Shtum A novel

Jem Lester

Book - 2017

"In this darkly funny and emotive debut, Ben Jewell has hit a breaking point. His profoundly autistic ten-year-old son, Jonah, has never spoken, and Ben and his wife Emma are struggling to cope. When Ben and Emma fake a separation--a strategic, yet ill-advised, decision to further Jonah's case in an upcoming tribunal to determine the future of his education--father and son are forced to move in with Georg, Ben's elderly and cantankerous father. In a small house in north London, th...ree generations of men--one who can't talk; two who won't--are thrown together. As Ben confronts single fatherhood, he must battle a string of well-meaning social workers and his own demons to advocate for his son, learning some harsh lessons about accountability from his own father along the way. As the tribunal draws near, Jonah, blissful in his innocence, becomes the prism through which all the complicated strands of personal identity, family history, and misunderstanding are finally untangled."--Amazon.com.

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Subjects
Genres
Black humor (Literature)
Domestic fiction
Published
New York, NY : The Overlook Press 2017.
Language
English
Physical Description
313 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
ISBN
9781468314724
1468314726
Main Author
Jem Lester (author)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Lester's debut, based on his experience of raising a child with autism, is an emotional and uplifting tale of love and sacrifice. Ben and Emma Jewell want the best for their son, Jonah, and they believe that includes placing him in a special residential school for kids with autism. However, obtaining approval for that placement will not be easy. Emma thinks Jonah will have the best chance of getting into the school if they fake a separation, so she convinces Ben to move in with his father, Georg—a transition that proves more challenging than anyone imagined. With Emma largely out of the picture, Ben is faced with being a single father to a 10-year-old son who is profoundly autistic, largely uncommunicative, and physically aggressive, while living with a father from whom he is largely estranged. With all these difficulties, Ben must also convince the admissions tribunal that the residential school is the most appropriate placement for Jonah. Complex characters and wonderful descriptions combine to create an honest yet blunt portrayal of the trials and triumphs associated with raising a child with autism. Agent: Laura Williams, Peters, Fraser, and Dunlop. (May) Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

After strategically faking a separation with his wife to influence a tribunal’s decision about the future of his severely autistic son’s education, Ben Jewell moves in with his elderly and cantankerous father and learns harsh lessons about accountability.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Ben Jewell, a single father, and Jonah, his profoundly autistic son, are forced to move into his father's house, as Ben deals with the complications of getting Jonah placed into a special school and all three generations struggle to communicate with eachother.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Funny and heartbreaking in equal measure, the impassioned debut novelabout fathers, sons, and autism

Review by Publisher Summary 4

In the “literary territory of Tony Parsons and Nick Hornby” (Guardian) Shtum is drawn from Jem Lester’s experience of raising an autistic child. In this darkly funny and emotive debut, Ben Jewell has hit a breaking point. His profoundly autistic ten-year-old son, Jonah, has never spoken, and Ben and his wife Emma are struggling to cope. When Ben and Emma fake a separation—a strategic, yet ill-advised, decision to further Jonah’s case in an upcoming tribunal to determine the future of his education—father and son are forced to move in with Georg, Ben’s elderly and cantankerous father. In a small house in north London, three generations of men— one who can’t talk; two who won’t—are thrown together.As Ben confronts single fatherhood, he must battle a string of well-meaning social workers and his own demons to advocate for his son, learning some harsh lessons about accountability from his own father along the way. As the tribunal draws near, Jonah, blissful in his innocence, becomes the prism through which all the complicated strands of personal identity, family history, and misunderstanding are finally untangled. This “fiercely funny” (The Times) debut examines the complexities of family and human emotion and gives profound insight into an often-misunderstood disorder.