Grow now How we can save our health, communities, and planet - one garden at a time

Emily Murphy

Book - 2022

"What is an easy, actionable way to put excess atmospheric carbon back in the ground and reduce our contributions to emissions and food waste? By creating our own "climate victory gardens." We now recognize that plots in towns and cities are critical to supporting planetary diversity, and by instituting organic, regenerative practices and growing some of our own food, we can sequester carbon as well as shift toward living in a more ecologically responsible way. This book will help... families across the country to address eco-anxiety and particpiate in climate activism in a nurturing and positive way"--

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2nd Floor New Shelf 635.0484/Murphy (NEW SHELF) Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Handbooks and manuals
Published
Portland, Oregon : Timber Press 2022.
Language
English
Item Description
Includes index.
"Go beyond organic ; rewild your land ; sequester carbon ; support biodiversity" -- Cover.
Physical Description
247 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm
ISBN
9781643260471
1643260472
Main Author
Emily Murphy (author)
  • Grow a garden, change your life
  • Go beyond organic
  • Lay the groundwork
  • Plants for people and the planet
  • Grow and gather
  • Rewilding to support biodiversity
  • Grow more good.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Nearly all of the material shared here by Murphy (Grow What You Love, 2018) can be accessed in other guides, but it's her reframing of gardening as a critical factor in mitigating global warming that makes this book so potentially impactful in the hands of a beginning gardener. "We can build and employ energy-consuming carbon-scrubbing machines to remove atmospheric CO2," she writes, "or we can plant seeds, care for the soil, and foster biodiversity, which, in turn, naturally captures and stores carbon from the atmosphere. Which sounds more elegant to you?" To those who choose to garden, she offers a wealth of information on pretty much every aspect of the topic, from developing soil to selecting plants, creating compost, and attracting pollinators. She also covers recent, important trends, like substituting ecologically fragile peat with other seed-starting materials, and not tilling, which unearths weed seeds and disturbs the soil's life-giving microbial network. With a list of related sources and a bibliography, Murphy offers a positive and doable approach to addressing our climate crisis. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Pass the Pistil blogger Murphy (Grow What You Love) delivers an encouraging primer on gardening as a way to combat climate change. She shoots for a simple equation: "my garden + your garden + your neighbor's garden = save the planet one garden at a time," and argues that people shouldn't succumb to the idea that climate change is too big a problem for ordinary people to confront. Murphy begins with an overview of carbon, the "essential building block of life" and "the main ingredient in soil organic matter," and offers tips for maintaining soil health, most of which involve fostering biodiversity. She outlines a slew of regenerative gardening practices, including no-dig gardening, composting, and planting native crops. There's a comprehensive plant guide, too, which covers edible perennials (such as artichokes, asparagus, and chives), edible perennial vines (grapes and chayote), bird and butterfly favorites (including buckwheat and milkweed), and soil builders (broad grass and clover among them). Murphy's account is loaded with easy-to-implement tips, inspiring photos, and useful lists, and she's full of passion: "In our gardens, we can repair ourselves and our plots of earth with our own two hands." New gardeners will find this a fine starting point, and those with dirt already under their nails will enjoy the nudge to try something new. (Jan.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Pass the Pistil blogger Murphy (Grow What You Love) delivers an encouraging primer on gardening as a way to combat climate change. She shoots for a simple equation: "my garden + your garden + your neighbor's garden = save the planet one garden at a time," and argues that people shouldn't succumb to the idea that climate change is too big a problem for ordinary people to confront. Murphy begins with an overview of carbon, the "essential building block of life" and "the main ingredient in soil organic matter," and offers tips for maintaining soil health, most of which involve fostering biodiversity. She outlines a slew of regenerative gardening practices, including no-dig gardening, composting, and planting native crops. There's a comprehensive plant guide, too, which covers edible perennials (such as artichokes, asparagus, and chives), edible perennial vines (grapes and chayote), bird and butterfly favorites (including buckwheat and milkweed), and soil builders (broad grass and clover among them). Murphy's account is loaded with easy-to-implement tips, inspiring photos, and useful lists, and she's full of passion: "In our gardens, we can repair ourselves and our plots of earth with our own two hands." New gardeners will find this a fine starting point, and those with dirt already under their nails will enjoy the nudge to try something new. (Jan.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A regenerative organic gardener, photographer, podcaster and designer shares her simple principles for regenerative gardening to foster biodiversity and improve soil health by choosing plants that cycle more carbon back into the earth and vegetables that improve soil fertility. Original. Illustrations.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"What is an easy, actionable way to put excess atmospheric carbon back in the ground and reduce our contributions to emissions and food waste? By creating our own "climate victory gardens." We now recognize that plots in towns and cities are critical to supporting planetary diversity, and by instituting organic, regenerative practices and growing some of our own food, we can sequester carbon as well as shift toward living in a more ecologically responsible way. This book will help families across the country to address eco-anxiety and particpiate in climate activism in a nurturing and positive way"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Murphy, a regenerative organic gardener, photographer, designer, and author, describes principles for regenerative gardening that promote biodiversity and improve soil health, with the aim to improve human and planetary health. She discusses the biodiversity and climate crises and the role of gardening in fostering change; the carbon cycle and the role of regenerative gardening in using a no-dig approach to return carbon back to soil, reduce carbon emissions, and help restore the soil ecosystem while fostering biodiversity, with tips on composting; garden planning; key plants; growing and harvesting; and using native plants to support biodiversity. Annotation ©2022 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Review by Publisher Summary 4

“Grow Now is an earth manual that applies to everyone, everywhere. Regenerating life begins with our hands, the soil, and our heart. Take this book and go outside, stay outside, and transform.” —Paul Hawken, author of Drawdown and Regeneration Did you know you can have a garden that’s equal parts food source and wildlife haven? In Grow Now, Emily Murphy shares easy-to-follow principles for regenerative gardening that foster biodiversity and improve soil health. She also shows how every single yard mirrors and connects to the greater ecosystem around us.   No-dig growing, composting and mulching smartly, and planting a variety of edible perennials that attract bees and butterflies are all commonsense techniques everyone can use to grow positive change. You'll also find detailed advice on increasing your nature quotient, choosing plants that cycle more carbon back into the soil, selecting a broader variety of vegetables and fruits to improve overall soil fertility, rethinking space devoted to lawns, and adding companion plants for pollinators to rewild any plot of land. Exquisitely photographed and filled with helpful lists and sidebars, Grow Now is an actionable, hopeful, and joyful roadmap for growing our way to individual climate contributions. Gardening is climate activism!

Review by Publisher Summary 5

Homeowners are looking for actionable ways to help conserve the environment, and this hopeful, heartfelt guide offers them specific guidance on how to do so in their own home gardens.