No is not enough Resisting Trump's shock politics and winning the world we need

Naomi Klein, 1970-

Sound recording - 2017

Journalist Naomi Klein explains that Trump is not an aberration but a logical extension of the worst and most dangerous trends of the past half-century.

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

COMPACT DISC/303.61/Klein
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor COMPACT DISC/303.61/Klein Checked In
Subjects
Published
[Ashland, Oregon] : Blackstone Audio [2017]
Edition
Unabridged
Language
English
Physical Description
7 audio discs (8 hr.) : CD audio, digital ; 4 3/4 in
ISBN
9781538438701
1538438704
Main Author
Naomi Klein, 1970- (author)
Other Authors
Brit Marling, 1983- (narrator)
  • Part I. How we got here: rise of the superbrands
  • How Trump won by becoming the ultimate brand
  • The first family of brands
  • The Mar-a-Lago hunger games
  • Part II. Where we are now: climate of inequality
  • The climate clock strikes midnight
  • The grabber-in-chief
  • Politics hates a vacuum
  • Learn to love economic populism
  • Part III. How it could get worse: the shocks to come
  • Masters of disaster: doing an end run around democracy
  • The toxic to-do list: what to expect when you are expecting a crisis
  • Part IV. How things could get better
  • When the shock doctrine backfires
  • When no was not enough
  • Lessons from Standing Rock: daring to dream
  • A time to leap: because small steps won't cut it
  • Conclusion. The caring majority within reach
  • Postscript: The leap manifesto.
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Klein deconstructs the ways in which Donald Trump's presidency represents a culmination of free-market policy, wealth concentration, and media manipulation to create a Frankenstein's monster that has the ability to do harm that will impact the world for generations. She identifies strategies both local and global that people can use to minimize the damage. Marling reads in a soft, smooth voice that draws listeners in most effectively during the more personal parts of the narrative, such as when Klein talks about how she has experienced Trump's rise and early presidency or when discussing her child's future. But Marling falters capturing Klein's command and intensity when delving into the details of Trump's crass antics, economic interests, questionable dealings, and encouragement of white supremacists. Klein's prose hints at anger, disdain, and reproach, but Marling's tone sounds lackadaisical and even passive, which is antithetical to the book's overall message. A Haymarket paperback. (June) Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly.