The twilight world

Werner Herzog, 1942-

Book - 2022

"Werner Herzog, one of the most revered filmmakers of all time, in his first book in many years, tells the story of Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who continued to defend a small island in the Philippines for twenty-nine years after the end of World War Two In 1997, Werner Herzog was in Tokyo to direct an opera. His hosts there asked, whom would you like to meet? He replied instantly: Hiroo Onoda. Onoda was a former solider famous for having quixotically defended an island in the Philippin...es for decades after World War II, unaware the war was over. At their meeting, Herzog and Onoda spoke for hours, and together began to unravel Onoda's incredible story. At the end of 1944, on Lubang Island in the Philippines, with Japanese troops about to withdraw, Lieutenant Hiroo Onoda was given orders by his superior officer: Hold the island until the Imperial army's return. Defend the territory with guerilla tactics at all costs. There is only one rule: you are forbidden to die by your own hand. In the event of capture, give the enemy all the misleading information you can. Onoda dutifully retreated into the jungle, and so began his long campaign. Soon weeks turned into months, months into years, and years into decades. And all the while Onoda continued to follow his orders, surviving by any means necessary, at first with other soldiers, and then, finally, all alone in the jungle, like a phantom, becoming one with the natural world. Until eventually time itself seemed to melt away. In The Twilight World, Herzog immortalizes Onoda's years of absurd yet epic struggle, recounting his lonely mission in an inimitable, hypnotic style-part documentary, part poem, and part dream-that will be instantly recognizable to fans of his films. The result is something like a modern-day Robinson Crusoe: nothing less than a glowing, dancing meditation on the purpose and meaning we give our lives"--

Saved in:
6 people waiting
1 copy ordered
1 being processed

1st Floor New Shelf Show me where

FICTION/Herzog Werner
0 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
1st Floor New Shelf FICTION/Herzog Werner (NEW SHELF) On Holdshelf
+1 Hold
Subjects
Genres
Biographies
Nonfiction novels
Published
New York : Penguin Press 2022.
Language
English
German
Item Description
"Originally published in German as Das Dämmern der Welt by Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, München."
Physical Description
132 pages ; 21 cm
ISBN
9780593490266
0593490266
Main Author
Werner Herzog, 1942- (author)
Other Authors
Michael Hofmann, 1957 August 25- (translator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella. Dispatched to Lubang Island in the Philippines, Japanese intelligence officer Hiroo Onoda took to the jungle when U.S. forces arrived in 1945. Committed to orders to hold the island, he and three comrades stayed there for nearly three decades, eating stolen rice and carrying out minor guerrilla attacks. Onoda's final 18 months, before he was discovered by an eccentric Japanese yeti-seeker, were spent alone. Journalistic accounts and a documentary film emphasize Onoda's extreme endurance and unmatched delusion. But Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda's predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. Leaflets announcing the Japanese surrender are dismissed as propaganda, and technological advances—jet aircraft, tubeless radios—confirm rather than dispel Onoda's belief that the war continues. His doubts, when they come, are about perception itself. "Is it possible that I am dreaming this war?" wonders Onoda, in a brief moment of rainy-season contemplation. Perhaps we prefer the jungle, Herzog suggests, if the alternative is facing reality. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella. Dispatched to Lubang Island in the Philippines, Japanese intelligence officer Hiroo Onoda took to the jungle when U.S. forces arrived in 1945. Committed to orders to hold the island, he and three comrades stayed there for nearly three decades, eating stolen rice and carrying out minor guerrilla attacks. Onoda's final 18 months, before he was discovered by an eccentric Japanese yeti-seeker, were spent alone. Journalistic accounts and a documentary film emphasize Onoda's extreme endurance and unmatched delusion. But Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda's predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. Leaflets announcing the Japanese surrender are dismissed as propaganda, and technological advances—jet aircraft, tubeless radios—confirm rather than dispel Onoda's belief that the war continues. His doubts, when they come, are about perception itself. "Is it possible that I am dreaming this war?" wonders Onoda, in a brief moment of rainy-season contemplation. Perhaps we prefer the jungle, Herzog suggests, if the alternative is facing reality. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

A highly influential film and opera director for decades, Herzog offers a first novel reimagining the life of Hiroo Onoda, the Japanese soldier ordered during World War II to hold a small Philippines island until the return of the imperial Japanese army. He remained for 29 years after war's end, learning the ways of the jungle as he fought an imagined war with guerrilla tactics. On a trip to Japan, Herzog asked to meet Onoda, and they developed a special rapport that inspired Herzog to tell this story. Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

