The heartbeat of trees Embracing our ancient bond with forests and nature

Peter Wohlleben, 1964-

Book - 2021

"In an era of cell phone addiction and ever-expanding cities, many of us fear we've lost our connection to nature--but Peter Wohlleben is convinced that age-old ties linking humans to the forest remain alive and intact. Whether we observe it or not, our blood pressure stabilizes near trees, the color green calms us, and the forest sharpens our senses. Drawing on new scientific discoveries, The Heartbeat of Trees reveals the profound interactions humans can have with nature, exploring t...he language of the forest, the consciousness of plants, and the eroding boundary between flora and fauna. Wohlleben shares how to see, feel, smell, hear, and even taste your journey into the woods. Above all, he reveals a wondrous cosmos where humans are a part of nature, and where conservation is not just about saving trees--it's about saving ourselves, too."--

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2nd Floor 582.16/Wohlleben Due Oct 28, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Essays
Published
Vancouver ; Berkeley : Greystone Books 2021.
Language
English
German
Item Description
Translation of: Das geheime Band zwischen Mensch und Natur.
Physical Description
258 pages ; 23 cm
Issued also in electronic format
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781771646895
1771646896
Main Author
Peter Wohlleben, 1964- (author)
Other Authors
Jane Billinghurst, 1958- (translator)
  • Why is the forest green?
  • Giving your hearing a workout in nature
  • Your gut's amazing sense of smell
  • Nature doesn't always taste good
  • Touch helps us think
  • Training your sixth sense
  • Fear in the forest
  • We are better than we think
  • In close contact with trees
  • In the beginning was fire
  • Electric trees
  • The heartbeat of trees
  • When earthworms travel
  • The sacred tree
  • The disappearing boundary between animals and plants
  • The language of the forest
  • Diving deep into the forest
  • First aid from nature's medicine cabinet
  • When a tree needs a doctor
  • Everything under control?
  • Our longing for an intact world
  • Learning from children
  • The paradox of city and country living
  • Trees, too, are followers of fashion
  • The long, hard road back
  • Confronting climate change
  • Good things take time
  • In search of both the future and the past
  • Problems highlighted by Białowieża
  • Hambi is here to stay
  • Strengthening our bond with nature.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Forester turned ecologist and educator Wohlleben follows his best-selling Mysteries of Nature series—The Hidden Life of Trees, 2016; The Inner Life of Animals, 2017; The Secret Wisdom of Nature, 2019—with a return to the wonders of trees. Part of what one might call the "awaken awe" school of nature writing, Wohlleben amiably explains how our "ancient bond" with trees is evident in the evolution of our senses and in the many ways a walk in the forest is so beneficial for our health. He presents the latest scientific findings illuminating how trees communicate, respond to their surroundings, and feel pain, and how their pumping of water at regular intervals creates "heartbeats." As Wohlleben visits primeval forests in Europe and North America, he sharply contrasts them with tree plantations, decries clear-cutting, cites the many threats against old-growth forests, and elucidates precisely why true forests are "our most powerful allies in the fight against climate change." By celebrating the complex interconnectivity of forests and how they sustain so many life forms, including our own, Wohlleben seeks to summon veneration, empathy, and advocacy for trees. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

