Lucky girl

Jamie Pacton, 1979-

Book - 2021

"58,642,129. That's how many dollars seventeen-year-old-Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot. It's also about how many reasons she has for not coming forward to claim her prize. Problem #1: Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she'll either have to forfeit the ticket, or worse... Problem #2: Let her hoarder mother cash it. The last thing Jane's mom needs is millions of dollars to buy more junk. Then... Problem ...#3: Jane's best friend, aspiring journalist Brandon Kim, declares on the news that he's going to find the lucky winner. It's one thing to keep her secret from the town - it's another thing entirely to lie to her best friend. Especially when... Problem #4: Jane's ex-boyfriend, Holden, is suddenly back in her life, and he has big ideas about what he'd do with the prize money. As suspicion and jealousy turn neighbor against neighbor, and no good options for cashing the ticket come forward, Jane begins to wonder: Could this much money actually be a bad thing?" -- Jacket flap.

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Subjects
Genres
Young adult fiction
Novels
Published
Salem, MA : Page Street Publishing 2021.
Language
English
Physical Description
236 pages ; 22 cm
ISBN
9781645672081
1645672085
Main Author
Jamie Pacton, 1979- (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

The unfortunately named Fortuna Jane Belleweather, who'd much rather be called Jane, is about to be a multi-millionaire—maybe. Right before geometry class, she finds out that the lottery ticket she bought has the winning numbers. But there's one problem (or maybe three): she's not 18, so she can't claim the prize. Her mom, still mourning her dad's death, is irresponsible when it comes to money, so who knows where the 58 million dollars would go. And Jane's best friend, Brandon, who dreams of making it big on CNN, wants to dig up the lotto winner and break the story. Complicating matters further is Jane's ex-boyfriend Holden, who's recently become an expert on finance thanks to his Future Investors of America club. Holden's making Jane nervous on many levels, not least because their romance, which she once thought was doomed, seems to be showing signs of life. This contemporary novel remains wonderfully true to its world and its characters throughout. Recommend to fans of Jennifer E. Smith's Windfall (2017). Grades 9-12. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 8 Up—Jane might just be the luckiest girl alive. At least, that is what people might assume after a throwaway dollar turns into the sole winning ticket for a $58,643,129 lottery jackpot. But things are never so simple. Jane technically bought the ticket when she was a minor, which means she needs to get an adult to claim the money for her. She could give it to her mom, but ever since her dad died, her mom has started collecting other people's junk. Jane's ex-boyfriend is legally an adult, and he seems to want to get back together—maybe he is an option? Meanwhile, Jane has to keep everything top secret because her best friend Bran is determined to figure out who in their small town had their life changed by a lucky ticket. Jane is a relatable protagonist and the reasons for her drawn-out decisions are logical (if sometimes frustrating). Her relationship with Bran holds the book together while also centering a strong platonic friendship across genders. Pacton falters a little in her handling of Jane's mother's mental health—Jane struggles to talk to her mom for so long that it feels unlikely that one conversation would push them so far down a healing path. Jane is white and bisexual and Bran is Korean. VERDICT A sweet, thoughtful, and quick romp, perfect for readers wanting some laughs while also looking for answers to some of life's biggest questions about love, death, self-worth, and, of course, money.—Annamarie Carlson, Westerville P.L., OH Copyright 2021 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot [with]...many reasons...for not coming forward to claim her prize...Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she'll..have to forfeit the ticket...Let her hoarder mother cash it. The last thing Jane's mom needs is millions of dollars to buy more junk. Then...Jane's ex-boyfriend, Holden, is suddenly back in her life, and he has big ideas about what he'd do with the prize money"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A hilarious and poignant reflection on what money can and cannot fix58,642,129. That’s how many dollars seventeen-year-old Fortuna Jane Belleweather just won in the lotto jackpot. It’s also about how many reasons she has for not coming forward to claim her prize.Problem #1: Jane is still a minor, and if anyone discovers she bought the ticket underage, she’ll either have to forfeit the ticket, or worse . . .Problem #2: Let her hoarder mother cash it. The last thing Jane’s mom needs is millions of dollars to buy more junk. Then . . .Problem #3: Jane’s best friend, aspiring journalist Brandon Kim, declares on the news that he’s going to find the lucky winner. It’s one thing to keep her secret from the town — it’s another thing entirely to lie to her best friend. Especially when . . .Problem #4: Jane’s ex-boyfriend, Holden, is suddenly back in her life, and he has big ideas about what he’d do with the prize money. As suspicion and jealousy turn neighbor against neighbor, and no good options for cashing the ticket come forward, Jane begins to wonder: Could this much money actually be a bad thing