Saving us A climate scientist's case for hope and healing in a divided world

Katharine Hayhoe

Book - 2021

"Called "one of the nation's most effective communicators on climate change" by The New York Times, Katharine Hayhoe knows how to navigate all sides of the conversation on our changing planet. A Canadian climate scientist living in Texas, she negotiates distrust of data, indifference to imminent threats, and resistance to proposed solutions with ease. Over the past fifteen years Hayhoe has found that the most important thing we can do to address climate change is talk about i...t--and she wants to teach you how."--Amazon.

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Subjects
Published
New York, NY : One Signal Publishers/Atria Books 2021.
Edition
First One Signal Publishers/Atria Books hardcover edition
Language
English
Physical Description
xii, 307 pages : 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781982143831
1982143835
Main Author
Katharine Hayhoe (author)
  • The problem and the solution. Democrats and dismissives ; Who I am ; Who you are
  • Why facts matter
  • and why they are not enough. The facts are the facts ; The problem with facts ; The fear factor ; The guilt complex
  • The threat multiplier. A faraway threat ; Here and now ; No time to waste ; The sickness and the cure
  • We can fix it. Why we fear solutions ; Carbon and the common good ; The climate potluck ; Everyone needs energy ; Cleaning up our act ; Time to speed up
  • You can make a difference. Why you matter ; What I do ; Why talking matters ; Bond, connect, and inspire ; Finding hope and courage.
Review by Library Journal Reviews

Director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, plus a United Nations Champion of the Earth and one of Time's "100 Most Influential People," among other encomiums, Hayhoe believes that the divide between climate-change believers and doubters can be bridged with language that avoids extremism and hence guilt, alarm, and despair. That way, we can care for our world together. With a 75,000-copy first printing. Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Climate scientist Hayhoe (political science, Texas Tech Univ.; chief scientist of the Nature Conservancy) offers a highly readable, well-organized study of polarizing issues surrounding climate change; it's also memoiristic. The book loudly announces its intentions in the first pages, where Hayhoe articulates the intersection of her scientific research and her situated knowledge (the idea that knowledge reflects the context in which it is produced and the identity of its producer). Too often, realism and hope exist in opposition, which is deflating (and, as Hayhoe brilliantly argues, defeatist) during a time of cataclysmic unrest in social, environmental, medical, and political spaces. Hayhoe's book contains careful arguments, scientific data, and personal stories about climate change, but its most significant contributions are, first, showing readers that conversations with others have an impact, and second, explaining how to have dialogues in open, loving ways to move toward change. Hayhoe is open about the deleterious effects of partisan politics on the ability to talk about environmental issues. The strategies she leaves her readers with are therefore as much about having difficult conversations across party lines as they are about science. VERDICT Spanning the intersection of science, politics, and memoir, Hayhoe's debut offers guidance on what readers can do to effect change.—Emily Bowles, Lawrence Univ., WI Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Practical advice abounds in this compassionate guide to conducting meaningful discussions about the environment from climate scientist Hayhoe (All We Can Save). Aiming to show "how to have conversations" that " genuine relationships and communities," Hayhoe casts aside the notion of believers versus deniers and instead makes use of a grouping system devised by researchers Tony Leiserowitz and Ed Maibach that divides people into six categories: the alarmed, concerned, cautious, disengaged, doubtful, and dismissive. It is easier to target messages, Hayhoe notes, when one better understands the audience: if talking to someone doubtful, for instance, scientific explanations can help change their minds, but taking the same approach with dismissives will lead to them doubling down on their rejection. The author also considers the emotions of fear and guilt that come up when talking about the health of the planet, and suggests it's key to channel these emotions into a belief that things can be fixed. Above all, Hayhoe's advice comes down to bonding and connecting with people; a way to begin, she writes, is to ask "Because of what we both care about, why might climate change matter to us?" While some may find her outlook a bit rose-tinged—"We can fix it. There are solutions"—those in search of a hope-filled approach will find plenty of encouragement. (Sept.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"United Nations Champion of the Earth, climate scientist, and evangelical Christian Katharine Hayhoe changes the debate on how we can save our future. Called "one of the nation's most effective communicators on climate change" by The New York Times, Katharine Hayhoe knows how to navigate all sides of the conversation on our changing planet. A Canadian climate scientist living in Texas, she negotiates distrust of data, indifference to imminent threats, and resistance to proposed solutions with ease. Over the past fifteen years Hayhoe has found that the most important thing we can do to address climate change is talk about it--and she wants to teach you how"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Drawing on interdisciplinary research and personal stories, the chief scientist for the Nature Conservancy shows how small conversations can have extraordinary results as we all play a role in pushing forward for change. 75,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

NATIONAL BESTSELLER“An optimistic view on why collective action is still possible—and how it can be realized.” —The New York Times“As far as heroic characters go, I’m not sure you could do better than Katharine Hayhoe.” —Scientific American“It’s not an exaggeration to say that Saving Us is one of the more important books about climate change to have been written.” —The GuardianUnited Nations Champion of the Earth, climate scientist, and evangelical Christian Katharine Hayhoe changes the debate on how we can save our future.Called “one of the nation's most effective communicators on climate change” by The New York Times, Katharine Hayhoe knows how to navigate all sides of the conversation on our changing planet. A Canadian climate scientist living in Texas, she negotiates distrust of data, indifference to imminent threats, and resistance to proposed solutions with ease. Over the past fifteen years Hayhoe has found that the most important thing we can do to address climate change is talk about it—and she wants to teach you how. In Saving Us, Hayhoe argues that when it comes to changing hearts and minds, facts are only one part of the equation. We need to find shared values in order to connect our unique identities to collective action. This is not another doomsday narrative about a planet on fire. It is a multilayered look at science, faith, and human psychology, from an icon in her field—recently named chief scientist at The Nature Conservancy. Drawing on interdisciplinary research and personal stories, Hayhoe shows that small conversations can have astonishing results. Saving Us leaves us with the tools to open a dialogue with your loved ones about how we all can play a role in pushing forward for change.