This land is their land The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the troubled history of Thanksgiving

David J. Silverman, 1971-

Book - 2019

Ahead of the 400th anniversary of the first Thanksgiving, a new look at the Plymouth colony's founding events, told for the first time with Wampanoag people at the heart of the story. In March 1621, when Plymouth's survival was hanging in the balance, the Wampanoag sachem (or chief), Ousamequin (Massasoit), and Plymouth's governor, John Carver, declared their people's friendship for each other and a commitment to mutual defense. Later that autumn, the English gathered their f...irst successful harvest and lifted the specter of starvation. Ousamequin and 90 of his men then visited Plymouth for the "First Thanksgiving." The treaty remained operative until King Philip's War in 1675, when 50 years of uneasy peace between the two parties would come to an end. 400 years after that famous meal, historian David J. Silverman sheds profound new light on the events that led to the creation, and bloody dissolution, of this alliance. Focusing on the Wampanoag Indians, Silverman deepens the narrative to consider tensions that developed well before 1620 and lasted long after the devastating war-tracing the Wampanoags' ongoing struggle for self-determination up to this very day. -- Publisher.

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Subjects
Published
New York : Bloomsbury Publishing 2019.
Language
English
Physical Description
x, 514 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 443-498) and index.
ISBN
9781632869241
Main Author
David J. Silverman, 1971- (author)
  • Mourning in America
  • The Wampanoags' old world
  • Danger on the horizon
  • Golgotha
  • Reaching out to strangers
  • Ousamequin's power play
  • A great man and a little child
  • Ungrateful
  • Ruining Thanksgiving
  • "Days of mourning and not joy"
  • Toward a day with less mourning.