Winterlust Finding beauty in the fiercest season

Bernd Brunner, 1964-

Book - 2019

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Subjects
Published
Vancouver ; Berkeley [California] : Greystone Books 2019.
Language
English
German
Item Description
"Originally published in Germany by Verlag Galiani Berlin as Als die winter noch winter waren: geschichte einer jahreszeit"--Title page verso.
Physical Description
xiii, 262 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 20 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-252) and index.
ISBN
9781771643528
1771643528
Main Author
Bernd Brunner, 1964- (author)
Other Authors
Mary Catherine Lawler (translator), Mark Kurlansky (writer of foreword)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

In this thoughtful and meditative book on winter, essayist Brunner opts not to bemoan the season's faults, but to find reasons to sing its praises. In direct and accessible prose, he introduces the titular notion, an admirable variation on wanderlust, zeroing in on "the particular enchantments of this time of year." He celebrates the magic of snowfall, romantically evoking shared childhood experiences of snowball fights or lying on the ground making snow angels "as we gaze up into the sky." Brunner encourages readers to willingly embrace winter as an antidote to increasingly hurried and hectic lifestyles. Looking to Scandinavia, he touches on the popular—if somewhat amorphous—concept of hygge, a cultural ideal that has become the "new magic word" for many non-Scandinavians for its associations with "warmth and contentment," as often created through such elements as a crackling fire, fluffy pillows, and warm blankets—all ways of setting a mood to offset the ice and snow outside. Another notable chapter deals with how such winter sports as skiing, tobogganing, sledding, and curling provide people with reasons to remain—and to find enjoyment—outdoors. With this calm meditation, Brunner offers readers pining for summer something to look forward to instead. (Nov.) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

In Winterlust, a farmer painstakingly photographs five thousand snowflakes, each one dramatically different from the next. Indigenous peoples thrive on frozen terrain, where famous explorers perish. Icicles reach deep underwater, then explode. Rooms warmed by crackling fires fill with scents of cinnamon, cloves, and pine. Skis carve into powdery slopes, and iceboats traverse glacial lakes.--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"Mr. Brunner’s winning book is a reassuring, nostalgic reminder that winter is the season of both play and regeneration.”'Wall Street JournalIn Winterlust, a farmer painstakingly photographs five thousand snowflakes, each one dramatically different from the next. Indigenous peoples thrive on frozen terrain, where famous explorers perish. Icicles reach deep underwater, then explode. Rooms warmed by crackling fires fill with scents of cinnamon, cloves, and pine. Skis carve into powdery slopes, and iceboats traverse glacial lakes.This lovingly illustrated meditation on winter entwines the spectacular with the everyday, expertly capturing the essence of a beloved yet dangerous season, which is all the more precious in an era of climate changeBrunner masterfully does in words what resilient and adventurous people have done in their lives for centuries; he finds beauty in blizzards and ice and the crystallized enchantment of snow.' "Dan Egan, Pulitzer finalist and author of The Death and Life of the Great Lakes

Review by Publisher Summary 3

“Mr. Brunner’s winning book is a reassuring, nostalgic reminder that winter is the season of both play and regeneration.”—Wall Street JournalIn Winterlust, a farmer painstakingly photographs five thousand snowflakes, each one dramatically different from the next. Indigenous peoples thrive on frozen terrain, where famous explorers perish. Icicles reach deep underwater, then explode. Rooms warmed by crackling fires fill with scents of cinnamon, cloves, and pine. Skis carve into powdery slopes, and iceboats traverse glacial lakes.This lovingly illustrated meditation on winter entwines the spectacular with the everyday, expertly capturing the essence of a beloved yet dangerous season, which is all the more precious in an era of climate change“Brunner masterfully does in words what resilient and adventurous people have done in their lives for centuries; he finds beauty in blizzards and ice and the crystallized enchantment of snow.” —Dan Egan, Pulitzer finalist and author of The Death and Life of the Great Lakes