The spectrum of hope An optimistic and new approach to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

Gayatri Devi

Book - 2017

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Subjects
Published
New York : Workman Publishing [2017]
Language
English
Item Description
Includes index.
Physical Description
xiv, 324 pages ; 24 cm
ISBN
9780761193098
076119309X
Main Author
Gayatri Devi (author)
Review by Library Journal Reviews

With most baby boomers already in their 70s—and their surviving parents in their 90s—there is a rise in age-related Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Most people have a family member or friend who has a form of dementia, and many aging adults are concerned about their own cognitive health. Lenox Hill Hospital neurologist Devi (director, New York Memory and Healthy Aging Svcs.) views the disease as a spectrum disorder that presents and progresses differently in people. Early diagnosis is key: taking into account memory loss, language and life skills, and rate of progression, all of which may vary widely. People in early or preclinical stages can benefit from diet and lifestyle modifications and physical and cognitive exercises; those further along may experience improvement from medications as well as magnetic brain stimulation (not yet FDA-approved for AD). The author includes stories of her patients, most of whom live at home, though some continue to work, drive, and conduct other activities, with adequate and appropriate support. VERDICT Readers will feel the hope and compassion that guides Devi's work and learn to see AD and other dementias as more than a fearful disaster.—Marcia G. Welsh, Dartmouth Coll. Lib., Hanover, NH Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The neurologist and Director of the New York Memory and Healthy Aging Services redefines Alzheimer’s as a spectrum disorder and offers hope and advice to both those diagnosed and their family members for maintaining dignity, independence and continuing to live fulfilling lives.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the 5 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who’s been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than 20 years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites the story of Alzheimer’s by defining it as a spectrum disorder—like autism, Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects different people differently. She encourages people who are worried about memory impairment to seek a diagnosis, because early treatment will enable doctors and caregivers to manage the disease more effectively through drugs and other therapies. Told through the stories of Dr. Devi’s patients, The Spectrum of Hope humanizes the science, and offers equal parts practical advice and wisdom with skillful ease, along with real hope. Here are chapters on how to maintain independence and dignity; how to fight depression, anxiety, and apathy; how to communicate effectively with a person suffering from dementia. Plus chapters on sexuality, genetics, going public with the diagnosis, even putting together a bucket list—because through her practice, Dr. Devi knows that the majority of Alzheimer’s patients continue to live and work in their communities. They babysit their grandkids, drive to the store (or own the store), serve their clients, or otherwise live fulfilling lives. That’s news that 5 million people are waiting to hear.  

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer's. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the 5 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who's been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than 20 years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites the story of Alzheimer's by defining it as a spectrum disorder'like autism, Alzheimer's is a disease that affects different people differently. She encourages people who are worried about memory impairment to seek a diagnosis, because early treatment will enable doctors and caregivers to manage the disease more effectively through drugs and other therapies. Told through the stories of Dr. Devi's patients, The Spectrum of Hope humanizes the science, and offers equal parts practical advice and wisdom with skillful ease, along with real hope. Here are chapters on how to maintain independence and dignity; how to fight depression, anxiety, and apathy; how to communicate effectively with a person suffering from dementia. Plus chapters on sexuality, genetics, going public with the diagnosis, even putting together a bucket list'because through her practice, Dr. Devi knows that the majority of Alzheimer's patients continue to live and work in their communities. They babysit their grandkids, drive to the store (or own the store), serve their clients, or otherwise live fulfilling lives. That's news that 5 million people are waiting to hear.