If your monster won't go to bed

Denise Vega

Book - 2017

A handbook for youngsters that includes such instructions as "pour your monster a nice big glass of healthy, crunchy, oozy bug juice slimed with ooey-gooey snail trails to calm him."

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Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Alfred A. Knopf [2017]
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
ISBN
9780553496550
0553496557
Main Author
Denise Vega (author)
Other Authors
Zachariah OHora (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

An unseen narrator offers a child from a mixed-race family suggestions for getting her monster to sleep. Recommendations include: do not ask parents for help (they know nothing); do not involve the dog (she'll only whine); do not attempt the Monster Stomp (he will dance all night); do not count sheep (he'll just see them as a midnight snack); and never offer milk. Instead blenderize a big glass of oozy bug juice, give him an icy bath, brush and floss his fangs, find him a squishy toy, read him a scary story, and screech a lullaby. OHora's brightly colored acrylic artwork complements and extends Vega's tongue-in-cheek text. The multistriped monster sports happy colors (orange, fuchsia, pink, green, and azure), shaggy fur, and mushroomesque ears, and while he sometimes grimaces, he's clearly no danger to anyone. Young listeners are sure to appreciate the absurdities of Vega's instructions, particularly as they deviate from the tried-and-true tricks used by parents. A good choice for reading aloud any time of day. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Vega's spoof of parenting manuals stars a girl in pink pajamas and her monster, a yeti-style hulk with sherbet-striped fur. When it comes to monster bedtimes, "Don't ask your parents to help you," the narrator cautions. "They know a lot about putting kids to bed, but nothing about putting monsters to bed." OHora's (The Not So Quiet Library) thick, haphazard black lines are almost intrinsically funny. The girl's father is so intimidated by the challenges of putting a monster to bed that he jumps right into his wife's arms. (They're a biracial couple, and the pajama-clad girl has brown skin.) The girl's successful formula follows: "Step 1: Pour your monster a nice big glass of calming, crunchy, oozy bug juice," followed by an ice-cold bath and a terrifying story. Vega (Grandmother, Have the Angels Come?) makes fine use of tried-and-true comic elements: the child who dominates an enormous beast, gross-out language (burps, smelly underwear), and the way her monster loves everything human children hate. Readers will be too busy giggling to go to sleep. Ages 3–7. Author's agent: Lara Perkins, Andrea Brown Literary. Illustrator's agent: Sean McCarthy, Sean McCarthy Literary. (Mar.) Copyright 2016 Publisher Weekly.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 2—A brown-skinned girl in fuzzy bunny slippers faces the unenviable nightly task of putting her overtired monster to bed. An omnipresent narrator engages the unnamed main character and readers by discussing the importance of monsters getting their rest. Grumpy monsters are no fun, and with a series of "don'ts" that are reminiscent of what a chiding adult might say to a rambunctious child, the narrative proceeds to present what not to do, as readers follow the main character and her shaggy monster on their typical nighttime routine. Vega's incorporation of alliteration and wordplay, when woven with Ohora's bold acrylic art, creates a humorous discourse ideal for storytelling. Diversity abounds as the main character's parents, a white father quivering in the arms of her black mother, are shown to be incapable of putting monsters to bed. Vega reassures readers that "it's not their fault; they're just not good at it" and proceeds to list other concerns, such as sheep counting and avoiding the "Monster Stomp," which includes "waggle-wiggling, fur-flicking, [and] claw-clenching." The narrator provides six steps in the second half of the book, charmingly scrawled in a childlike print. Each step is fully illustrated on a spread. Strikingly bold artwork depicts a large, multicolored, bristly monster whose furry horns bear a passing resemblance to the young main character's hair puffs, slyly suggesting that bedtime routines are tough for monsters and children alike. VERDICT A superb example of picture book collaboration, this appealing title will be popular in most collections.—Rachel Zuffa, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2017 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A tongue-in-cheek, step-by-step manual for putting one's monster to bed explains the importance of monster-appropriate snacks, songs and stories. By the author of Build a Burrito and the illustrator of Stop Snoring, Bernard! Simultaneous eBook.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

For fans of How to Babysit a Grandpa comes a tongue-in-cheek story that is a step-by-step manual for putting your monster to bed.  If you have a monster that won't go to bed, don't bother asking your parents to help. They know a lot about putting kids to bed, but nothing about putting monsters to bed. It's not their fault; they're just not good at it. Read this book instead.   It will tell you what to feed your monster before bed (it's not warm milk), and what to sing to your monster (it's not a soothing lullaby), and what to read to your monster to send him off to dreamland in no time (the scarier, the better).   Just make sure you don't get too good at putting monsters to bed'or you might have a BIG problem on your hands!Praise for Zachariah OHora:   'the text is pitch-perfect, and the art is its match.' 'Chicago Tribune (Wolfie the Bunny)   'Picture books with hip, quirky illustrations that are not just funny but also have plenty of heart are hard to find. The stylish My Cousin Momo by Zachariah OHora has it all.' 'The Boston Globe (My Cousin Momo)   [set star] 'OHora's acrylic paintings are the heart of this tale. They clearly show everyone's feelings . . . and there are brilliant bits of humor and whimsy.' 'School Library Journal, starred review (Wolfie the Bunny)   'OHora could paint stones in the street and make them funny.' 'Publishers Weekly (My Cousin Momo)

Review by Publisher Summary 3

For fans of How to Babysit a Grandpa comes a tongue-in-cheek story that is a step-by-step manual for putting your monster to bed.  If you have a monster that won’t go to bed, don’t bother asking your parents to help. They know a lot about putting kids to bed, but nothing about putting monsters to bed. It’s not their fault; they’re just not good at it. Read this book instead.   It will tell you what to feed your monster before bed (it’s not warm milk), and what to sing to your monster (it’s not a soothing lullaby), and what to read to your monster to send him off to dreamland in no time (the scarier, the better).   Just make sure you don’t get too good at putting monsters to bed—or you might have a BIG problem on your hands!Praise for Zachariah OHora:   “The text is pitch-perfect, and the art is its match.” —Chicago Tribune (Wolfie the Bunny)   “Picture books with hip, quirky illustrations that are not just funny but also have plenty of heart are hard to find. The stylish My Cousin Momo by Zachariah OHora has it all.” —The Boston Globe (My Cousin Momo)   [set star] “OHora’s acrylic paintings are the heart of this tale. They clearly show everyone’s feelings . . . and there are brilliant bits of humor and whimsy.” —School Library Journal, starred review (Wolfie the Bunny)   “OHora could paint stones in the street and make them funny.” —Publishers Weekly (My Cousin Momo)