Tokyo ever after

Emiko Jean

Book - 2021

After learning that her father is the Crown Prince of Japan, Izumi travels to Tokyo, where she discovers that Japanese imperial life--complete with designer clothes, court intrigue, paparazzi scandals, and a forbidden romance with her handsome but stoic bodyguard--is a tough fit for the outspoken and irreverent eighteen-year-old from northern California.

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YOUNG ADULT FICTION/Jean Emiko
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Series
Jean, Emiko. Tokyo ever after ; 1.
Reese's book club.
Subjects
Genres
Young adult fiction
Published
New York : Flatiron Books 2021.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Item Description
Series information from Goodreads. Book club information from jacket.
Physical Description
322 pages : genealogy chart ; 22 cm
Audience
Ages 12-18.
ISBN
9781250766601
1250766605
9781250818317
1250818311
Main Author
Emiko Jean (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Izumi has never known her father, but she has a close and healthy relationship with her Japanese American biology-professor mother, and she accepts her mother's story of a one-night stand with a visiting Japanese student while finishing her degree at Harvard to account for her origin. When a friend of Izumi's figures out that her dad is actually the Crown Prince of Japan, Izumi reaches out to him, but after the press uncovers the secret, nothing is ever the same. Comparisons will be drawn to Meg Cabot's Princess Diaries, but Jean explores an entirely new element, as Izumi struggles to adapt to a homogenous society where, although she may look like both royals and commoners, she is clearly an outsider. Jean also nails the feeling of being a minority in a small rural Northern Californian town, with the comfort of her AGG (Asian Girl Gang—with the three other Asian girls in her town), as well as her ambivalence and discomfort in exploring Japanese traditions during her time abroad. Text messages and newspaper articles are clever ways to advance plot while communicating tone and culture. There's a requisite romance with taciturn bodyguard Akio, and the Crown Prince's somewhat unlikely transformation into loving and supportive father, but Jean also busts stereotypes (Izumi is not a star student). A refreshing and spot-on depiction of Japanese Americans exploring their heritage that will appeal to teen Asian girls as well as a wider pool of readers. Grades 8-12. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Izumi has never known her father, but she has a close and healthy relationship with her Japanese American biology-professor mother, and she accepts her mother's story of a one-night stand with a visiting Japanese student while finishing her degree at Harvard to account for her origin. When a friend of Izumi's figures out that her dad is actually the Crown Prince of Japan, Izumi reaches out to him, but after the press uncovers the secret, nothing is ever the same. Comparisons will be drawn to Meg Cabot's Princess Diaries, but Jean explores an entirely new element, as Izumi struggles to adapt to a homogenous society where, although she may look like both royals and commoners, she is clearly an outsider. Jean also nails the feeling of being a minority in a small rural Northern Californian town, with the comfort of her AGG (Asian Girl Gang—with the three other Asian girls in her town), as well as her ambivalence and discomfort in exploring Japanese traditions during her time abroad. Text messages and newspaper articles are clever ways to advance plot while communicating tone and culture. There's a requisite romance with taciturn bodyguard Akio, and the Crown Prince's somewhat unlikely transformation into loving and supportive father, but Jean also busts stereotypes (Izumi is not a star student). A refreshing and spot-on depiction of Japanese Americans exploring their heritage that will appeal to teen Asian girls as well as a wider pool of readers. Grades 8-12. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 8 Up—Izumi, a Japanese American high school student, has a pretty average life: a band of awesome misfit friends, a delicious diner where she's a regular, and a loving mother—everything a high school senior needs. Or is it? Her father's identity has always been a mystery her mother has refused to discuss beyond that he was simply a one-night stand in college. One day Izumi accidentally learns his name, her first real clue to his whereabouts. Her friend researches the name and everything starts spiraling…until Izumi is in Japan with the knowledge that her father is the Crown Prince. Not only that, here she is, in Japan with the entire country's eyes staring straight at her. The whiplash from such a fast time line hits Izumi hard. Is this her chance to find where she really feels at home or will finding out her mother's secret ruin everything? Told from Izumi's point of view, the story explores the deep feelings of loneliness BIPOC children sometimes feel when they are the minority within their American town and have little connection to their ancestors' birth country. Izumi's determined spirit and character arc will endear readers to her. Vibrant descriptions of Japan and Izumi's reactions feel cheesy but truly realistic, capturing all of the fear, excitement, and admiration one could have when visiting a country with a different culture than their own. Izumi is a fully realized protagonist whom teens will find relatable. VERDICT A fun experience that readers will want to read again and again.—DeHanza Kwong, Butte P.L., MT Copyright 2021 School Library Journal.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 8 Up—Izumi, a Japanese American high school student, has a pretty average life: a band of awesome misfit friends, a delicious diner where she's a regular, and a loving mother—everything a high school senior needs. Or is it? Her father's identity has always been a mystery her mother has refused to discuss beyond that he was simply a one-night stand in college. One day Izumi accidentally learns his name, her first real clue to his whereabouts. Her friend researches the name and everything starts spiraling…until Izumi is in Japan with the knowledge that her father is the Crown Prince. Not only that, here she is, in Japan with the entire country's eyes staring straight at her. The whiplash from such a fast time line hits Izumi hard. Is this her chance to find where she really feels at home or will finding out her mother's secret ruin everything? Told from Izumi's point of view, the story explores the deep feelings of loneliness BIPOC children sometimes feel when they are the minority within their American town and have little connection to their ancestors' birth country. Izumi's determined spirit and character arc will endear readers to her. Vibrant descriptions of Japan and Izumi's reactions feel cheesy but truly realistic, capturing all of the fear, excitement, and admiration one could have when visiting a country with a different culture than their own. Izumi is a fully realized protagonist whom teens will find relatable. VERDICT A fun experience that readers will want to read again and again.—DeHanza Kwong, Butte P.L., MT Copyright 2021 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

