How not to fall apart Lessons learned on the road from self-harm to self-care

Maggy Van Eijk

Book - 2018

"What no one tells you about living with anxiety and depression--learned the hard way. Maggy van Eijk knows the best place to cry in public. She also knows that eating super salty licorice or swimming in icy cold water are things that make you feel alive but, unlike self-harm, aren't bad for you. These are the things to remember when you're sad. Turning 27, Maggy had the worst mental health experience of her life so far. She ended a three-year relationship. She lost friends and ma...de bad decisions. She drank too much and went to the ER over twelve times. She saw three different therapists and had three different diagnoses. She went to two burn units for self-inflicted wounds and was escorted in an ambulance to a mental health crisis center. But that's not the end of her story. Punctuated with illustrated lists reminiscent of Maggy's popular BuzzFeed posts, How Not to Fall Apart shares the author's hard-won lessons about what helps and what hurts on the road to self-awareness and better mental health. This is a book about what it's like to live with anxiety and depression, panic attacks, self-harm and self-loathing--and it's also a hopeful roadmap written by someone who's been there and is still finding her way"--

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Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 616.89/Van Eijk Due Jun 6, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York, New York : TarcherPerigee [2018]
Language
English
Physical Description
viii, 245 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
ISBN
9780143133490
0143133497
Main Author
Maggy Van Eijk (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Van Eijk, social-media manager for the BBC, has struggled with mental illness for most of her life. She knows firsthand about depression, anxiety, and panic attacks. She knows how it feels to be brought into the ER after losing touch with reality and being accused of using drugs. And she has developed some strategies for coping. Using "Remember this when . . ." as a refrain, van Eijk deals frankly with the issues that young people in particular face, including understanding body image distortions, falling in love, having sex, maintaining relationships, being hurt, going online, and being alone. Sparing nothing in telling her own story, the author offers not only an insider's view of mental illness but also lists survival tactics. Van Eijk admits to burning and cutting herself as well as using sex to find comfort, and she shares the ways she has found to move beyond self-destructive coping efforts. This is a gritty book and may be uncomfortable for some readers. But for those questioning their racing thoughts and inexplicable actions, it could well be a lifeline. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"What no one tells you about living with anxiety and depression--learned the hard way Maggy van Eijk knows the best place to cry in public. She also knows that eating super salty licorice or swimming in icy cold water are things that make you feel alive but, unlike self-harm, aren't bad for you. These are the things to remember when you're sad. Turning 27, Maggy had the worst mental health experience of her life so far. She ended a three-year relationship. She lost friends and made bad decisions. Shedrank too much and went to ER over twelve times. She saw three different therapists and had three different diagnoses. She went to two burn units for self-inflicted wounds and was escorted in an ambulance to a mental health crisis center. But that's not the end of her story. Punctuated with illustrated lists reminiscent of Maggy's popular BuzzFeed posts, How Not to Fall Apart shares the author's hard-won lessons about what helps and what hurts on the road to self-awareness and better mental health. Thisis a book about what it's like to live with anxiety and depression, panic attacks, self-harm and self-loathing--and it's also a hopeful roadmap written by someone who's been there and is still finding her way"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"She’s [Maggy is] really funny . . . If I had a self-destructive young adult in my life . . . this is probably the book I’d get her.” —The New York Times Book Review  “How Not to Fall Apart is the book that finally understands mental health, and it'll make you feel infinitely less alone.” —HelloGigglesFeatured in The New York Post, Lenny Letter, BuzzFeed, and more.What no one tells you about living with anxiety and depression—learned the hard way  Maggy van Eijk knows the best place to cry in public. She also knows that eating super salty licorice or swimming in icy cold water are things that make you feel alive but, unlike self-harm, aren't bad for you.These are the things to remember when you're sad. Turning 27, Maggy had the worst mental health experience of her life so far. She ended a three-year relationship. She lost friends and made bad decisions. She drank too much and went to ER over twelve times. She saw three different therapists and had three different diagnoses. She went to two burn units for self-inflicted wounds and was escorted in an ambulance to a mental health crisis center. But that's not the end of her story.Punctuated with illustrated lists reminiscent of Maggy's popular BuzzFeed posts, How Not to Fall Apart shares the author's hard-won lessons about what helps and what hurts on the road to self-awareness and better mental health. This is a book about what it's like to live with anxiety and depression, panic attacks, self-harm and self-loathing--and it's also a hopeful roadmap written by someone who's been there and is still finding her way.