Cool beans The ultimate guide for cooking with the world's most versatile plant-based protein, with 125 recipes

Joe Yonan

Book - 2020

"A modern and fresh look at the diverse world of beans and pulses, including 125 recipes for globally inspired vegetarian mains, snacks, soups, and even desserts"--

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Subjects
Published
California : Ten Speed Press [2020]
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
233 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9780399581489
0399581480
Main Author
Joe Yonan (author)
Other Authors
Aubrie Pick (photographer)
  • Dips, snacks, and appetizers
  • Salads
  • Soups, stews, and soupy side dishes
  • Burgers, sandwiches, wraps, tacos, and a pizza
  • Casseroles, pasta and rice dishes, and hearty main courses
  • Drinks and desserts
  • Condiments and other pantry recipes.
Review by Booklist Reviews

As a vegetarian and food editor of the Washington Post, Yonan (Eat Your Vegetables, 2013) has a fanatical appreciation for beans, an ancient source of nutrition the world over and the only food categorized by the USDA as both protein and vegetable. After an entertaining introduction, an essential overview covers soaking versus not, using canned beans, bean cooking methods including stovetop and pressure cooker, substitutions, and even a page addressing beans' musical quality. Across seven categories—dips and snacks, salads, soups and stews, burgers and sandwiches, casseroles and pastas, drinks and desserts, and condiments—the recipes are easy-going, with narrative introductions and instructions. Most dishes use beans that have been already cooked per the adaptable front-of-book guidelines. Standouts among the many, globally influenced offerings are Ecuadorian lupini bean ceviche, kidney bean and mushroom bourgignon, yellow bean and spinach dosas, a tabbouleh with cannelini beans swapped for bulgur, a vegan coconut cream pie made with navy bean puree, and chocolate mousse made using aquafaba (chickpea liquid). An inspiring tribute to the small but mighty bean. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

As a vegetarian and food editor of the Washington Post, Yonan (Eat Your Vegetables, 2013) has a fanatical appreciation for beans, an ancient source of nutrition the world over and the only food categorized by the USDA as both protein and vegetable. After an entertaining introduction, an essential overview covers soaking versus not, using canned beans, bean cooking methods including stovetop and pressure cooker, substitutions, and even a page addressing beans' musical quality. Across seven categories—dips and snacks, salads, soups and stews, burgers and sandwiches, casseroles and pastas, drinks and desserts, and condiments—the recipes are easy-going, with narrative introductions and instructions. Most dishes use beans that have been already cooked per the adaptable front-of-book guidelines. Standouts among the many, globally influenced offerings are Ecuadorian lupini bean ceviche, kidney bean and mushroom bourgignon, yellow bean and spinach dosas, a tabbouleh with cannelini beans swapped for bulgur, a vegan coconut cream pie made with navy bean puree, and chocolate mousse made using aquafaba (chickpea liquid). An inspiring tribute to the small but mighty bean. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Washington Post food editor Yonan shares his love of beans in 125 often innovative recipes, which include his own take on standards such as bean dips (harissa-roasted carrot and white bean dip stands out), bean salads (updating the traditional three bean salad), and bean soups (dals and fuls join a variety of chilis and baked beans). Hand foods (sandwiches, burgers, wraps, and tacos), casseroles, pasta, rice, drinks, and desserts round out the collSECTION. Throughout, Yonan writes with a sense of humor as he provides information on the various types of beans, how to prepare both dried and canned beans, and strategies for adding beans to one's diet. Included is a list of sources for both beans and spices as well as cooking timetables. Photos are sprinkled throughout the book, but many recipes do not include visuals. Recipes are well laid-out, each with an introduction giving background on the origins, clear dirSECTIONs, and an organized list of ingredients. VERDICT An eclectic collSECTION of recipes, where Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, and Southern American cuisines follow one on the heels of another. For home cooks looking to try something new.—Sharon Mensing, Phoenix, AZ Copyright 2020 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Washington Post food editor Yonan (Eat Your Vegetables) knows legumes and proves it in this enlightening vegetarian collection. He provides thorough information on sourcing (with an enthusiastic shout-out to heirloom bean purveyor Rancho Gordo), cooking (the eternal soaking question: "certainly not a requirement... but can help reduce some of the so-called anti-nutrients"), and eating beans of all varieties, whether canned, fresh, dried, or frozen. The recipes tend to be simple: a chapter on drinks and sweets includes a margarita with aquafaba (canned bean liquid) foam and a white bean and coconut milk smoothie. The most intriguing selections draw on traditions around the globe: Mexican sopes topped with pools of black bean puree; a Georgian bread stuffed with kidney beans; and lima-filled ravioli made with store-bought wonton wrappers. Yonan also pulls from the expertise of others, frequently crediting chefs (Priya Ammu for delicate dosas) and writers (J. Kenji López-Alt for Cuban black beans). Beans aren't always the star, as with a whole roasted head of cauliflower plopped atop hummus and garnished with roasted chickpeas, and pan-fried black lentils scattered on a salad of red gem lettuce. The result is a solid compendium of recipes for legumes of all kinds. (Feb.) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The James Beard Award-winning Washington Post dining editor and author of Eat Your Vegetables draws on diverse culinary traditions in an informative collection of recipes that includes Instant Pot and slow-cooker options for lentils, chickpeas and more.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"A modern and fresh look at the diverse world of beans and pulses, including 125 recipes for globally inspired vegetarian mains, snacks, soups, and even desserts"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Unlock the possibilities of beans, chickpeas, lentils, pulses, and more with 125 fresh, modern recipes for globally inspired vegetarian mains, snacks, soups, and desserts, from a James Beard Award-winning food writer “This is the bean bible we need.”—Bon Appétit JAMES BEARD AWARD NOMINEE • ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR: Food Network, NPR, Forbes, Smithsonian Magazine, WiredAfter being overlooked for too long in the culinary world, beans are emerging for what they truly are: a delicious, versatile, and environmentally friendly protein. In fact, with a little ingenuity, this nutritious and hearty staple is guaranteed to liven up your kitchen.Joe Yonan, food editor of the Washington Post,provides a master base recipe for cooking any sort of bean in any sort of appliance—Instant Pot, slow cooker, or stovetop—as well as creative recipes for using beans in daily life, from Harissa-Roasted Carrot and White Bean Dip to Crunchy Spiced Chickpeas to Smoky Black Bean and Plantain Chili. Drawing on the culinary traditions of the Middle East, the Mediterranean, Africa, South America, Asia, and the American South, and with beautiful photography throughout, this book has recipes for everyone. With fresh flavors, vibrant spices, and clever techniques, Yonan shows how beans can make for thrillingdinners, lunches, breakfasts—and even desserts!