After learning that her father is the Crown Prince of Japan, Izumi travels to Tokyo, where she discovers that Japanese imperial life--complete with designer clothes, court intrigue, paparazzi scandals, and a forbidden romance with her handsome but stoic bodyguard--is a tough fit for the outspoken and irreverant eighteen-year-old from northern California.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Discovering in her senior year of high school that the father she has never met is the Crown Prince of Japan, Izzy is introduced to the realities of being a princess while trying to understand conniving relatives, a hungry press, a handsome bodyguard and thousands of years of tradition. 250,000 first printing. Simultaneous eBook.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The New York Times bestseller and Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine YA Book Club Pick! Emiko Jean’s Tokyo Ever After is the “refreshing, spot-on” (Booklist, starred review) story of an ordinary Japanese American girl who discovers that her father is the Crown Prince of JapanIzumi Tanaka has never really felt like she fit in—it isn’t easy being Japanese American in her small, mostly white, northern California town. Raised by a single mother, it’s always been Izumi—or Izzy, because “It’s easier this way”—and her mom against the world. But then Izumi discovers a clue to her previously unknown father’s identity…and he’s none other than the Crown Prince of Japan. Which means outspoken, irreverent Izzy is literally a princess.In a whirlwind, Izumi travels to Japan to meet the father she never knew and discover the country she always dreamed of. But being a princess isn’t all ball gowns and tiaras. There are conniving cousins, a hungry press, a scowling but handsome bodyguard who just might be her soulmate, and thousands of years of tradition and customs to learn practically overnight.Izumi soon finds herself caught between worlds, and between versions of herself—back home, she was never “American” enough, and in Japan, she must prove she’s “Japanese” enough. Will Izumi crumble under the weight of the crown, or will she live out her fairy tale, happily ever after?Look for the sequel, Tokyo Dreaming, in 2022!