Moon of the crusted snow A novel

Waubgeshig Rice, 1979-

Book - 2018

"A daring post-apocalyptic novel from a powerful rising literary voice. With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow. The community leadearship loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate ...the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision. Blending action and allegory, Moon of the Crusted Snow upends our expectations. Out of catastrophe comes resilience. And as one society collapses, another is reborn."--Provided by publisher.

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Subjects
Genres
Dystopias
Suspense fiction
Dystopian fiction
Domestic fiction
Thrillers (Fiction)
Published
Toronto, ON : ECW Press [2018]
Language
English
Physical Description
218 pages : illustration ; 22 cm
ISBN
9781770414006
1770414002
Main Author
Waubgeshig Rice, 1979- (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Power outages are a normal occurrence on the reservation of an Anishinaabe community in northern Ontario, but an unusually extended lack of outside communications or food deliveries causes fear and panic among the residents. Evan Whitesky, a young husband and father, helps fortify the town for the looming winter by looking to the old ways of their tribe: hunting, communal support, and offerings to the spirits. Rice's sophomore effort (after Legacy, 2014) is an atmospheric drama that includes some standard apocalyptic tropes—like the loss of contact and the threat of outsiders—but it's the cohesion of community among this indigenous culture and the positive influences of family and tradition that shine in the story. Rice seamlessly injects Anishinaabe ?language into the dialogue and creates a beautiful rendering of the natural world. Although more deliberate than most end-of-the-world thrillers, the story builds in tension and violence as the days get colder and the supplies dwindle. This title will appeal to fans of literary science fiction akin to Cormac McCarthy as well as to readers looking for a fresh voice in indigenous fiction. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Review by PW Annex Reviews

Fall is just about to turn into winter when cell service goes out in a Anishinaabe community in Rice's chilling post-apocalyptic novel (following Legacy). The novel centers on Evan Whitesky, a young father to two children living on a reservation in northern Canada who is attempting to relearn and maintain the traditional ways in a world where society has collapsed and electricity, cell phones, land lines, and satellites have all disappeared. In the absence of all the things that make the long, harsh winters of northern Canada easier, the community has to band together to ensure its survival, doling out canned provisions and trying to ensure running water and heat for everyone for as long as possible. When a man arrives seeking refuge from the chaos in the south, Evan and his community allow him to stay in spite of their misgivings. As the winter progresses and hunger sets in, hostility rises and small-town power struggles become a life-or-death affair. This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless. (Oct.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.

Review by PW Annex Reviews

Fall is just about to turn into winter when cell service goes out in a Anishinaabe community in Rice's chilling post-apocalyptic novel (following Legacy). The novel centers on Evan Whitesky, a young father to two children living on a reservation in northern Canada who is attempting to relearn and maintain the traditional ways in a world where society has collapsed and electricity, cell phones, land lines, and satellites have all disappeared. In the absence of all the things that make the long, harsh winters of northern Canada easier, the community has to band together to ensure its survival, doling out canned provisions and trying to ensure running water and heat for everyone for as long as possible. When a man arrives seeking refuge from the chaos in the south, Evan and his community allow him to stay in spite of their misgivings. As the winter progresses and hunger sets in, hostility rises and small-town power struggles become a life-or-death affair. This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless. (Oct.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.

Review by PW Annex Reviews

Fall is just about to turn into winter when cell service goes out in a Anishinaabe community in Rice's chilling post-apocalyptic novel (following Legacy). The novel centers on Evan Whitesky, a young father to two children living on a reservation in northern Canada who is attempting to relearn and maintain the traditional ways in a world where society has collapsed and electricity, cell phones, land lines, and satellites have all disappeared. In the absence of all the things that make the long, harsh winters of northern Canada easier, the community has to band together to ensure its survival, doling out canned provisions and trying to ensure running water and heat for everyone for as long as possible. When a man arrives seeking refuge from the chaos in the south, Evan and his community allow him to stay in spite of their misgivings. As the winter progresses and hunger sets in, hostility rises and small-town power struggles become a life-or-death affair. This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless. (Oct.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

When a small Ojibwa community in the far north loses power at the beginning of the winter, residents do not realize it is because society in the south is failing, and when people arrive from the south, harsh conditions take their toll.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

National BestsellerWinner of the 2019 OLA Forest of Reading Evergreen AwardShortlisted for the 2019 John W. Campbell Memorial AwardShortlisted for the 2019/20 First Nation Communities READ Indigenous Literature Award2020 Burlington Library Selection; 2020 Hamilton Reads One Book One Community Selection; 2020 Region of Waterloo One Book One Community Selection; 2019 Ontario Library Association Ontario Together We Read Program Selection; 2019 Women’s National Book Association’s Great Group Reads; 2019 Amnesty International Book Club PickJanuary 2020 Reddit r/bookclub pick of the month“This slow-burning thriller is also a powerful story of survival and will leave readers breathless.” — Publishers Weekly“Rice seamlessly injects Anishinaabe language into the dialogue and creates a beautiful rendering of the natural world … This title will appeal to fans of literary science-fiction akin to Cormac McCarthy as well as to readers looking for a fresh voice in indigenous fiction.” — BooklistA daring post-apocalyptic novel from a powerful rising literary voiceWith winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community goes dark. Cut off, people become passive and confused. Panic builds as the food supply dwindles. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives, escaping the crumbling society to the south. Soon after, others follow.The community leadership loses its grip on power as the visitors manipulate the tired and hungry to take control of the reserve. Tensions rise and, as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and Anishinaabe tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again. Guided through the chaos by an unlikely leader named Evan Whitesky, they endeavor to restore order while grappling with a grave decision.Blending action and allegory, Moon of the Crusted Snow upends our expectations. Out of catastrophe comes resilience. And as one society collapses, another is reborn. Sales and Market BulletsA post-apocalyptic thriller set in Northeastern Ontario west of James BayAuthor is a high profile CBC journalist influential on Twitter with 24.8K followers (@waub)The book centers around a First Nation community of AnishinaabeHistorically, post-apocalyptic stories and themes haven’t been thoroughly explored from an Indigenous perspective in literary fictionExamines the ongoing impacts of settler colonialism on Indigenous communitiesA unique and compelling story about an Indigenous community by an Indigenous authorAudienceFor readers of Richard Wagamese’s Medicine WalkPromotional PlansPitch author to literary festivals across North America, esp. IFOA. Liaise with the author's contacts at CBC (he is a high profile and influential journalist there with name recognition). Send to trade review publications for increased US exposure (Quill & Quire, Library Journal, Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, Booklist, etc.)Pitch reviews at major dailies (New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, National Post)Pitch reviews at literary journals (The Malahat Review, Literary Review of Canada, Canadian Notes & Queries, The New Quarterly, Geist)

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A post-apocalyptic novel set in a remote northern First Nations community. As their tenuous links to the southern world wink out, Evan and his community learn to rely again on the old ways to survive. But a wendigo southerner arrives to threaten everything.