(Don't) call me crazy 33 voices start the conversation about mental health

Book - 2018

"An anthology of essays and illustrations that illuminate mental health topics in a straightforward way"--

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

616.89/Don't
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 616.89/Don't Checked In
Review by Booklist Reviews

Jensen (Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World?, 2017) gathers together another varied, empowering collection of personal essays, poetry, artwork, and comics about the many ways people experience mental illness. Confessional and conversational, the contributions cover a wide array of conditions, treatments, and ways to manage symptoms, and while it can occasionally be a mixed bag, the best contributions are deeply resonant. Shaun David Hutchinson emphasizes that "Depression . . . may live in your skin, but it does not control you"; Emery Lord recounts visiting a Van Gogh exhibit during a depressive episode in a stirring, sharply funny essay; Hannah Bae describes how her troubled homelife contributed to her own disordered thinking; and Monique Bedard offers a moving prose poem about the pernicious, lasting effects of the systemic abuse of Native women. With this diverse array of contributors offering a stunning wealth of perspectives on mental health, teens looking for solidarity, comfort, or information will certainly be able to find something that speaks to them. Resources and further reading make this inviting, much-needed resource even richer. Grades 9-12. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 7 Up—Opening up about mental health is difficult but necessary, asserts the editor of this thought-provoking anthology. Libba Bray personifies her obsessive-compulsive disorder and anxiety, while Stephanie Kuehn describes life with misophonia. Adam Silvera dispels the myth that successful or cheerful individuals don't experience depression; Emery Lord seethes at the ignorant remarks about suicide she overhears at a Vincent van Gogh exhibit. Contributors also examine gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, as in Hannah Bae's exploration of her Korean family's reluctance to seek help for her mother's schizophrenia. The rare lackluster entry never detracts from the whole. As in Jensen's Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World, illustrations and a peppy design enhance this scrapbooklike volume. VERDICT Misconceptions about mental health still abound, making this honest yet hopeful title a vital selection for libraries.—Mahnaz Dar, School Library Journal Copyright 2018 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Essays, lists, poems and art explore the ways 33 best-selling authors and celebrity contributors have coped with and thrived in the face of mental illness, in an anthology that includes entries by Kristen Bell, Nancy Kerrigan and Libba Bray. Simultaneous eBook.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Presents an anthology of essays that illuminate such mental health topics as autism, bipolar disorder, body dysmorphia, depression, and healing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"An anthology of essays and illustrations that illuminate mental health topics in a straightforward way"--

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Essays, lists, poems, and art explore the ways in which 33 contributors cope—and thrive—with mental illness including actress Kristen Bell, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, and bestselling YA authors like Libba Bray, Adam Silvera, and Victoria Schwab.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

A Washington Post Best Children’s Book of 2018 Who’s Crazy?   What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when a label like that gets attached to your everyday experiences?   To understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there’s no single definition of crazy, there’s no single experience that embodies it, and the word itself means different things—wild? extreme? disturbed? passionate?—to different people.   In (Don’t) Call Me Crazy, thirty-three actors, athletes, writers, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore a wide range of topics: their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and don’t talk about mental health, help for better understanding how every person’s brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy.   If you’ve ever struggled with your mental health, or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages . . . and let’s get talking. This award-winning anthology is from the highly-praised editor of Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World and Body Talk: 37 Voices Explore Our Radical Anatomy. .  

Review by Publisher Summary 6

A Washington Post Best Children's Book of 2018 Who's Crazy?   What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when a label like that gets attached to your everyday experiences?   To understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there's no single definition of crazy, there's no single experience that embodies it, and the word itself means different things'wild? extreme? disturbed? passionate?'to different people.   In (Don't) Call Me Crazy, thirty-three actors, athletes, writers, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore a wide range of topics: their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and don't talk about mental health, help for better understanding how every person's brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy.   If you've ever struggled with your mental health, or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages . . . and let's get talking. This award-winning anthology is from the highly-praised editor of Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World and Body Talk: 37 Voices Explore Our Radical Anatomy. .  

Review by Publisher Summary 7

Essays, lists, poems, and art explore the ways in which 33 contributors cope'and thrive'with mental illness including actress Kristen Bell, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, and bestselling YA authors like Libba Bray, Adam Silvera, and Victoria Schwab.

Review by Publisher Summary 8

A Washington Post Best Children’s Book of 2018 Who’s Crazy?   What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when a label like that gets attached to your everyday experiences?   To understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there’s no single definition of crazy, there’s no single experience that embodies it, and the word itself means different things—wild? extreme? disturbed? passionate?—to different people.   In (Don’t) Call Me Crazy, thirty-three actors, athletes, writers, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore a wide range of topics: their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and don’t talk about mental health, help for better understanding how every person’s brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy.   If you’ve ever struggled with your mental health, or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages . . . and let’s get talking. This award-winning anthology is from the highly-praised editor of Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World and Body Talk: 37 Voices Explore Our Radical Anatomy. .  

Review by Publisher Summary 9

Essays, lists, poems, and art explore the ways in which 33 contributors cope—and thrive—with mental illness including actress Kristen Bell, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, and bestselling YA authors like Libba Bray, Adam Silvera, and Victoria Schwab.