Endangered and disappearing birds of the Midwest

Matt Williams

Book - 2018

In Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest, Matt Williams profiles forty of the most beautiful and interesting birds who winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and whose populations are most in danger of disappearing from the region. Each profile includes the current endangered status of the species, a description of the bird's vocal and nesting patterns, and tips to help readers identify them, along with stunning color images and detailed migration maps.--COVER.

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Subjects
Genres
Illustrated works
Published
Bloomington, Indiana : Indiana University Press [2018]
Language
English
Physical Description
214 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 27 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 207-211).
ISBN
9780253035271
0253035279
Main Author
Matt Williams (author)
  • Introduction
  • Northern bobwhite
  • Greater prairie-chicken
  • Yellow-billed cuckoo
  • Black-billed cuckoo
  • Whooping crane
  • Piping plover
  • Marbled godwit
  • Red knot
  • Dunlin
  • Pectoral sandpiper
  • Semipalmated sandpiper
  • American woodcock
  • Lesser yellowlegs
  • Willet
  • Herring gull
  • Snowy owl
  • Short-eared owl
  • Red-headed woodpecker
  • Loggerhead shrike
  • Horned lark
  • Bank swallow
  • Wood thrush
  • Evening grosbeak
  • Pine siskin
  • Snow bunting
  • Field sparrow
  • Grasshopper sparrow
  • Henslow's sparrow
  • Bobolink
  • Eastern meadowlark
  • Golden-winged warbler
  • Prothonotary warbler
  • Kentucky warbler
  • Kirtland's warbler
  • Cape May warbler
  • Cerulean warbler
  • Blackpoll warbler
  • Prairie warbler
  • Canada warbler
  • Wilson's warbler.
Review by Choice Reviews

In this colorful and easy-to-read book, Williams (director of conservation programs, Nature Conservancy) highlights 40 species of birds that winter, breed, or migrate in the Midwest and which are at risk due to small or quickly declining numbers. The species chosen are a representative sample of some of the most striking or unique vulnerable species. Each species account is about five pages in length and contains a handful of exquisite color photographs, along with a colored range map and a brief overview of habitat, ecology, identification, bird calls, nesting information, and reasons for the species' decline. A five-page works cited list is included at the back, but there are no references within the species descriptions. Much of the species information came from The Birds of North America and All about Birds, websites of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. Because the work is fairly small and doesn't offer enough pictures to be quite a coffee-table book, and its coverage is not comprehensive enough to serve as an official guide to the endangered or disappearing birds of the Midwest, it seems most appropriate for public collections or for those individuals who enjoy watching birds at their backyard feeders. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers.--K. P. McDonough, Northern Michigan UniversityKevin P McDonoughNorthern Michigan University Kevin P McDonough Choice Reviews 56:06 February 2019 Copyright 2019 American Library Association.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

- This book profiles forty birds that winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and are in danger of disappearing from the region. Unique angle will help it stand out from other guidebooks. - Birding is a very popular recreation, with birders contributing $36 billion to the US economy. - Along with the effect on the environment, the loss of birds could affect the ecotourism of the area. - Matt Williams is Director of Conservation Programs at the Nature Conservancy and author / photographer of several books. - Cover bird is a wood thrush

Review by Publisher Summary 2

From the birds who wake us in the morning with their cheerful chorus to those who flock to our feeders and brighten a gloomy winter day, birds fascinate us with their lively and interesting behavior and provide essential services from controlling pest populations to pollinating crops. And yet for all the benefits they provide, many species across Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio are in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat, agricultural expansion, changing forest conditions, and interactions with humans.In Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest, Matt Williams profiles forty of the most beautiful and interesting birds who winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and whose populations are most in danger of disappearing from the region. Each profile includes the current endangered status of the species, a description of the bird's vocal and nesting patterns, and tips to help readers identify them, along with stunning color images and detailed migration maps.An exquisite and timely examination of our feathered friends, Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest is a call to action to protect these vulnerable and gorgeous creatures that enliven our world.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

- This book profiles forty birds that winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and are in danger of disappearing from the region. Unique angle will help it stand out from other guidebooks.

- Birding is a very popular recreation, with birders contributing $36 billion to the US economy.

- Along with the effect on the environment, the loss of birds could affect the ecotourism of the area.

- Matt Williams is Director of Conservation Programs at the Nature Conservancy and author / photographer of several books.

- Cover bird is a wood thrush

Profiling forty of the Midwest's most beautiful birds, Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest is a call to action to protect these vulnerable and gorgeous creatures that enliven our world.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

From the birds who wake us in the morning with their cheerful chorus to those who flock to our feeders and brighten a gloomy winter day, birds fascinate us with their lively and interesting behavior and provide essential services from controlling pest populations to pollinating crops. And yet for all the benefits they provide, many species across Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio are in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat, agricultural expansion, changing forest conditions, and interactions with humans.


In Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest, Matt Williams profiles forty of the most beautiful and interesting birds who winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and whose populations are most in danger of disappearing from the region. Each profile includes the current endangered status of the species, a description of the bird's vocal and nesting patterns, and tips to help readers identify them, along with stunning color images and detailed migration maps.


An exquisite and timely examination of our feathered friends, Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest is a call to action to protect these vulnerable and gorgeous creatures that enliven our world.