long as the rivers flow

Aimée Craft, 1980-

Book - 2021

"The first treaty that was made was between the earth and the sky. It was an agreement to work together. We build all of our treaties on that original treaty. On the banks of the river that have been Mishomis's home his whole life, he teaches his granddaughter to listen--to hear both the sounds and the silences, and so to learn her place in Creation. Most importantly, he teaches her about treaties--the bonds of reciprocity and renewal that endure for as long as the sun shines, the gras...s grows, and the rivers flow. Accompanied by beautiful illustrations by Luke Swinson and an author's note at the end, Aimée Craft affirms the importance of understanding an Indigenous perspective on treaties in this evocative book that is essential for readers of all ages."--

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Subjects
Genres
Informational works
Creative nonfiction
Picture books
Published
Toronto ; Berkeley : Annick Press [2021]
Language
English
Physical Description
57 pages : color illustrations ; 18 cm
Issued also in electronic formats
ISBN
9781773214962
1773214969
Main Author
Aimée Craft, 1980- (author)
Other Authors
Luke Swinson, 1989- (illustrator)
Review by PW Annex Reviews

An Anishinaabe grandfather (Mishomis in Anishinaabemowin) and granddaughter take in the view of the river that flows past Mishomis's home, where he has spent a lifetime bringing balance to nature. His city-dwelling granddaughter listens intently as Mishomis imparts beliefs: "Treaties are the basis of all relationships. We use the word Aagooiiddiwin to explain the treaty. It means that we agree to work together." A treaty, Mishomis continues, needs "respect, reciprocity, and renewal" to thrive. That respect is warmly evident in the granddaughter's love for Mishomis and for nature. Craft (who is Anishinaabe/Métis) employs quiet, tender language in an oral storytelling style. Swinson (also Anishinaabe), offers sinuous, stylized graphic drawings that further emphasize the harmony of thoughtful relationships: between Grandfather Sun and Grandmother Moon, the child and her grandparent, and the sun and ice working together to free the river from its winter coat. This pocket-size picture book elegantly reveals the intended beauty and harmony of a treaty from an indispensable Indigenous perspective. Back matter includes an author's note that delves further into the making of a treaty. Ages 9–12. (Mar.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly Annex.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 4–6—This warm, thoughtful book about kinships and history may struggle to find its audience. Too short to be a chapter book and too long to be a picture book, it covers high level concepts and so cannot be used for transitional readers. An Anishinaabe girl and her grandfather enjoy the spring thaw along the river, an annual tradition for them. They observe nature where "They knew that all of this would be happening with or without them, that they were such a small part of creation." He tells her stories of treaties between the creator and its animal and human creations, and treaties between people. The granddaughter absorbs all her elder says about their connection to the land, and the reason: "the treaty is for as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers flow." Soft color sketches with minimal details show their day on the river, with their creation myths and history depicted in cool tones. In most scenes the river cuts across the earthy colors in a vivid blue swash. Anishinaabe words are used, and some terms can be understood in the context of the narrative; there is no glossary. An author's note takes on the importance of "respect, responsibility, and renewal," which are the focus of the story. VERDICT This quiet contemplative account of learning to live with nature and together as people has a place in every collection, and while its meditative tone will appeal to older and more advanced readers, it could be the centerpiece of a story hour for younger listeners.—Tamara Saarinen, Pierce County Lib., WA Copyright 2021 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"The first treaty that was made was between the earth and the sky. It was an agreement to work together. We build all of our treaties on that original treaty. On the banks of the river that have been Mishomis's home his whole life, he teaches his granddaughter to listen--to hear both the sounds and the silences, and so to learn her place in Creation. Most importantly, he teaches her about treaties--the bonds of reciprocity and renewal that endure for as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers flow. Accompanied by beautiful illustrations by Luke Swinson and an author's note at the end, Aimâee Craft affirms the importance of understanding an Indigenous perspective on treaties in this evocative book that is essential for readers of all ages."--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The first treaty that was made was between the earth and the sky. It was an agreement to work together. We build all of our treaties on that original treaty.On the banks of the river that have been Mishomis's home his whole life, he teaches his granddaughter to listen'to hear both the sounds and the silences, and so to learn her place in Creation. Most importantly, he teaches her about treaties'the bonds of reciprocity and renewal that endure for as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers flow. Accompanied by beautiful illustrations by Luke Swinson and an author's note at the end, Aimée Craft affirms the importance of understanding an Indigenous perspective on treaties in this evocative book that is essential for readers of all ages.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The first treaty that was made was between the earth and the sky. It was an agreement to work together. We build all of our treaties on that original treaty.On the banks of the river that have been Mishomis’s home his whole life, he teaches his granddaughter to listen—to hear both the sounds and the silences, and so to learn her place in Creation. Most importantly, he teaches her about treaties—the bonds of reciprocity and renewal that endure for as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers flow. Accompanied by beautiful illustrations by Luke Swinson and an author’s note at the end, Aimée Craft affirms the importance of understanding an Indigenous perspective on treaties in this evocative book that is essential for readers of all ages.