Empire of resentment Populism's toxic embrace of nationalism

Lawrence Rosenthal, 1949-

Book - 2020

"Since Trump's victory and the UK's Brexit vote, much of the commentary on the populist epidemic has focused on the emergence of populism. But, Lawrence Rosenthal argues, what is happening globally is not the emergence but the transformation of right-wing populism. Rosenthal, the founder of UC Berkeley's Center for Right-Wing Studies, suggests right-wing populism is a protean force whose prime mover is the resentment felt toward perceived elites, and whose abiding feature is ...its ideological flexibility, which now takes the form of xenophobic nationalism. In 2016, American right-wing populists migrated from the free marketeering Tea Party to Donald Trump's "hard hat," anti-immigrant, America-First nationalism. This was the most important single factor in Trump's electoral victory. In Italy, for example, the Northern League reinvented itself in 2018 as an all-Italy party, switching its fury from southerners to immigrants, and came to power. Rosenthal paints a vivid sociological, political, and psychological picture of the transnational quality of this movement, which is now in power in at least a dozen countries, creating a de facto Nationalist International. The future of democratic politics in the United States and abroad depends on whether right-wing populists stay with this nationalist ideology and whether the liberal and left parties have the political capacity to effect a progressive populism of their own"--

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

320.5662/Rosenthal
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 320.5662/Rosenthal Checked In
Subjects
Published
New York : The New Press [2020]
Language
English
Physical Description
300 pages ; 23 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781620975107
1620975106
Main Author
Lawrence Rosenthal, 1949- (author)
  • The ideological migration of 2016
  • The Tea Party: right populism with a Koch-Brothers mask
  • The great irony: how Trump split the Tea Party and won the 2016 Republican nomination
  • Othering nationalism: the (bookend) revolution of 2016
  • The road to the tiki torches: the blurry convergence of alienation and white nationalism
  • (Grayed-out) Illiberalism: the road taken.
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Rosenthal (coeditor, Steep: The Precipitous Rise of the Tea Party), the chair of U.C. Berkeley's Center for Right-Wing Studies, dissects the migration of America's "right-wing populists" from the Tea Party to Donald Trump in this cogent and troubling account. During the 2016 campaign, Rosenthal writes, Trump rode anti-immigrant sentiment to harness the anger of rank-and-file voters who felt they had been betrayed by the Republican establishment during the Obama years. Along the way, the fiscal conservatism that drove the Tea Party movement was left curbside as Trump abandoned neoconservative policies on free trade and foreign affairs. Rosenthal finds parallels to Trump's presidency in the rise of Italian fascism, early 20th-century nationalistic movements, and illiberal governments in present-day Eastern Europe. The populist nationalism behind Trump's appeal and similar developments in Hungary, Poland, and Russia, Rosenthal contends, is driven by opposition to the "common other" (immigrants and refugees) and the forging of a "common identity" in traditional values, religion, and "whiteness." While he stops short of saying that the U.S. is currently threatened by a fascist takeover, Rosenthal is not sanguine about the nation's future prospects, hypothesizing about the dangers that a populist leader more competent than Trump would present. Rosenthal's incendiary claims are supported with copious evidence. Frightening and informative, this lucid exposé makes a strong case that American democracy is under threat. (Sept.) Copyright 2020 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Since Trump's victory and the UK's Brexit vote, much of the commentary on the populist epidemic has focused on the emergence of populism. But, Lawrence Rosenthal argues, what is happening globally is not the emergence but the transformation of right-wing populism. Rosenthal, the founder of UC Berkeley's Center for Right-Wing Studies, suggests right-wing populism is a protean force whose prime mover is the resentment felt toward perceived elites, and whose abiding feature is its ideological flexibility, which now takes the form of xenophobic nationalism. In 2016, American right-wing populists migrated from the free marketeering Tea Party to Donald Trump's "hard hat," anti-immigrant, America-First nationalism. This was the most important single factor in Trump's electoral victory. In Italy, for example, the Northern League reinvented itself in 2018 as an all-Italy party, switching its fury from southerners to immigrants, and came to power. Rosenthal paints a vivid sociological, political, and psychological picture of the transnational quality of this movement, which is now in power in at least a dozen countries, creating a de facto Nationalist International. The future of democratic politics in the United States and abroad depends on whether right-wing populists stay with this nationalist ideology and whether the liberal and left parties have the political capacity to effect a progressive populism of their own"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A leading conservative scholar examines the transformation of right-wing populism in the Trump era from a free-market economic stance exemplified by the Tea Party into a xenophobic movement based on an anti-immigrant American-first nationalist philosophy.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

From a leading scholar on conservatism, the extraordinary chronicle of how the transformation of the American far right made the Trump presidency possible—and what it portends for the futureSince Trump's victory and the UK's Brexit vote, much of the commentary on the populist epidemic has focused on the emergence of populism. But, Lawrence Rosenthal argues, what is happening globally is not the emergence but the transformation of right-wing populism.Rosenthal, the founder of UC Berkeley's Center for Right-Wing Studies, suggests right-wing populism is a protean force whose prime mover is the resentment felt toward perceived cultural elites, and whose abiding feature is its ideological flexibility, which now takes the form of xenophobic nationalism. In 2016, American right-wing populists migrated from the free marketeering Tea Party to Donald Trump's "hard hat," anti-immigrant, America-First nationalism. This was the most important single factor in Trump's electoral victory and it has been at work across the globe. In Italy, for example, the Northern League reinvented itself in 2018 as an all-Italy party, switching its fury from southerners to immigrants, and came to power.Rosenthal paints a vivid sociological, political, and psychological picture of the transnational quality of this movement, which is now in power in at least a dozen countries, creating a de facto Nationalist International. In America and abroad, the current mobilization of right-wing populism has given life to long marginalized threats like white supremacy. The future of democratic politics in the United States and abroad depends on whether the liberal and left parties have the political capacity to mobilize with a progressive agenda of their own.