Gardens of the High Line Elevating the nature of modern landscapes

Piet Oudolf

Book - 2017

"Before it was restored, the High Line was an untouched, abandoned landscape overgrown with wildflowers. Today it is much more than that: it's a central plaza, a cultural center, a walkway, and a green retreat in a bustling city that is free for all to enjoy. But above all else, it is a beautiful, dynamic garden with plantings designed by Piet Oudolf ... [This book] offers an in-depth view into the planting designs, plant palette, and maintenance of this landmark achievement"--Ama...zon.com.

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

712.5/Oudolf
0 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 712.5/Oudolf Due Oct 17, 2022
Subjects
Published
Portland, Oregon : Timber Press [2017]
Language
English
Physical Description
319 pages : chiefly color illustrations, color map ; 31 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 316-317) and index.
ISBN
9781604696998
1604696990
Main Author
Piet Oudolf (author)
Other Authors
Rick Darke (author), Robert Hammond, 1969- (writer of introduction)
  • Introduction / by Robert Hammond
  • Elevating the nature of modern landscapes
  • Gardens of the High Line. Gansevoort woodland ; Washington grasslands ; Hudson River overlook ; Sundeck & water garden ; Northern spur ; 10th Avenue square ; Chelsea grasslands ; Chelsea thicket ; 23rd Street lawn & seating steps ; Meadow walk ; Flyover ; Wildflower fields & radial plantings ; Rail yards.
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* First, the content of this wondrous book should not be confused with that of On the High Line (2014), which also employs photos by coauthor Darke but is a walking guide more concerned with points of interest seen from the mile and a half of abandoned elevated train track running from Lower Manhattan to the rail yards near Twelfth Avenue and West Thirty-Fourth Street than with the extraordinary, diverse plantings—from trees to grasses—that animate it. Oudolf, one of the lead designers of the project, which was completed in 2014, expounds on the overarching beauty of the project's contradictions: the garden sits on "a monumental example of America's heavy industry" while presenting the "lightness of being" of the plant world, a study in precision of design and management of a series of gardens whose plants and patterns are constantly in flux, in both form and color. Darke's captivating images, hemmed in by the previously mentioned book's smaller format, are given lavish display here, often filling double-page spreads and leading the reader northward up the trail, stopping to showcase a flower, or a piece of sculpture, the curve of a rusted section of track adorned with blooms, or a view of the world beyond. A wholly enchanting celebration of the transformation of one sliver of urban industrial landscape. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Choice Reviews

The High Line, once an abandoned area filled with wildflowers, has been transformed into an art museum, a community area, a walkway, and a botanical garden. It stretches for more than a mile on an elevated railway structure through sections of Manhattan and attracts over seven million visitors a year. Unique? No; William Robinson's The Wild Garden (1870) highlighted this type of model garden. However, the High Line is an especially noteworthy amalgamation of an authentic industrial ruin transformed by the skills and knowledge of inspired landscape designers. The copious photographs are the book's glory; they illuminate the major part of the work that describes the 13 sectional gardens covering the entire distance of the original tracks. Manhattan's urban vistas provide a wonderful background for the nearly constantly changing, carefully selected vegetation. The original wild flora of the High Line consisted of 161 species. The design team expanded the plant diversity to about 400 species, including many grasses, perennials, and even trees. How such diversity is exploited for color, form, and seasonal variation in such a restricted environment gives this book instructional value for any garden designer. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers.--L. G. Kavaljian, California State University, SacramentoLeroy G. KavaljianCalifornia State University, Sacramento Leroy G. Kavaljian Choice Reviews 55:04 December 2017 Copyright 2017 American Library Association.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

The High Line is a tribute to nature, industry, and New York City. Running from Gansevoort Street to West 34th Street, between 10th and 12th Avenues, the park was inspired by the persistence of plants, the solidity and beauty of 19th-century railroad architecture, and city dwellers' longing for wild places amid the humanmade. High Line designer Oudolf and landscape consultant and author/photographer Darke offer a narrative of the park's creation and ongoing stewardship by volunteers. Its funding by the Friends of the High Line serves as a reminder of the intense commitment required for community-supported public parks anywhere. The High Line retains the wildness of "pioneer" or first plants but never at the risk of any one plant taking over completely. Each garden offers an experience unique to its location within the city and along the Line. A walk through its 1.45-mile entirety encourages personal interaction and reflection. Darke's photos, taken from the park's start to its end and at all times of day in all seasons, tell the story best. VERDICT Oudolf's aesthetics and mastery of plants will engage gardeners, landscape designers, and city dwellers everywhere and inspire a new regard for the regeneration of abandoned spaces.—Jeanette McVeigh, Univ. of the Sciences, Philadelphia Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

An innovative garden designer and a leading proponent of naturalistic planting offers an in-depth view into the planting designs, plant palette and maintenance of New York City’s iconic High Line, in a visual guide that has nearly 400 full-color photos. Original.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

This color-illustrated coffee table book uncovers the beauty of the High Line, a trail of gardens and natural areas on the route of an abandoned railroad line above the streets on Manhattan. The book highlights the various gardens, plants, and seasons of the High Line, as revealed in the plantings of garden designer Piet Oudolf. The book gives insight on Oudolf’s designs, plant palette, and naturalistic style. It also offers inspiration for home gardeners and garden designers. The book contains color photos on every page. Annotation ©2017 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Review by Publisher Summary 3

“If you can't get to the High Line. . . this is the next best thing.” —The Washington Post   Before it was restored, the High Line was an untouched, abandoned landscape overgrown with wildflowers. Today it’s a central plaza, a cultural center, a walkway, and a green retreat in a bustling city that is free for all to enjoy. This beautiful, dynamic garden was designed by Piet Oudolf, one of the world’s most extraordinary garden designers. Gardens of the High Line, by Piet Oudolf and Rick Darke, offers an in-depth view into the planting designs, plant palette, and maintenance of this landmark achievement. It reveals a four-season garden that is filled with native and exotic plants, drought-tol­erant perennials, and grasses that thrive and spread. It also offers inspiration and advice on recreating its iconic, naturalistic style. Featuring stunning photographs by Rick Darke and an introduction by Robert Hammond, the founder of the Friends of the High Line, this large-trim, photo-driven book is a must-have gem of nature of design.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

The Gardens of the High Line is the first book devoted to the plants and planting design of New York City's iconic High Line. In its sumptuous pages, Piet Oudolf, who designed the original plantings, and Rick Darke, a leading voice in sustainable horticulture, reveal why the High Line is such an iconic example of landscape design.   

Review by Publisher Summary 5

'If you can't get to the High Line. . . this is the next best thing.' 'The Washington Post   Before it was restored, the High Line was an untouched, abandoned landscape overgrown with wildflowers. Today it's a central plaza, a cultural center, a walkway, and a green retreat in a bustling city that is free for all to enjoy. This beautiful, dynamic garden was designed by Piet Oudolf, one of the world's most extraordinary garden designers. Gardens of the High Line, by Piet Oudolf and Rick Darke, offers an in-depth view into the planting designs, plant palette, and maintenance of this landmark achievement. It reveals a four-season garden that is filled with native and exotic plants, drought-tol­erant perennials, and grasses that thrive and spread. It also offers inspiration and advice on recreating its iconic, naturalistic style. Featuring stunning photographs by Rick Darke and an introduction by Robert Hammond, the founder of the Friends of the High Line, this large-trim, photo-driven book is a must-have gem of nature of design.