Three simple lines A writer's pilgrimage into the heart and homeland of haiku

Natalie Goldberg

Book - 2021

"An autobiographical meditation on the writing and reading of haiku, the essence of haiku mind, and the country and culture that nurtured the form"--

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2nd Floor 811.6/Goldberg Due Aug 19, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Lyric poetry
Published
Novato, California : New World Library [2021]
Language
English
Physical Description
161 pages ; 22 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 157-159).
ISBN
9781608686971
1608686973
Main Author
Natalie Goldberg (author)
  • Nothing less than God
  • Sawdust, gruel, and mochi
  • Full and shattered bowls
  • Snow falls
  • Water, earth, light
  • This is impossible
  • Two autumns
  • A fan
  • What you want to see
  • A very tender way
  • The way of haiku
  • The fall
  • Infinite light
  • Something much wilder
  • Wanting to see
  • Turning
  • The sound of water
  • Epilogue: another world.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Venerated writing teacher, writer, and artist Goldberg dispenses personal stories and literary and Zen Buddhist wisdom in books notable for their warmth, candor, and lucidity. Here she shares her immersion in haiku, a form Allen Ginsberg introduced her to when she was a student. Goldberg states, "Haiku is a refuge when the world seems chaotic," as it does now, and, indeed, the way she showcases haiku, both classic and new, while recounting her adventures in Japan as she followed the footsteps of the haiku masters—Basho, Buson, Issa, Shiki—proves to be stress-reducing, stimulating, and replenishing. The essence of haiku, Goldberg notes, is "pure awareness," while its three lines should "make the mind leap." Goldberg deepens appreciation for the evolution of the form by telling tales of the master's lives and reclaiming the key contributions of an overlooked woman practitioner, Chiyo-ni. Goldberg's participation in a haiku writing group at her Santa Fe library, her fish-out-of-water moments in Japan, and her sense of humor and humility converge in a uniquely intimate celebration of haiku and its distillation of life's beauty and transience. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"An autobiographical meditation on the writing and reading of haiku, the essence of haiku mind, and the country and culture that nurtured the form"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The author of Writing Down the Bones explores the history and literary experience of haiku, citing the works of such masters as Basho and Issa while inviting readers to experience the form’s evocative capacity for advancing spiritual enlightenment.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

One of the world's foremost writing teachers invites readers on a joyful journey into the reading and origins of haiku A haiku is three simple lines. But it is also, as Allen Ginsberg put it, three lines that 'make the mind leap.' A good one, he said, lets the mind experience 'a small sensation of space which is nothing less than God.' As many spiritual practices seek to do, the haiku's spare yet acute noticing of the immediate and often ordinary grounds the reader in the pure awareness of now. Natalie Goldberg is a delightfully companionable tour guide into this world. She highlights the history of the form, dating back to the seventeenth century; shows why masters such as Basho and Issa are so revered; discovers Chiyo-ni, an important woman haiku master; and provides insight into writing and reading haiku. A fellow seeker who travels to Japan to explore the birthplace of haiku, Goldberg revels in everything she encounters, including food and family, painting and fashion, frogs and ponds. She also experiences and allows readers to share in the spontaneous and profound moments of enlightenment and awakening that haiku promises.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

One of the world's foremost writing teachers invites readers on a joyful journey into the reading and origins of haiku

Review by Publisher Summary 5

One of the world’s foremost writing teachers invites readers on a joyful journey into the reading and origins of haiku A haiku is three simple lines. But it is also, as Allen Ginsberg put it, three lines that “make the mind leap.” A good one, he said, lets the mind experience “a small sensation of space which is nothing less than God.” As many spiritual practices seek to do, the haiku’s spare yet acute noticing of the immediate and often ordinary grounds the reader in the pure awareness of now. Natalie Goldberg is a delightfully companionable tour guide into this world. She highlights the history of the form, dating back to the seventeenth century; shows why masters such as Basho and Issa are so revered; discovers Chiyo-ni, an important woman haiku master; and provides insight into writing and reading haiku. A fellow seeker who travels to Japan to explore the birthplace of haiku, Goldberg revels in everything she encounters, including food and family, painting and fashion, frogs and ponds. She also experiences and allows readers to share in the spontaneous and profound moments of enlightenment and awakening that haiku promises.