The best selling author of The Hidden Life of Trees revisits a favorite subject. While Hidden Life focused on arboreal wonders, Wohlleben's new book (originally published in Germany in 2019) is as much about human life as it is about trees. Humanity's bond with nature has not been severed, Wohlleben claims, just forgotten. In his trademark conversational style, he explains why we feel good around trees and how, by opening our senses, we can benefit from them. The book's rambling form, appropriately, is like a walk in the woods: 31 short chapters or essays cover diverse topics, including our historical connections to trees, trees' electrical fields, forest bathing, invasive species, climate change, and more. Along the way, Wohlleben takes some jabs at conservative science, industrial forestry, and greenwashing in its many guises. He urges hope, not despair, about our environmental malaise, and closes with a message: laws and regulations won't save our forest friends, but we can, if only we can reconnect with nature through empathy. VERDICT Finding "fascinating phenomena all over the place," Wohlleben sticks with the formula that made his earlier work so popular. This latest book will appeal to fans of popular science and anyone curious about natural history.—Robert Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont. Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Forester Wohlleben (The Hidden Life of Trees) takes an eclectic look at humanity's relationships with trees in this heartfelt survey. To prove that "the ancient tie that binds humans and nature exists to this day and is as strong as ever," Wohlleben looks at tree worship (including the "marriage of trees" ritual in Italy), common expressions such as "shaking like a leaf," and the various ways humans use products derived from plants for medication (willow tree bark helps with headaches, for example). He also notes traits shared between plants and humans: a South American vine can see, he argues, as it creates leaves exactly like those of its host tree, and he offers evidence that spruce trees feel pain when attacked by bark beetles. Paramount to Wohlleben is the role forests play in the health of nature and civilization—he mourns the destruction of diverse old-growth forests, and decries modern forestry's single species "plantations," where endless cycles of planting, thinning, and clear-cutting destroy the very meaning of forest. Along the way, moving accounts of fellow activists' efforts to save treasured woodlands bolster his plea that humans should let forests return to their natural state. Nature-minded readers will enjoy this episodic deep dive. (June) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Forester Wohlleben (The Hidden Life of Trees) takes an eclectic look at humanity's relationships with trees in this heartfelt survey. To prove that "the ancient tie that binds humans and nature exists to this day and is as strong as ever," Wohlleben looks at tree worship (including the "marriage of trees" ritual in Italy), common expressions such as "shaking like a leaf," and the various ways humans use products derived from plants for medication (willow tree bark helps with headaches, for example). He also notes traits shared between plants and humans: a South American vine can see, he argues, as it creates leaves exactly like those of its host tree, and he offers evidence that spruce trees feel pain when attacked by bark beetles. Paramount to Wohlleben is the role forests play in the health of nature and civilization—he mourns the destruction of diverse old-growth forests, and decries modern forestry's single species "plantations," where endless cycles of planting, thinning, and clear-cutting destroy the very meaning of forest. Along the way, moving accounts of fellow activists' efforts to save treasured woodlands bolster his plea that humans should let forests return to their natural state. Nature-minded readers will enjoy this episodic deep dive. (June) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Drawing on science and cutting-edge research, a renowned forester proves that, despite an era of cell phone addiction, climate change and urban life, the age-old ties linking humans to the forest remain alive and intact.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Thirty-one essays examine new scientific discoveries to show how humans are deeply connected to the natural world, in an era of climate change, where many of us fear we have lost our connection to nature.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, THE HIDDEN LIFE OF TREESA powerful return to the forest, where trees have heartbeats and roots are like brains that extend underground. Where the color green calms us, and the forest sharpens our senses.In The Heartbeat of Trees, renowned forester Peter Wohlleben draws on new scientific discoveries to show how humans are deeply connected to the natural world.In an era of cell phone addiction, climate change, and urban life, many of us fear we’ve lost our connection to nature—but Peter Wohlleben is convinced that age-old ties linking humans to the forest remain alive and intact.Drawing on science and cutting-edge research, The Heartbeat of Trees reveals the profound interactions humans can have with nature, exploring:the language of the forestthe consciousness of plantsand the eroding boundary between flora and fauna. A perfect book to take with you into the woods, The Heartbeat of Trees shares how to see, feel, smell, hear, and even taste the forest.Peter Wohlleben, renowned for his ability to write about trees in an engaging and moving way, reveals a wondrous cosmos where humans are a part of nature, and where conservation and environmental activism is not just about saving trees—it’s about saving ourselves, too.Praise for The Heartbeat of Trees“As human beings, we’re desperate to feel that we’re not alone in the universe. And yet we are surrounded by an ongoing conversation that we can sense if, as Peter Wohlleben so movingly prescribes, we listen to the heartbeat of all life.” —Richard Louv, author of Our Wild Calling and Last Child in the Woods“Astonishment after astonishment—that is the great gift of The Heartbeat of Trees. It is both a celebration of the wonders of trees, and a howl of outrage at how recklessly we profane them.” —Kathleen Dean Moore, author of Earth’s Wild Music“As Peter Wohlleben reminds us in The Heartbeat of Trees, trees are the vocabulary of nature as forests are the brainbank of a living planet. This was the codex of the ancient world, and it must be the fine focus of our future.” —Dr. Diana Beresford-Kroeger, author of To Speak for the Trees and The Global Forest“Peter Wohlleben knows the battle that lies before us: forging a closer relationship with nature before we destroy it. In The Heartbeat of Trees he takes us deep into the global forest to show us how.”—Jim Robbins, author of The Man Who Planted Trees

Review by Publisher Summary 4

FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, THE HIDDEN LIFE OF TREESA powerful return to the forest, where trees have heartbeats and roots are like brains that extend underground. Where the color green calms us, and the forest sharpens our senses.In The Heartbeat of Trees, renowned forester Peter Wohlleben draws on new scientific discoveries to show how humans are deeply connected to the natural world. In an era of climate change, many of us fear we've lost our connection to nature'but Peter Wohlleben is convinced that age-old ties linking humans to the forest remain alive and intact. We just have to know where to look.Drawing on science and cutting-edge research, The Heartbeat of Trees reveals the profound interactions humans can have with nature, exploring:the language of the forestthe consciousness of plantsand the eroding boundary between flora and fauna. A perfect book to take with you into the woods, The Heartbeat of Trees shares how to see, feel, smell, hear, and even taste the forest.Peter Wohlleben, renowned for his ability to write about trees in an engaging and moving way, reveals a wondrous cosmos where humans are a part of nature, and where conservation and environmental activism is not just about saving trees'it's about saving ourselves, too.Praise for The Heartbeat of Trees"As human beings, we're desperate to feel that we're not alone in the universe. And yet we are surrounded by an ongoing conversation that we can sense if, as Peter Wohlleben so movingly prescribes, we listen to the heartbeat of all life.' 'Richard Louv, author of Our Wild Calling and Last Child in the Woods"Astonishment after astonishment'that is the great gift of The Heartbeat of Trees. It is both a celebration of the wonders of trees, and a howl of outrage at how recklessly we profane them.' 'Kathleen Dean Moore, author of Earth's Wild Music"As Peter Wohlleben reminds us in The Heartbeat of Trees, trees are the vocabulary of nature as forests are the brainbank of a living planet. This was the codex of the ancient world, and it must be the fine focus of our future.' 'Dr. Diana Beresford-Kroeger, author of To Speak for the Trees and The Global Forest"Peter Wohlleben knows the battle that lies before us: forging a closer relationship with nature before we destroy it. In The Heartbeat of Trees he takes us deep into the global forest to show us how.''Jim Robbins, author of The Man Who Planted Trees