Oklahoma City

Barak Goodman

DVD - 2017

It traces the events that led McVeigh to that day and recounts the stories of the survivors, first-responders, US Marshals, FBI investigators, and journalists who covered the events. The film provides an in-depth and provocative exploration of the white supremacist, extremist militia movement that rose to prominence in the early 1990s and still makes news today.

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Subjects
Genres
Documentary television programs
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Published
Arlington, VA : PBS [2017]
Edition
Theatrical version ; widescreen
Language
English
Item Description
Widescreen (16x9)
Originally broadcast as an episode of American Experience on February 7, 2017.
Physical Description
1 videodisc (approimately 101 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in
Format
DVD, NTSC, region 1; widescreen (16x9) presentation; Region 1; 5.1 surround.
Audience
Rating: not rated.
Production Credits
Music by David Cieri ; edited by Don Kleszy ; director of photography, Stephen McCarthy.
ISBN
9781531701437
1531701434
Other Authors
Barak Goodman (-)
Review by Library Journal Reviews

On April 19, 1995, a truck bomb created by 27-year-old Timothy McVeigh destroyed the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. Among the 168 killed were 19 children attending day care. Starting with an audiotape of a meeting interrupted by the explosion at 9:02 a.m., this film then goes back to explore the people and events that influenced McVeigh. Photos, maps, drawings, news clips, and interviews are masterfully woven together to tell that story. A gun lover, disillusioned by killing enemy soldiers in the first Iraq War, then swayed by white supremacists, McVeigh found the forces led by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the FBI at Ruby Ridge, ID (Randy Weaver), and Waco, TX (David Koresh, Branch Davidians), to be guilty of murdering innocents. Now motivated, McVeigh chose his target and built the bomb. Viewers see the ongoing impact on survivors, the tension-filled capture of McVeigh, and his trial, inability to repent, and execution. VERDICT A fascinating and chilling narrative well told, this film is highly recommended for adult collections.—Cliff Glaviano, formerly with Bowling Green State Univ. Libs., OH Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Oklahoma City traces the events that led McVeigh to that day and recounts the stories of the survivors, first-responders, U.S. Marshals, FBI investigators and journalists who covered the events. The film provides an in-depth and provocative exploration of the white supremacist, extremist militia movement that rose to prominence in the early 1990s and still makes news today."

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Recounts the events of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.