White malice The CIA and the covert recolonization of Africa

A. Susan Williams

Book - 2021

Drawing on original research and recently declassified documents, this book exposes the covert operations pursued by the CIA from Ghana to the Congo to the UN in an effort to frustrate and deny Africa's new generation of nationalist leaders.

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2nd Floor New Shelf 327.7306/Williams (NEW SHELF) Checked In
Subjects
Published
New York : PublicAffairs 2021.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
viii, 651 pages, 20 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 531-625) and index.
ISBN
9781541768291
1541768299
Main Author
A. Susan Williams (author)
  • The United States of Africa.
  • Freedom at midnight ;
  • 'My home is over Jordan' ;
  • The challenge of the Congo ;
  • 'Hands off Africa!'
  • The CIA.
  • Infiltration into Africa ;
  • 'Africa has become the real battleground' ;
  • Atomium
  • African jazz.
  • The rise of Lumumba ;
  • 'Table ronde' ;
  • Ambassador Burden
  • America and Africa.
  • The Africa division of the CIA ;
  • Voice of Africa ;
  • American CIA agent and Kenyan CIA asset
  • 'Indépendance cha cha'.
  • 'The courageous have won' ;
  • Year of Africa ;
  • Things fall apart ;
  • Eisenhower snubs Lumumba
  • YQPROP.
  • Bribery, bugging and Green Berets ;
  • The road to Calvary ;
  • The poison plot
  • The global game.
  • Africa at the United Nations ;
  • Spying on the UN ;
  • 'Lumumba assails US on uranium'
  • Carrot and stick.
  • Third-country agent QJWIN ;
  • 'The big American stick' ;
  • Ambassador Satch
  • The turning point.
  • Trick or escape? ;
  • Manhunt for Lumumba ;
  • Deep cover agent WIROGUE ;
  • Baking a snake ;
  • Sunk hope
  • The seeds are sown.
  • Arming the skies ;
  • 'A bride everybody wants' ;
  • Made in America ;
  • Hands off Ghana! ;
  • 'America's Angolan'
  • Dark days.
  • 'The CIA reptilian coils' ;
  • Closing in on Nkrumah ;
  • 'One step backward.
  • We shall take two forward' ;
  • The dead hand.
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The quest for African unity was undermined by America's imperialist machinations, according to this labyrinthine study, which focuses on the Congo Crisis and the execution of Patrice Lumumba in 1961. University of London historian Williams (Spies in the Congo) chronicles Lumumba's rise to power as Congo's first prime minister following independence from Belgium in June of 1960, and his rapid downfall amid an army mutiny, a Belgian invasion, a secession movement backed by Western mining companies in the province of Katanga, and a coup launched by future dictator Joseph Mobutu. It's a chaotic saga with many antagonists, but Williams focuses on the U.S. government, which suspected Lumumba of pro-Soviet leanings and wanted control of the Shinkolobwe uranium mine in Katanga. She documents how the CIA funneled support to Mobutu, bribed Congolese politicians to oppose Lumumba, and plotted to assassinate him using poisoned toothpaste, but her allegations of skullduggery sometimes outrun the evidence, as when she speculates that the agency may have played a role in the premature deaths of other African leaders and the novelist Richard Wright. Hampered by Williams's styling of Lumumba as the great hope for Pan-Africanism and an eye-glazing tangle of code names and shadowy ties, this is a reductionist take on a complex tragedy. (Aug.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Drawing on original research and recently declassified documents, this book exposes the covert operations pursued by the CIA from Ghana to the Congo to the UN in an effort to frustrate and deny Africa's new generation of nationalist leaders.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Drawing on original research and recently declassified documents, this book exposes the covert operations pursued by the CIA from Ghana to the Congo to the UN in an effort to frustrate and deny Africa’s new generation of nationalist leaders. 20,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A revelatory history of how postcolonial African Independence movements were systematically undermined by one nation above all: the US.  In 1958 in Accra, Ghana, the Hands Off Africa conference brought together the leading figures of African independence in a public show of political strength and purpose. Led by the charismatic Kwame Nkrumah, who had just won Ghana’s independence, his determined call for Pan-Africanism was heeded by young, idealistic leaders across the continent and by African Americans seeking civil rights at home. Yet, a moment that signified a new era of African freedom simultaneously marked a new era of foreign intervention and control. In White Malice, Susan Williams unearths the covert operations pursued by the CIA from Ghana to the Congo to the UN in an effort to frustrate and deny Africa’s new generation of nationalist leaders. This dramatically upends the conventional belief that the African nations failed to establish effective, democratic states on their own accord. As the old European powers moved out, the US moved in.   Drawing on original research, recently declassified documents, and told through an engaging narrative, Williams introduces readers to idealistic African leaders and to the secret agents, ambassadors, and even presidents who deliberately worked against them, forever altering the future of a continent.