We had to be brave Escaping the Nazis on the Kindertransport

Deborah Hopkinson

Book - 2020

"Ruth David was growing up in a small village in Germany when Adolf Hitler rose to power in the 1930s. Under the Nazi Party, Jewish families like Ruth's experienced rising anti-Semitic restrictions and attacks. Just going to school became dangerous. By November 1938, anti-Semitism erupted into Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, and unleashed a wave of violence and forced arrests. Days later, desperate volunteers sprang into action to organize the Kindertransport, a rescue effort... to bring Jewish children to England. Young people like Ruth David had to say good-bye to their families, unsure if they'd ever be reunited. Miles from home, the Kindertransport refugees entered unrecognizable lives, where food, clothes -- and, for many of them, language and religion -- were startlingly new. Meanwhile, the onset of war and the Holocaust visited unimaginable horrors on loved ones left behind. Somehow, these rescued children had to learn to look forward, to hope. Through the moving and often heart-wrenching personal accounts of Kindertransport survivors, critically acclaimed and award-winning author Deborah Hopkinson paints the timely and devastating story of how the rise of Hitler and the Nazis tore apart the lives of so many families and what they were forced to give up in order to save these children"--

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room j940.531835/Hopkinson Due Jun 11, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Informational works
Published
New York, NY : Scholastic Focus, an imprint of Scholastic Inc 2020.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
xxi, 341 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Audience
Ages 8-12.
Grade 4 to 6.
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781338255720
133825572X
Main Author
Deborah Hopkinson (author)
  • When they burn books : 1925-1938. Before
  • Voices : life before the Nazis
  • Hilter's rise to power
  • The worrying time begins
  • When they burn books
  • When hate becomes law
  • Voices : The signs were all there
  • The tipping point : 1938. The ninth of November
  • Voices : Kristallnacht
  • The tipping point
  • Here is a chance
  • Flight : 1938-1939. Into the unknown
  • Voices : parting
  • Fred's passport
  • Thea's narrow escape
  • Separation and sorrow : 1939 and beyond. Voices : life in a strange land
  • New land, new lives
  • Last transport from Holland
  • The door closes
  • Voices : looking back, moving forward
  • Postscript.
Review by Booklist Reviews

It is common knowledge that six million Jews were murdered by the Nazis during the Holocaust of WWII. What might be less well known is that 10,000 Jewish children were spared that fate, being rescued by the Kindertransport Program which, in 1938 and 1939, took them by train and then boat from Germany to England for new lives with foster families. In her fascinating book about this vital project, Hopkinson shares the stories of many of these children but focuses primarily on three: Ruth Oppenheimer David, Leslie Baruch Brent, and Marianne Josephy Elsley, following the course of their lives from child- to adulthood. Hopkinson divides her book into four chronological sections dealing, respectively, with the rise of Hitler, the momentous Kristalnacht of 1938, the flight of the children, and their subsequent lives in England. Her book is a moving tribute to the organizers of the Kindertransport and to the courage of the children involved. Generously illustrated with black-and-white photographs, the book is extremely well researched and a valuable contribution to Holocaust literature. Grades 4-7. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 7 Up—This captivating narrative of assembled memoirs uses historical details of the Nazis' rise to power and its consequences for European Jews to convey the danger, the emotional cost, and the significance of the Kindertransport (Children's Transport). Hopkinson chronicles the rescue missions that saved young Jewish children from the Holocaust just before the start of World War II and describes the Nazis' systematic and relentless persecution of European Jews that made those rescues necessary. Background information regarding Hitler's rise to power is included, with special attention given to the Kristallnacht violence throughout Germany and the ways that the lives of Jewish families changed in the wake of these riots. Hopkinson's faithful commitment to preserving and broadcasting the voices of as many Kindertransport survivors as possible makes for a rich, dense, and sometimes confusingly detailed narrative. An index, time lines, and source notes will help to orient the reader in the individual stories and provide connections to the broader scope of history. VERDICT This moving account of an important and lesser-known aspect of 20th-century history is recommended for high school and junior high school nonfiction collections.—Kelly Kingrey-Edwards, Blinn Junior College, Brenham, TX Copyright 2020 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Ruth David was growing up in a small village in Germany when Adolf Hitler rose to power in the 1930s. Under the Nazi Party, Jewish families like Ruth's experienced rising anti-Semitic restrictions and attacks. Just going to school became dangerous. By November 1938, anti-Semitism erupted into Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, and unleashed a wave of violence and forced arrests. Days later, desperate volunteers sprang into action to organize the Kindertransport, a rescue effort to bring Jewish children to England. Young people like Ruth David had to say good-bye to their families, unsure if they'd ever be reunited. Miles from home, the Kindertransport refugees entered unrecognizable lives, where food, clothes -- and, for many of them, language and religion -- were startlingly new. Meanwhile, the onset of war and the Holocaust visited unimaginable horrors on loved ones left behind. Somehow, these rescued children had to learn to look forward, to hope. Through the moving and often heart-wrenching personal accounts of Kindertransport survivors, critically acclaimed and award-winning author Deborah Hopkinson paints the timely and devastating story of how the rise of Hitler and the Nazis tore apart the lives of so many families and what they were forced to give up in order to save these children"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Details the heartwrenching experiences of Jewish children who fled Nazi Germany aboard the Kindertransport, in a collection of true accounts that includes the story of young Ruth David, who clung to hope in an unfamiliar country after being separated from her family.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Sibert Honor author Deborah Hopkinson illuminates the true stories of Jewish children who fled Nazi Germany, risking everything to escape to safety on the Kindertransport. An NCTE Orbis Pictus recommended book and a Sydney Taylor Book Award Notable Title.Ruth David was growing up in a small village in Germany when Adolf Hitler rose to power in the 1930s. Under the Nazi Party, Jewish families like Ruth's experienced rising anti-Semitic restrictions and attacks. Just going to school became dangerous. By November 1938, anti-Semitism erupted into Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, and unleashed a wave of violence and forced arrests.Days later, desperate volunteers sprang into action to organize the Kindertransport, a rescue effort to bring Jewish children to England. Young people like Ruth David had to say good-bye to their families, unsure if they'd ever be reunited. Miles from home, the Kindertransport refugees entered unrecognizable lives, where food, clothes -- and, for many of them, language and religion -- were startlingly new. Meanwhile, the onset of war and the Holocaust visited unimaginable horrors on loved ones left behind. Somehow, these rescued children had to learn to look forward, to hope.Through the moving and often heart-wrenching personal accounts of Kindertransport survivors, critically acclaimed and award-winning author Deborah Hopkinson paints the timely and devastating story of how the rise of Hitler and the Nazis tore apart the lives of so many families and what they were forced to give up in order to save these children.