From global to local The making of things and the end of globalization

Finbarr Livesey

Book - 2017

"This brilliantly original book dismantles the underlying assumptions that drive the decisions made by companies and governments throughout the world, to show that our shared narrative of the global economy is deeply flawed. If left unexamined, they will lead corporations and countries astray, with dire consequences for us all. For the past fifty years or so, the global economy has been run on three big assumptions: that globalization will continue to spread, that trade is the engine of gro...wth and development, and that economic power is moving from the West to the East. More recently, it has also been taken as a given that our interconnectedness--both physical and digital--will increase without limit. But what if all these ideas are wrong? What if everything is about to change? Indeed, what if it has already started to change but we just haven't noticed? Increased automation, the advent of additive manufacturing (3D printing, for example), changes in shipping and environmental pressures, among other factors, are coming together to create a fast-changing global economic landscape in which the rules are being rewritten--at once a challenge and an opportunity for companies and countries alike."--Jacket.

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

337/Livesey
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 337/Livesey Checked In
Subjects
Published
New York : Pantheon Books [2017]
Edition
First American edition
Language
English
Physical Description
ix, 210 pages ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781101871218
1101871210
Main Author
Finbarr Livesey (author)
  • Go east, young man?
  • From putting out to getting out
  • "Tea, Earl Grey, hot," or How we will make
  • All hail our robot overlords
  • Getting from A to NA in a hilly world
  • Manufacturing the environment
  • Looking through the other end of the telescope
  • Mapping the fracture between the physical and the digital
  • The changing politics of manufacturing
  • Epilogue: The post world.
Review by Library Journal Reviews

We're so convinced that globalization is the name of the game in business, government, and culture that we haven't noticed that the world is shifting away from that model. So argues Livesey, a senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at Cambridge, who cites increased automation, additive manufacturing, and environmental pressures among the many reasons we're going local. Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

Review by PW Annex Reviews

Livesey, a Cambridge lecturer on politics and international studies, puts forth the thought-provoking and disruptive premise that globalization is not the way of the future. He posits accepted wisdom on globalization's victory as misleading and argues that, instead of being in the midst of an ever-expanding world economy, societies are operating on an economic model that became obsolete over the past few decades. As evidence that globalization is already on the decline, he cites the United States's increased tariffs on foreign goods and current pledges to end trade deals, and the United Kingdom's departure from the European Union. In addition, he cogently points out one downside of globalization's ascendancy: what he calls the "hollowing out of the industrial common," in which skills and infrastructure leave a country along with outsourced manufacturing jobs. To bring to light a positive alternative to this trend, Livesey discusses how localization in manufacturing is already taking place, with a print-on-demand machine at the Harvard Bookstore and a process currently under development at Wake Forest University for creating artificial human organs rather than relying on donations. Livesey's insightful and reflective work makes a convincing argument that the economic landscape of the future is already being significantly reshaped. (Sept.) Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly Annex.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"This brilliantly original book dismantles the underlying assumptions that drive the decisions made by companies and governments the world over to show that our shared narrative of the global economy is deeply flawed and, if left unexamined, will lead corporations and countries astray, with dire consequences for us all. For the past fifty years or so, the global economy has been run on three big assumptions: that globalization will continue to spread; that trade is the engine of growth and development; and that economic power is moving from the West to the East. More recently, it has also been taken as a given that our interconnectedness--both physical and digital--will increase without limit. But what if all these assumptions are wrong? What if everything is about to change? Indeed, what if it has already started to change but we just haven't noticed? Increased automation, the advent of additive manufacturing (3D printing, for example), changes in shipping and environmental pressures, among other factors, are coming together to create a fast-changing global economic landscape in which the rules are being rewritten--at once a challenge and an opportunity for companies and countries"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"This brilliantly original book dismantles the underlying assumptions that drive the decisions made by companies and governments the world over to show that our shared narrative of the global economy is deeply flawed and, if left unexamined, will lead corporations and countries astray, with dire consequences for us all. For the past fifty years or so, the global economy has been run on three big assumptions: that globalization will continue to spread; that trade is the engine of growth and development; and that economic power is moving from the West to the East. More recently, it has also been taken as a given that our interconnectedness--both physical and digital--will increase without limit. But what if all these assumptions are wrong? What if everything is about to change? Indeed, what if it has already started to change but we just haven't noticed? Increased automation, the advent of additive manufacturing (3D printing, for example), changes in shipping, and environmental pressures, among other factors, are coming together to create a fast-changing global economic landscape in which the rules are being rewritten--at once a challenge and an opportunity for companies and countries"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Challenges the underlying assumptions that drive financial decisions throughout the world and explores how businesses and governments can make the most out of opportunities in today's fast-changing global economic landscape.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Challenges the underlying assumptions that drive financial decisions throughout the world to demonstrate how our shared narrative of the global economy is deeply flawed and will have dire consequences, exploring how businesses and governments can make the most out of opportunities in today's fast-changing global economic landscape.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

This brilliantly original book dismantles the underlying assumptions that drive the decisions made by companies and governments throughout the world, to show that our shared narrative of the global economy is deeply flawed. If left unexamined, they will lead corporations and countries astray, with dire consequences for us all. For the past fifty years or so, the global economy has been run on three big assumptions:  that globalization will continue to spread, that trade is the engine of growth and development, and that economic power is moving from the West to the East. More recently, it has also been taken as a given that our interconnectedness—both physical and digital—will increase without limit.  But what if all these ideas are wrong? What if everything is about to change? What if it has already begun to change but we just haven't noticed?Increased automation, the advent of additive manufacturing (3D printing, for example), and changes in shipping and environmental pressures, among other factors, are coming together to create a fast-changing global economic landscape in which the rules are being rewritten—at once a challenge and an opportunity for companies and countries alike.