Mummies at the museum

Wong Herbert Yee

Book - 2018

Things are looking up for best friends Hammy and Gerbee, a hamster and a gerbil, when they find out they're both in Miss Capybara's class. But it's not long before school becomes a battle between the good (Hammy and Gerbee), the bad (spelling bees and pop quizzes), and the evil (mice twins Anna and Hanna). Can things get any worse? Or mischievous? Yep!

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Series
Yee, Wong Herbert. Hammy and Gerbee.
Subjects
Genres
Graphic novels
Published
New York, NY : Henry Holt and Company 2018.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Item Description
"Christy Ottaviano books."
Physical Description
107 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
ISBN
9781627794626
162779462X
Main Author
Wong Herbert Yee (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Hammy and Gerby, hamster and gerbil best friends, head into their new school year harried by a pair of sister mice, Anna and Hanna. Meeting their new teacher, Miss Capybara, taking spelling tests, and going on a field trip to the museum to study ancient Egypt, Hammy and Gerby give as good as they get, trading tricks and jokes with the sisters. But then, disguised as mummies, the two stumble on a plot to steal a valuable sarcophagus and foil it with the help of Miss Capybara for a triumphant and amusing finish. Yee is known for his Frog and Toad–inspired early reader series Mouse and Mole, and he effectively carries over the theme of friendship, as well as the humor and wordplay. The bordering-on-irreverent fun will be right up the alley of his targeted age group, and the simple, friendly figures that fill out the inventively composed comic pages will draw them right in. An excellent balance between Yee's own early reader sensibilities and the zany high jinks of Jennifer and Matthew Holm's Babymouse. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

In this first book in the Hammy and Gerbee series, schoolmates Hammy the hamster and Gerbee the gerbil pursue a gleeful rivalry with Anna and Hanna, twin girl mice in their elementary school class. The girls know the right answers; the boys, not so much. In this comic's early chapters, the four pupils settle in with their new teacher, Miss Capybara. Yee's loose, scribbly line makes for adorable figures; Miss Cap's whipped-cream hairdo and cat's-eye glasses are particularly fetching. Victory and defeat are evenly distributed: Hammy and Gerbee fail to beat the twins at spelling ("B-A-N-A-N-N-A") but succeed in using reverse psychology to get Anna to choose to the science museum for their field trip ("I sure hope Anna picks the art museum!"). The fast-paced later chapters see the class arrive at a mummy exhibition to view the tomb of Ratakomen. The enticing similarity between toilet paper and mummy wrap gives the boys an idea, but instead of disgracing themselves, they foil a crime. This is relaxed, congenial entertainment: Hammy and Gerbee are after easy laughs, and fans of broad humor will be satisfied. Ages 6–9. (Jan.) Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 2–5—Like the best dynamic duos, Hammy and Gerbee share many things: both are rodents, both have Miss Capybara as their teacher, and neither can stand their twin classmates, Anna and Hanna. When Miss Capybara hosts a spelling test and Anna bests Hammy, Anna gets to decide the class's surprise field trip. In a masterstroke, Hammy and Gerbee trick her into choosing the science museum. The pair's penchant for tomfoolery pervades the panels—resulting in a lot of self-congratulatory fist bumps and more than a few hairy situations. Yee, known mostly for picture books and early readers, uses spare panels and plenty of white space to create an early graphic novel that's a great introduction to those new to the format. Sections are divided into nine short chapters. Characters speak about the author and literally leave the panels to escape danger, adding a meta-fictive flourish to the humor. From Rodentia to Ratakomen, rodent-related puns riddle the text. Back matter includes some facts about Egypt that add context to the story. The book is only two colors (blue and white), which may deter die-hard color comics devotees, but those who take a chance on this title will be pleased indeed. Fans of Jarrett J. Krosoczka's "Lunch Lady," Drew Brockington's "CatStronauts," and Ashley Spires's "Binky" will enjoy the animal antics and look forward to future installments in the series. VERDICT A funny stepping stone for newer comics readers and a welcome addition to all children's comics collections.—Alec Chunn, Eugene Public Library, OR Copyright 2017 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

When best friends Hammy and Gerbee join their class on a field trip to the science museum, they find their own fun--and trouble--along the way.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Things are looking up for best friends Hammy and Gerbee, a hamster and a gerbil, when they find out they're both in Miss Capybara's class. But it's not long before school becomes a battle between the good (Hammy and Gerbee), the bad (spelling bees and pop quizzes), and the evil (mice twins Anna and Hanna). Can things get any worse? Or mischievous? Yep!

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A charming young graphic novel-hybrid starring best friends Hammy and Gerbee. Bonus: science and history facts on Egypt!Things are looking up for best friends Hammy and Gerbee—a hamster and a gerbil—when they find out they’re both in Miss Capybara’s class. But it’s not long before school becomes a battle between the good (Hammy and Gerbee), the bad (spelling bees and pop quizzes), and the evil (mice twins Anna and Hanna). Can things get any worse? Or mischievous? Yep! They’re going on a field trip to the science museum. What are two rodent friends to do but find their own fun (and trouble)? This is a terrific stepping stone for kids who are excited about graphic novels but not yet ready to tackle longer formats. Christy Ottaviano Books