Wedding station

David Downing, 1946-

Book - 2021

"Germany, 1933. The world is not yet at war, but the influence of the Nazi party is spreading like wildfire through Berlin. The prequel to the bestselling Station series introduces us to John Russell, an Englishman with a political past who must keep his head down as the Nazis solidify their power. The Reichstag parliament building has burned down, just four weeks after Hitler's appointment as German Chancellor. The torching will be used to justify the Nazi reign which followed. John R...ussell's recent separation from his wife is threatening his right to reside in Germany, and any meaningful relationship with his six year-old son Paul. He has just secured work as a crime reporter on a Berlin newspaper, and three of the stories with which he becomes involved--the gruesome murder of a rent boy, the apparently accidental running over of a professional genealogist, the suspicious disappearance of a Nazi-supporting celebrity fortune-teller--may not look alike in any way, but are seemingly connected. All these investigations carry the risk of Russell falling foul of the authorities at a time when the rule of law has completely vanished and the Nazis are running scores of pop-up detention centres complete with torture chambers in every corner of Berlin"--

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1st Floor FICTION/Downing David Checked In
Series
The John Russell series ; 7
Subjects
Genres
Historical fiction
Mystery fiction
Published
New York, NY : Soho Crime [2021]
Language
English
Physical Description
325 pages ; 24 cm
ISBN
9781641291071
1641291079
Main Author
David Downing, 1946- (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Downing's Station series, named after various stops on Berlin's U-Bahn mass-transit system, moves back in time with an evocative prequel that begins with the Reichstag fire in 1933, four weeks after Hitler became chancellor of Germany. Former communist John Russell, the half-English, half-American series hero, is working as a crime reporter for a liberal Berlin newspaper, separated from his wife but hoping to spend as much time as possible with his young son, Paul, before the past catches up with him. As Russell works three stories—the murder of a homosexual prostitute, the disappearance of a fortune-teller, and the hit-and-run death of a genealogist—he finds that most criminal activity in Berlin is either perpetrated or sanctioned by the SA, Hitler's paramilitary wing. With the Nazis moving to close down the liberal press, Russell struggles to write the truth without endangering his paper or his life. (Once the existence of facts is denied, he says, everything was a lie . . . but power and the will to use it.) As with many prequels, Wedding Station is ripe with foreshadowing, not only of what is to come for Russell and his loved ones during the war, but also of the larger horrors that are only just beginning. We leave this chillingly resonant novel with the jackboot falling and Russell nursing a resistance of the heart, one that might someday find expression on the streets. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

The prequel to Downing's World War II Berlin-set "Station" series, Wedding Station introduces John Russell, an English crime reporter at a Berlin newspaper whose grim tales of everyday mayhem are increasingly swallowed by the darkness descending upon Germany under new chancellor Hitler. Graham's latest stand-alone, Danger in Numbers, a state police agent links arms with an FBI specialist on cults to solve a ritualistic murder in small-town northern Florida (125,000-copy first printing). In Kayode's Lightseekers, Nigerian investigative psychologist Philip Taiwo travels to a remote town in his country's south to probe the public torture and murder of three university students in what he comes to realize is a lot more than a moment of crowd madness. In her #ownvoices debut, London-based criminal attorney Matheson, of the City University Crime Writing competition, sets DI Anjelica Henley the unenviable task of stopping a criminal imitating The Jigsaw Man before the real hack-up-his-victims killer gets the copycat himself (100,000-copy first printing). In The Red Book, from Patterson and Illinois justice/Edgar Award winner Ellis (Line of Vision), Det. Bill Harney of the Chicago PD's Special Operations Section is fresh on the job and walking the finest of lines when the turmoil surrounding a drive-by shooting turns political (520,000-copy first printing). In Rollins's Kingdom of Bones, Sigma Force faces huge swaths of Africa where the populace has turned quiescent even as plants and animals become cunningly fierce; has the biosphere run amok or is fiendish engineering involved (250,000-copy first printing)? Copyright 2020 Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Germany, 1933. The world is not yet at war, but the influence of the Nazi party is spreading like wildfire through Berlin. The prequel to the bestselling Station series introduces us to John Russell, an Englishman with a political past who must keep hishead down as the Nazis solidify their power. The Reichstag parliament building has burned down, just four weeks after Hitler's appointment as German Chancellor. The torching will be used to justify the Nazi reign which followed. John Russell's recent separation from his wife is threatening his right to reside in Germany, and any meaningful relationship with his six year-old son Paul. He has just secured work as a crime reporter on a Berlin newspaper, and three of the stories with which he becomes involved--the gruesome murder of a rent boy, the apparently accidental running over of a professional genealogist, the suspicious disappearance of a Nazi-supporting celebrity fortune-teller--may not look alike in any way, but are seemingly connected. All these investigations carry the risk of Russell falling foul of the authorities at a time when the rule of law has completely vanished and the Nazis are running scores of pop-up detention centres complete with torture chambers in every corner of Berlin"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A prequel to the best-selling Station series is set a month after Hitler’s inauguration as Chancellor and introduces an English crime reporter with a political past who must avoid Nazi attention to retain custody of his son.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The prequel to David Downing’s bestselling Station series introduces John Russell, an Englishman with a political past who must keep his head down as the Nazis solidify their power.February 27, 1933. In this stunning prequel to the John Russell espionage novels, the Reichstag parliament building in Berlin is set ablaze. It’s just a month after Hitler’s inauguration as Chancellor of Germany, and the Nazis use the torching to justify a campaign of terror against their political opponents. John Russell’s recent separation from his wife threatens his right to reside in Germany and any meaningful relationship with his six-year-old son, Paul. He has just secured work as a crime reporter for a Berlin newspaper, and the crimes which he has to report—the gruesome murder of a rent boy, the hit-and-run death of a professional genealogist, the suspicious disappearance of a Nazi-supporting celebrity fortune-teller—are increasingly entangled in the wider nightmare engulfing Germany. Each new investigation carries the risk of Russell’s falling foul of the authorities, at a time when the rule of law has completely vanished, and the Nazis are running scores of pop-up detention centers, complete with torture chambers, in every corner of Berlin.