The dictionary of obscure sorrows

John Koenig

Book - 2021

Poetically defining emotions we all feel but don't have the words to express, the creator of the popular online project of the same name invites readers on his epic quest to fill the gaps in the language of emotion.

Saved in:
1 person waiting
1 being processed

2nd Floor Show me where

428.1/Koenig
0 / 1 copies available

2nd Floor New Shelf Show me where

428.1/Koenig
0 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 428.1/Koenig Due Sep 6, 2022
2nd Floor New Shelf 428.1/Koenig (NEW SHELF) Lost--Library Applied
Subjects
Genres
Dictionaries
Published
New York : Simon & Schuster 2021.
Edition
First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
Language
English
Item Description
Includes index.
Physical Description
xiii, 272 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
ISBN
9781501153648
1501153641
Main Author
John Koenig (author)
  • Between living and dreaming
  • The interior wilderness
  • Montage of attractions
  • Faces in a crowd
  • Boats against the current
  • Roll the bones.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Words have the power to transform and make us see the world through a different lens. YouTube host Koenig connects the seemingly unconnectable feelings we as humans experience on a daily basis and puts words to them. Through this practice he has created his own language to define each word along with the etymology that inspired it. Broken into separate chapters that focus on varying themes, each section of Koenig's dictionary contains a brief introduction followed by words and their accompanied definition. Readers will delight in words like funkenzwangsvorstellung which is defined by Koenig as "the primal trance of watching a campfire in the dark." Coming across definitions for words like candling (assessing your life on your birthday), rivener ("a chilling hint of distance that creeps slowly into a relationship"), and elosy (fear of inevitable changes), among many other expressions readers may have not heard before offer a tiny slice of our shared humanity. Koenig brilliantly finds a way to show, in his new words and their definitions, how we connect to ourselves and one another through feelings and emotions. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Despite its title, Koenig's first book is not about sadness, nor is it mostly about faulty or funny feelings, like Eden Sher's The Emotionary: A Dictionary of Words That Don't Exist for Feelings That Do. Rather, focused on longing, awareness, and evanescence, it enshrines Koenig's well-regarded blog (of the same title) of invented, repurposed, or obsolescent but redefined words forming a glossary of emotions. Expanding "the palette of language," Koenig finely dissects and names "even the faintest quirks of the human condition." Six chapters provide minimal category structures, with themes including the outer world, the inner world, others, friends, time, and meaning. Koenig offers pronunciation help and wide-ranging, semi-serious etymologies. Some coinages will produce a fond smile (plata rasa: that lulling dishwasher sound); others, wistful or anxious recognition (slipfast: the longing to slide through unnoticed). Entries are usually brief, but some expand into reflective mini-essays (morii: the wish to capture the ephemeral). A couple might elicit a wince, but most are agile, erudite, poetic, clever, even witty (aubadoir: that predawn feeling). VERDICT For philosophers, language lovers, novelists, and fantasists, this perspective-expanding little book offers abundant ambedo ("a momentary trance of emotional clarity").—Patricia D. Lothrop Copyright 2022 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Koenig (Charismata) brings his website of the same name to the page in this whimsical speculative dictionary of "new words for emotions." His definitions are broken into six sections: "Between living and dreaming" introduces the word for the longing to quit one's job for a "simple life" (trumspringa) and for being proud of a scar (scabulous), while "The interior wilderness" covers the desire to care less and relax (liberosis). In "Montage of attractions," fensiveness is "a knee-jerk territorial reaction when a friend displays a casual interest in one of your obsessions," and "Faces in a crowd" covers hailbound, the compulsion to wave to strangers. In "Boats against the current," zenosyne is "the feeling that time is getting faster," while in "Roll the bones," elosy is the fear of big life changes. While most are straightforward definitions, some are "featured" and come in the form of essays on the feeling the term is meant to evoke. Unfortunately, Koenig sometimes slips into platitudes (in his entry for alazia, the fear that one can't change, he writes that "even if it's true that you're no longer flexible enough to be anybody, you might be getting strong enough to finally be yourself"). Still, fans of the site will find this appropriately diverting. Agent: Heather Karpas, ICM Partners. (Nov.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Koenig (Charismata) brings his website of the same name to the page in this whimsical speculative dictionary of "new words for emotions." His definitions are broken into six sections: "Between living and dreaming" introduces the word for the longing to quit one's job for a "simple life" (trumspringa) and for being proud of a scar (scabulous), while "The interior wilderness" covers the desire to care less and relax (liberosis). In "Montage of attractions," fensiveness is "a knee-jerk territorial reaction when a friend displays a casual interest in one of your obsessions," and "Faces in a crowd" covers hailbound, the compulsion to wave to strangers. In "Boats against the current," zenosyne is "the feeling that time is getting faster," while in "Roll the bones," elosy is the fear of big life changes. While most are straightforward definitions, some are "featured" and come in the form of essays on the feeling the term is meant to evoke. Unfortunately, Koenig sometimes slips into platitudes (in his entry for alazia, the fear that one can't change, he writes that "even if it's true that you're no longer flexible enough to be anybody, you might be getting strong enough to finally be yourself"). Still, fans of the site will find this appropriately diverting. Agent: Heather Karpas, ICM Partners. (Nov.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Poetically defining emotions we all feel but don't have the words to express, the creator of the popular online project of the same name invites readers on his epic quest to fill the gaps in the language of emotion.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Poetically defining emotions we all feel but don’t have the words to express, the creator of the popular online project of the same name invites readers on his epic quest to fill the gaps in the language of emotion. 35,000 first printing. Illustrations.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER“It’s undeniably thrilling to find words for our strangest feelings…Koenig casts light into lonely corners of human experience…An enchanting book. “ —The Washington PostA truly original book in every sense of the word, The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows poetically defines emotions that we all feel but don’t have the words to express—until now. Have you ever wondered about the lives of each person you pass on the street, realizing that everyone is the main character in their own story, each living a life as vivid and complex as your own? That feeling has a name: “sonder.” Or maybe you’ve watched a thunderstorm roll in and felt a primal hunger for disaster, hoping it would shake up your life. That’s called “lachesism.” Or you were looking through old photos and felt a pang of nostalgia for a time you’ve never actually experienced. That’s “anemoia.”If you’ve never heard of these terms before, that’s because they didn’t exist until John Koenig set out to fill the gaps in our language of emotion. The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows “creates beautiful new words that we need but do not yet have,” says John Green, bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars. By turns poignant, relatable, and mind-bending, the definitions include whimsical etymologies drawn from languages around the world, interspersed with otherworldly collages and lyrical essays that explore forgotten corners of the human condition—from “astrophe,” the longing to explore beyond the planet Earth, to “zenosyne,” the sense that time keeps getting faster. The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows is for anyone who enjoys a shift in perspective, pondering the ineffable feelings that make up our lives. With a gorgeous package and beautiful illustrations throughout, this is the perfect gift for creatives, word nerds, and human beings everywhere.