No visible bruises What we don't know about domestic violence can kill us

Rachel Louise Snyder

Book - 2019

"[The author] explores America's epidemic of domestic violence and how it has been misunderstood, sharing insights into what domestic violence portends about other types of violence and what countermeasures are needed today."

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

362.8292/Snyder
2 / 2 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 362.8292/Snyder Checked In
2nd Floor 362.8292/Snyder Checked In
Subjects
Published
New York, NY : Bloomsbury Publishing Inc 2019.
Language
English
Physical Description
viii, 307 pages ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 285-297) and index.
ISBN
9781635570977
1635570972
Main Author
Rachel Louise Snyder (author)
  • Part I: The end. Little lunatics ; Barnacle siblings ; Whatever he's holding inside ; Daddy always lives ; A bear is coming at you ; This person you love will take your life ; And then they'll pray ; I can't live here anymore ; Systems, accidents, incidents ; And what happens next
  • Part II: The beginning. Penance ; Watching violence in a fishbowl ; The fatal peril club ; Clustered at the top ; The haunting presence of the inexplicable ; A superhero's kneecaps ; In the season of unmitigated discovery ; Those who break
  • Part III: The middle. In the cracks ; Shelter in place ; In the fire ; Grace under pressure ; Chambering a round ; Free free ; Shadow bodies.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Although domestic violence is a difficult subject, this sympathetic look at victims, perpetrators, and intervention efforts by law enforcement and social agencies makes for compelling reading. Journalist Snyder takes readers beyond headlines and mind-numbing statistics, sharing specific cases brought to life through her thorough research, perceptive observations, and in-depth interviews. Snyder profiles victims, surviving families and friends, perpetrators caught up in cycles of abuse, detectives, prosecutors, and others who see the evidence of domestic abuse all too often. This is not a series of individual commentaries but rather honest, ongoing conversations, with multiple instances of horror, fear, guilt, bravado, remorse, forgiveness, and frustration. Along the way, readers learn about experimental programs and policies designed to diminish the stigma associated with being abused, disrupt inbred violent behaviors spawned by generations of abuse, and provide protection and justice for victims, along with their varying levels of effectiveness. Snyder's chilling body of evidence shows that domestic abuse is a pervasive epidemic that can and does happen everywhere—and that there are no easy solutions in sight. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Choice Reviews

Also author of the well-received Fugitive Denim: A Moving Story of People and Pants in the Borderless World of Global Trade (2008), Snyder (literature, American Univ.) has written an invaluable study of domestic violence. Even those who are familiar with the topic will learn a great deal from this book. What makes Snyder's book unique is her approach: she begins with a domestic violence homicide-suicide and works her way backward, through engaging interviews with family members and friends on both sides, to uncover the red flags and missed opportunities for intervention. Rich with both up-to-date statistics and the words of the survivors themselves, including the parents of the victim, this is both a critical resource and a page turner. This book could save lives. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers.--A. J. Hattery, George Mason UniversityAngela J. HatteryGeorge Mason University Angela J. Hattery Choice Reviews 57:05 January 2020 Copyright 2019 American Library Association.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

If domestic violence really was that bad, wouldn't victims just walk out? Anyway, we've got an adequate shelter system, and such violence is unrelated to issues such as mass shootings and sexual assault. These are just some of the myths shredded by journalist Snyder, an associate professor at American University, who points out that domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime nationwide and is considered a global epidemic by the World Health Organization. Winner of the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

It pains to read this latest work from American University professor and novelist Snyder (Fugitive Denim). Descriptions of violence against victims can trigger unease and sadness, especially in those who have experienced relational trauma firsthand. And while graphic, this book is not gratuitous; rather, it illuminates the realities of domestic violence, working off the premise that instead of only targeting survivor recovery, our concern must be eradicating the behaviors of those who commit abuse. Alongside heartbreaking victim accounts, Synder uncommonly interviews abusers, finding a pattern of boxed-in masculinity (while abusers can be either sex, most are men), in which individuals are locked into expressing their emotions and experiencing their masculinity as dominance over another (or rarely, from failing to uphold masculine stereotypes). While new initiatives such as domestic violence forensic analysis, which provides an NTSB-like critique of domestic violence murders, help close loopholes that have cost lives, Synder reaches into optimism by profiling programs designed to help men healthily display emotions and shatter traditional gender roles of power. VERDICT A compelling treatise on how domestic violence correlates with larger societal problems detracting from the quality of life for all genders.—Jennifer M. Schlau, Elgin Community Coll., IL Copyright 2019 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

In this powerful investigation into intimate partner abuse, journalist and professor Snyder (Fugitive Denim) makes the case that "domestic violence, rather than being a private problem, is a most urgent matter of public health." She humanizes the price tag—victims in the U.S. collectively miss more than eight million days of work per year, and health-care costs borne by taxpayers exceed $8 billion annually—with closely observed, compassionate portraits of victims, advocates, abusers, and police. She also examines the interplay of culture, circumstance, and shame that keeps women with abusive partners, displaying a thorough understanding of systemic problems, including the lethal combination of common contributing factors, among them poverty, addiction, narcissism, and easy access to guns (in the U.S., 50 women a month are shot and killed by their partners). Balancing the gut-wrenching stories are hopeful explorations of resources that could prevent domestic homicides, including the Danger Assessment instrument used by medical professionals to assess an abuse partner's risk; programs that try to rehabilitate offenders; and comprehensive approaches to victim protection, such as that of DASH in Washington, D.C., which offers shelter to victims without disrupting their access to their homes, jobs, or communities. Penetrating and wise, and written in sometimes novelistic prose, Synder's sobering analysis will reward readers' attention. Agent: Susan Ramer, Don Congdon and Associates. (May) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

An award-winning journalist and expert guest explores America's epidemic of domestic violence and how it has been misunderstood, sharing insights into what domestic violence portends about other types of violence and what countermeasures are needed today.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Explores America's epidemic of domestic violence and how it has been misunderstood, sharing insights into what domestic violence portends about other types of violence and what countermeasures are needed today.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

An award-winning journalist’s intimate investigation of the true scope of domestic violence, revealing how the roots of America's most pressing social crises are buried in abuse that happens behind closed doors.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

WINNER OF THE HILLMAN PRIZE FOR BOOK JOURNALISM, THE HELEN BERNSTEIN BOOK AWARD, AND THE LUKAS WORK-IN-PROGRESS AWARD * A NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 BOOKS OF THE YEAR * NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST * LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST * ABA SILVER GAVEL AWARD FINALIST * KIRKUS PRIZE FINALIST

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF 2019 BY: Esquire, Amazon, Kirkus, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, BookPage, BookRiot, Economist, New York Times Staff Critics

“A seminal and breathtaking account of why home is the most dangerous place to be a woman . . . A tour de force.” —Eve Ensler

"Terrifying, courageous reportage from our internal war zone." —Andrew Solomon

"Extraordinary." —New York Times ,“Editors' Choice”

“Gut-wrenching, required reading.” —Esquire

"Compulsively readable . . . It will save lives." —Washington Post

“Essential, devastating reading.” —Cheryl Strayed, New York Times Book Review

An award-winning journalist’s intimate investigation of the true scope of domestic violence, revealing how the roots of America's most pressing social crises are buried in abuse that happens behind closed doors.

We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem.

In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don’t know we’re seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths—that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.