On the trapline

David Robertson, 1977-

Book - 2021

A picture book celebrating Indigenous culture and traditions. The Governor General Award-winning team behind When We Were Alone shares a story that honors our connections to our past and our grandfathers and fathers. A boy and Moshom, his grandpa, take a trip together to visit a place of great meaning to Moshom. A trapline is where people hunt and live off the land, and it was where Moshom grew up. As they embark on their northern journey, the child repeatedly asks his grandfather, "Is this... your trapline?" Along the way, the boy finds himself imagining what life was like two generations ago -- a life that appears to be both different from and similar to his life now. This is a heartfelt story about memory, imagination and intergenerational connection that perfectly captures the experience of a young child's wonder as he is introduced to places and stories that hold meaning for his family.--Amazon.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Robertso Checked In
Children's Room jE/Robertso Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
[Toronto] : Tundra Books [2021]
Language
English
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Issued also in electronic format
ISBN
9780735266681
0735266689
Main Author
David Robertson, 1977- (author)
Other Authors
Julie Flett (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

The creators of When We Were Alone (2017) team up here to highlight a traditional Indigenous experience. A young boy and his moshom (grandfather) travel far to the north (by plane, by truck, by motorboat, and on foot) to reach the site of Moshom's trapline. The older man describes how he and his family slept together in a tent in the years when they trapped animals, gathered berries, and fished in order to sustain themselves. The muskrats trapped, for example, provided food, while their pelts were sold to purchase supplies that couldn't be gleaned from the land. This succinct narrative emphasizes both the natural beauty of the wilderness and the satisfaction experienced from this lifestyle. Robertson also underscores traditional Indigenous values, including sharing with those in need and learning from the land. Flett's digitally enhanced pastel-on-paper illustrations employ a palette of greens, blues, and browns, often accented in red. Her use of simple shapes, textured patterns, and subtle shadings allows the landscapes and characters to shine. Appended with creator notes and a glossary of Cree words. Grades K-3. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The Indigenous creators behind Governor General's Award–winning When We Were Alone return for this grandparent-child exploration of traplines, "where people hunt animals and live off the land." Robertson, who has Swampy Cree heritage, follows Moshom, a Swampy Cree Elder, who guides his grandchild through the trapline—as well as through memories of his time there as a child. In a deceptively simple, conversational tone, the child relays observations alongside their grandfather's poignant recollections, offering a Swampy Cree word at the bottom of almost every page: "I ask Moshom what it was like going to school after living on the trapline.... ‘I learned in both places,' he says. ‘I just learned different things.'/ Pahkan means ‘different.'?" Flett (who is Cree-Métis) employs a naturalistic color palette for the simple, generously spaced geometric illustrations of light brown-skinned figures, rendered in pastel on paper, then composited digitally. A deeply affecting journey of memory and history. Ages 4–8. (May) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"A boy and Moshom, his grandpa, take a trip together to visit a place of great meaning to Moshom. A trapline is where people hunt and live off the land, and it was where Moshom grew up. As they embark on their northern journey, the child repeatedly asks his grandfather, "Is this your trapline?" This is a heartfelt story about memory, imagination and intergenerational connection that perfectly captures the experience of a young child's wonder as he is introduced to places and stories that hold meaning forhis family"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A picture book celebrating Indigenous culture and traditions. The Governor General Award--winning team behind When We Were Alone shares a story that honors our connections to our past and our grandfathers and fathers.

A boy and Moshom, his grandpa, take a trip together to visit a place of great meaning to Moshom. A trapline is where people hunt and live off the land, and it was where Moshom grew up. As they embark on their northern journey, the child repeatedly asks his grandfather, "Is this your trapline?" Along the way, the boy finds himself imagining what life was like two generations ago -- a life that appears to be both different from and similar to his life now. This is a heartfelt story about memory, imagination and intergenerational connection that perfectly captures the experience of a young child's wonder as he is introduced to places and stories that hold meaning for his family.