An orc on the wild side

Tom Holt, 1961-

Book - 2019

"Being the Dark Lord and Prince of Evil is not as much fun as it sounds, particularly if you are a basically decent person. King Mordak is just such a person. Technically he's more goblin than person, but the point is that he is really keen to be a lot less despicable than his predecessors. Not the other goblins appreciate Mordak's attempts to redefine the role. Why should they when his new healthcare program seems designed to actually extend life expectancy, and his efforts to en...d a perfectly reasonable war with the dwarves appear to have become an obsession? With confidence in his leadership crumbling, what Mordak desperately needs is a distraction. Perhaps some of these humans moving to the Realm in search of great homes at an affordable price will be able to help?"--Provided by publisher.

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Subjects
Genres
Humorous fiction
Fantasy fiction
Novels
Published
New York, NY : Orbit 2019.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
392 pages ; 21 cm
ISBN
9780316270854
0316270857
Main Author
Tom Holt, 1961- (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Terry and Molly Barrington are settling into their new home, Caras Snorgond, a tower formerly occupied by a great wizard, and figuring out their new life in the Hidden Realms. They have all the comforts they enjoyed in London, when they can get it delivered. King Mordak, Dark Lord and Prince of Evil, has been having trouble implementing his liberal social reforms under the banner of New Evil. As he faces bureaucracy and the limits of Goblinkind, he seeks a new addition. King Drain of the Dwarvenhold is also figuring out his new neighbors while his new human cook, Ms. White, is seeking new opportunities while escaping her past. Holt, author of Doughnut (2012), has created an entertaining intersection of magic, commerce, technology, prophecy, bureaucracy, and conflicting legal systems. He provides a humorous context for a discussion on the nature of evil and figuring out how to get along with others, despite the influence of disembodied evil. For more humorous fantasy, see the Core Collection on p. xx. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

Terry and Molly Barrington are settling into their new home, Caras Snorgond, a tower formerly occupied by a great wizard, and figuring out their new life in the Hidden Realms. They have all the comforts they enjoyed in London, when they can get it delivered. King Mordak, Dark Lord and Prince of Evil, has been having trouble implementing his liberal social reforms under the banner of New Evil. As he faces bureaucracy and the limits of Goblinkind, he seeks a new addition. King Drain of the Dwarvenhold is also figuring out his new neighbors while his new human cook, Ms. White, is seeking new opportunities while escaping her past. Holt, author of Doughnut (2012), has created an entertaining intersection of magic, commerce, technology, prophecy, bureaucracy, and conflicting legal systems. He provides a humorous context for a discussion on the nature of evil and figuring out how to get along with others, despite the influence of disembodied evil. For more humorous fantasy, see the Core Collection on p. xx. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

J.R.R. Tolkien gets what's coming to him in this hilarious fifth YouSpace novel (after The Good, the Bad, and the Smug), a witty parody of high fantasy. A few contemporary humans travel to an alternate reality known as the Hidden Realms and immediately attempt to gentrify it, though it is one of the oldest and most feared places in the multiverse. Their plans clash with the bureaucratic obsession of the elves, the strangely progressive New Evil governance style of the goblin king, and the avarice of the dwarves, and may also bring about an ancient prophecy spelling out the end of the world. The broad cast includes a wraith who'd rather be a supermodel, a Dark Lord fixated on benevolent reform, a con artist hoping to make her fortune, and some snooty married couples who imagine they're retiring in style to their very own magical towers. Holt's dry silliness is the perfect vehicle for critiquing both current events and classic fantasy novels. Clever and entertaining all the way through, this should find a place in the hearts of anyone who likes their fantasy with a side of irreverent humor. (Sept.) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Being the Dark Lord and Prince of Evil is not as much fun as it sounds, particularly if you are a basically decent person. King Mordak is just such a person. Technically he's more goblin than person, but the point is that he is really keen to be a lot less despicable than his predecessors. Not the other goblins appreciate Mordak's attempts to redefine the role. Why should they when his new healthcare program seems designed to actually extend life expectancy, and his efforts to end a perfectly reasonablewar with the dwarves appear to have become an obsession? With confidence in his leadership crumbling, what Mordak desperately needs is a distraction. Perhaps some of these humans moving to the Realm in search of great homes at an affordable price will beable to help?"--Provided by publisher.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

An Orc on the Wild Side is the latest comic masterpiece from one of the funniest writers in fantasy.Winter is coming, so why not get away from it all?Being the Dark Lord and Prince of Evil is not as much fun as it sounds, particularly if you are a basically decent person. King Mordak is just such a person. Technically he's more goblin than person, but the point is that he is really keen to be a lot less despicable than his predecessors. Not that the other goblins appreciate Mordak's attempts to redefine the role. Why should they when his new healthcare program seems designed to actually extend life expectancy, and his efforts to end a perfectly reasonable war with the dwarves appear to have become an obsession? With confidence in his leadership crumbling, what Mordak desperately needs is a distraction. Perhaps some of these humans moving to the Realm in search of great homes at an affordable price will be able to help? For more from Tom Holt, check out:The Management Style of the Supreme BeingsThe Good, The Bad, and the SmugThe Outsorcerer's ApprenticeWhen It's a JarDoughnutLife, Liberty, and the Pursuit of SausagesBlonde Bombshell