DEBUT Herzog is internationally acclaimed as a maker of films peopled by obsessive characters struggling in wild, uncontrollable settings (Fitzcarraldo comes to mind). Herzog's first novel is no different. Lt. Hiroo Onoda, an obedient Japanese soldier, survives in the Philippine jungle as he continues to fight a war that ended 29 years ago. Based on a true story, this novel chronicles Onoda's almost mindlessly steadfast adherence to orders that kept him relentlessly fighting World War II long after there was no one and no reason to fight. Onoda's experience, owing to its sheer length, could have lent itself to the epic treatment Norman Mailer lavished on his World War II Philippines experience, The Naked and the Dead. That sort of treatment would have shifted focus from Onoda's single-mindedness to his war with the environment. Through spare language and minimal detail that recall Herzog's screenwriting technique, together with great leaps through time, the novel spans the full 29 years of Onoda's remarkable story while keeping the focus on him. VERDICT A brief but powerful and noteworthy addition to the résumé of a master storyteller; fans of Herzog's films will see the filmmaker's cinematic fingerprints all over this absurdist, if absorbing, story.—Michael F. Russo Copyright 2022 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Filmmaker Herzog (the diary Of Walking in Ice) draws on the true story of a Japanese officer who patrolled the Filipino jungle for nearly three decades after WWII, unaware the war had ended, in his fascinating debut novel. As the Imperial Army prepares to withdraw from Lubang Island in December 1944, Lt. Hiroo Onoda is ordered to remain behind and defend the territory by guerilla tactics. But after fellow officers refuse to assist him in dynamiting a port, Allied forces capture the island and decimate the remaining troops. Onoda perseveres in his mission, retreating to the mountains in the company of a young corporal. Night after night they remain on the move, preserving their bullets with coconut oil and battling deprivation by killing the odd buffalo or raiding small villages. Later, Onoda mistakes American planes en route to Korea, and later Vietnam, as proof that his war rages on. In spare prose, Herzog conveys Onoda's strange relationship to the passage of time: "After all his millions of steps," the lieutenant "understood that there was—there could be—no such thing as the present." Onoda's reemergence into a changed world in 1975 adds a captivating layer, though it's all too brief and lightly sketched. Still, Onoda shares with the director's filmic protagonists a fierce will and singular perspective. This will whet the reader's appetite for a film version. (June) Copyright 2022 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

In his first novel, the great filmmaker tells the extraordinary story of Hiroo Onoda, a former soldier famous for having defended a small island in the Philippines for 29 years after WWII, unaware the fighting was over.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"Werner Herzog, one of the most revered filmmakers of all time, in his first book in many years, tells the story of Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who continued to defend a small island in the Philippines for twenty-nine years after the end of World WarII. In 1997, Werner Herzog was in Tokyo to direct an opera. His hosts there asked, whom would you like to meet? He replied instantly: Hiroo Onoda. Onoda was a former solider famous for having quixotically defended an island in the Philippines for decadesafter World War II, unaware the war was over. At their meeting, Herzog and Onoda spoke for hours, and together began to unravel Onoda's incredible story. At the end of 1944, on Lubang Island in the Philippines, with Japanese troops about to withdraw, Lieutenant Hiroo Onoda was given orders by his superior officer: Hold the island until the Imperial army's return. Defend the territory with guerilla tactics at all costs. There is only one rule: you are forbidden to die by your own hand. In the event of capture, give the enemy all the misleading information you can. Onoda dutifully retreated into the jungle, and so began his long campaign. Soon weeks turned into months, months into years, and years into decades. And all the while Onoda continued to follow his orders, surviving by any means necessary, at first with other soldiers, and then, finally, all alone in the jungle, like a phantom, becoming one with the natural world. Until eventually time itself seemed to melt away. In The Twilight World, Herzog immortalizes Onoda's years of absurd yet epic struggle, recounting his lonely mission in an inimitable, hypnotic style-part documentary, part poem, and part dream-that will be instantly recognizable to fans of his films. The result is something like a modern-day Robinson Crusoe: nothing less than a glowing, dancing meditation on the purpose and meaning we give our lives"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A National Bestseller!The great filmmaker Werner Herzog, in his first novel, tells the incredible story of Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who defended a small island in the Philippines for twenty-nine years after the end of World War IIIn 1997, Werner Herzog was in Tokyo to direct an opera. His hosts asked him, Whom would you like to meet? He replied instantly: Hiroo Onoda. Onoda was a former solider famous for having quixotically defended an island in the Philippines for decades after World War II, unaware the fighting was over. Herzog and Onoda developed an instant rapport and would meet many times, talking for hours and together unraveling the story of Onoda’s long war. At the end of 1944, on Lubang Island in the Philippines, with Japanese troops about to withdraw, Lieutenant Hiroo Onoda was given orders by his superior officer: Hold the island until the Imperial army’s return. You are to defend its territory by guerrilla tactics, at all costs. . . . There is only one rule. You are forbidden to die by your own hand. In the event of your capture by the enemy, you are to give them all the misleading information you can. So began Onoda’s long campaign, during which he became fluent in the hidden language of the jungle. Soon weeks turned into months, months into years, and years into decades—until eventually time itself seemed to melt away. All the while Onoda continued to fight his fictitious war, at once surreal and tragic, at first with other soldiers, and then, finally, alone, a character in a novel of his own making. In The Twilight World, Herzog immortalizes and imagines Onoda’s years of absurd yet epic struggle in an inimitable, hypnotic style—part documentary, part poem, and part dream—that will be instantly recognizable to fans of his films. The result is a novel completely unto itself, a sort of modern-day Robinson Crusoe tale: a glowing, dancing meditation on the purpose and meaning we give our lives.