Poet warrior A memoir

Joy Harjo

Book - 2021

"Poet Laureate Joy Harjo offers a vivid, lyrical, and inspiring call for love and justice in this contemplation of her trailblazing life. In the second memoir from the first Native American to serve as US poet laureate, Joy Harjo invites us to travel along the heartaches, losses, and humble realizations of her "poet-warrior" road. A musical, kaleidoscopic meditation, Poet Warrior reveals how Harjo came to write poetry of compassion and healing, poetry with the power to unearth the... truth and demand justice. Weaving together the voices that shaped her, Harjo listens to stories of ancestors and family, the poetry and music that she first encountered as a child, the teachings of a changing earth, and the poets who paved her way. She explores her grief at the loss of her mother and sheds light on the rituals that nourish her as an artist, mother, wife, and community member. Moving fluidly among prose, song, and poetry, Poet Warrior is a luminous journey of becoming that sings with all the jazz, blues, tenderness, and bravery that we know as distinctly Joy Harjo"--

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2nd Floor New Shelf BIOGRAPHY/Harjo, Joy (NEW SHELF) Due Apr 6, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Autobiographies
Autobiographical poetry
Published
New York, N.Y. : W.W. Norton & Company [2021]
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
x, 226 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
ISBN
9780393248524
0393248526
0393248534
9780393248531
Main Author
Joy Harjo (author)
  • To imagine the spirit of poetry
  • Prepare
  • You might know me first
  • Ancestral roots
  • Becoming
  • A postcolonial tale
  • Diamond light
  • Teachers
  • Sunrise.
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Musician, visual artist, and U.S. Poet Laureate Harjo continues her personal story in her second memoir, following the award-winning Crazy Brave (2013), in a genre-bending approach that interweaves poetry and anecdotes, memories, and familial and ancestral history. A member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Harjo grew up where the Trail of Tears halted in Oklahoma, where the U.S. government forcibly relocated her ancestors after brutally stripping them of their homes and land in Georgia and Alabama. Such trauma is carried forward, pain that Harjo views from an expansive, time-transcending perspective that allows her to place it within a larger story. "Does each generation carry forth the wounding that needs to be healed, from mother to mother, cooking pot to cooking pot, song to poetry, and poetry to beadwork, until one day in eternity we will understand what we have created together?" Creativity and imagination helped Harjo escape abusive situations. She was also gifted with the ability to listen deeply and find a place to exist harmoniously between sensuality and physical power and sensitivity and connectedness to other inner and spiritual energies. Throughout this lyrical, beautiful memoir Harjo generously shares her inspirations: family, nature, ritual, music, literature, her life lessons and insights gleaned from her dreams, psychic intuitions, and communications with ancestors. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

The first woman to solo anchor a network evening newscast, winner of multiple honors (including numerous Emmys and two Edward R. Murrow awards), and cofounder of Stand ?Up To Cancer, Couric discusses her personal and professional lives in Going There (750,000-copy first printing). The current U.S. Poet Laureate and a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Harjo relates how she came to be a Poet Warrior whose verse bespeaks compassion and demands justice. As revealed in Brandon Stanton's photoblog Humans of New York—and now in The Redemption of Bobby Love—at age 14 Love was charged with disorderly conduct in the Jim Crow South, subsequently drawn into a band of thieves, and facing a 30-year prison sentence when he escaped to New York, changed his name, and led the model life of a family man with multiple jobs, church, and Little League until the FBI and NYPD came calling after decades (150,000-copy first printing). After successfully negotiating the high-risk birth of twins, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist Ruhl came down with Bell's palsy—a condition paralyzing half the face—and unlike most patients did not recover quickly; Smile relates how she spent a decade searching for a cure while grappling with her suddenly inexpressive face (100,000-copy first printing). Picking up directly after Theft by Finding, Sedaris's previous volume of diaries, A Carnival of Snackery brings us up to the present (750,000-copy first printing). Told by Egyptian Canadian actor Sharif, A Tale of Two Omars relates his life as the grandson of the famed actor on his father's side and Holocaust survivors on his mother's while also reflecting on his life as a gay man in the Arab (and larger) world. Featured on the Forbes List of the 100 Most Powerful Women in the Middle East in 2014, 2015, and 2016, Wassef is the founder and manager of the Cairo-based Diwan, Egypt's first modern bookstore, which now has ten locations, 150 employees, countless loyal customers, and a book of its own with Shelf Life (25,000-copy first printing). Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Three-term U.S. poet laureate Harjo (An American Sunrise) gives readers an in-depth look at her life and her poetry, and what poetry brought to her and to others. In this memoir combining narrative prose and poetry, Harjo recounts her upbringing in a Muscogee (Creek) Nation family and the trials she faced navigating the world. She also tries to understand how the earth has changed throughout the centuries and what its inhabitants must do to heal it. Harjo wisely advises readers to put down technological devices and connect with the earth on a deeper level. She maintains that individuals can become content by listening to animals, which provide friendship and sustenance, and to plants, which provide healing power. The memoir jumps around through time and place; this could be Harjo's way of pointing out that our lives and realizations about the earth do not have to be linear. Rather, she effectively shows how fluid a life can be. VERDICT This poignant read offers a lot of food for thought. Highly recommended for any library, especially for memoir collections.—Elizabeth Ragain, Rogers Heritage H.S., Fayetteville, AR Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Poet Laureate Joy Harjo offers a vivid, lyrical, and inspiring call for love and justice in this contemplation of her trailblazing life. In the second memoir from the first Native American to serve as US poet laureate, Joy Harjo invites us to travel along the heartaches, losses, and humble realizations of her "poet-warrior" road. A musical, kaleidoscopic meditation, Poet Warrior reveals how Harjo came to write poetry of compassion and healing, poetry with the power to unearth the truth and demand justice. Weaving together the voices that shaped her, Harjo listens to stories of ancestors and family, the poetry and music that she first encountered as a child, the teachings of a changing earth, and the poets who paved her way. She explores her grief at theloss of her mother and sheds light on the rituals that nourish her as an artist, mother, wife, and community member. Moving fluidly among prose, song, and poetry, Poet Warrior is a luminous journey of becoming that sings with all the jazz, blues, tenderness, and bravery that we know as distinctly Joy Harjo"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Crazy BravePoet WarriorHarjo listens to stories of ancestors and family, the poetry and music that she first encountered as a child, and the messengers of a changing earth—owls heralding grief, resilient desert plants, and a smooth green snake curled up in surprise. She celebrates the influences that shaped her poetry, among them Audre Lorde, N. Scott Momaday, Walt Whitman, Muscogee stomp dance call-and-response, Navajo horse songs, rain, and sunrise. In absorbing, incantatory prose, Harjo grieves at the loss of her mother, reckons with the theft of her ancestral homeland, and sheds light on the rituals that nourish her as an artist, mother, wife, and community member.Poet Warrior

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Three-term poet laureate Joy Harjo offers a vivid, lyrical, and inspiring call for love and justice in this contemplation of her trailblazing life.