Ruthie and the (not so) teeny tiny lie

Laura Rankin

Book - 2007

Ruthie loves tiny things and when she finds a tiny camera on the playground she is very happy, but after she lies and says the camera belongs to her, nothing seems to go right.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Rankin Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Bloomsbury 2007.
Edition
1st U.S. ed
Language
English
Physical Description
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
ISBN
9781599900100
1599900106
Main Author
Laura Rankin (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Ruthie, a fox girl, loves teeny-tiny things, so when she finds a miniature camera in the schoolyard, she claims it as her own. And lies about it when fellow student Martin tells their teacher, Mrs. Olsen, that the camera belongs to Ruthie. The rest of the afternoon is long for Ruthie, and at home that night, she ruminates over her crime until she finally comes clean with her parents. Having been counseled that honesty is the best policy, Ruthie, with much trepidation, tells her teacher and Martin what she has done. Mrs. Olsen praises her for telling the truth, and Martin forgives her, too. A real-life situation might not have such a happy ending, but this gets right to the heart of what children feel when they know they've done something wrong but don't know how to set things right. The sprightly artwork is cheery in all respects, except when it comes to Ruthie. With subtle brushstrokes, Rankin captures all the varied emotions Ruthie goes through: glee, defiance, worry, fear, and eventually relief. Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Like a lot of girls (and girl foxes) in her peer set, Ruthie loves "tiny things—the tinier the better.... She had dinky dinosaurs, itty-bitty trains, ponies no bigger than your pinky, and teddy bears that were barely there." So when Ruthie finds a tiny camera on the playground, she immediately claims it for her own. Her classmate Martin identifies it as his birthday present, but that doesn't deter Ruthie: she lies to her teacher—"I got it for my birthday!" Rankin (Rabbit Ears ) unfolds this highly effective version of a psychological drama with skill and sympathy, using crisp, reportorial pencil-and-acrylic pictures to underscore the emotional and moral stakes. She allows readers to make their own connections to Ruthie's true-to-life feelings of guilt ("The bus ride home took forever.... Dinner was macaroni and cheese, Ruthie's favorite, but she couldn't eat.") and even subtly instructs parents in how to handle a situation like this one. Ages 3-8. (July) [Page 66]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 2— Emotions ring true in this simple tale of learning right from wrong. A young fox loves teeny tiny toys and is delighted when she finds a miniature camera on the school playground. When confronted by the classmate who dropped it, she lets her desires get the better of her and tells the teacher that the camera was a birthday present. Ruthie's growing guilt is heartrendingly displayed in her expression and posture as she forgets the answer to 2+2 and rejects her dinner of macaroni and cheese. When she tells the truth and apologizes, her relief is palpable. Emotionally authentic in text and art, this story gets its message across without preaching. The didactic-sounding title is the book's weakest point, but that's a minor flaw. An excellent choice for bibliotherapy as well as for entertaining reading.—Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL [Page 84]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Ruthie loves tiny things and when she finds a tiny camera on the playground she is very happy, but after she lies and says the camera belongs to her, nothing seems to go right.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Ruthie loves tiny things and when she finds a tiny camera on the playground she is very happy, but after she lies and says the camera belongs to her, nothing seems to go right. 25,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Laura Rankin touches on an important childhood issue of lying with gentleness and humor, offering a reassuring look at how standing up for the truth can help cut even the biggest mistake down to size.Ruthie loves little things-the smaller the better. So when she finds a teeny tiny camera on the school playground one afternoon, she can hardly believe her luck. She wants to keep the camera in the worst way, but there's one little problem: It isn't hers. Ruthie swears to her teacher and to her classmate Martin that she got the camera for her birthday. But deep down, Ruthie knows better, and all day long that teeny tiny camera weighs on her conscience until she can hardly stand it. How could one little camera turn into such a great big problem?