Swimming with sharks The daring discoveries of Eugenie Clark

Heather Lang, 1966-

Book - 2016

"The true story about the girl who grew up to be the 'Shark Lady' and became one of the most inspiring scientists in the world"--Back cover.

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Subjects
Genres
Biographies Juvenile literature
Published
Chicago, Illinois : Albert Whitman & Company 2016.
Language
English
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN
0807521876
9780807521878
Main Author
Heather Lang, 1966- (-)
Other Authors
Jordi Solano (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Eugenie Clark's interest in sharks began early in life, when regular visits to the New York Aquarium led not to a fear of the giant fish but a fascination. As a girl growing up in the 1930s, opportunities were slim for Genie; her mother suggested she be a scientist's secretary. But as this picture-book biography attests, Genie embraced her passion, achieving a master's degree in zoology, working for an ichthyologist, and eventually opening a laboratory where she studied sharks in their natural habitat. Until her death in 2015, she remained fully committed to the study of marine life and made invaluable contributions regarding the biology and reputation of sharks. Solano's illustrations, primarily in a watery blue-green palette, mainly depict Genie's explorations underwater, interspersed with notebook pages showing occasional sketches and notes. The coverage is fairly general, although an author's note provides more in-depth information on Genie, including a discussion of the discrimination she faced as both a woman and a Japanese American, as well as additional background information about sharks. Copyright 2016 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 3—This engaging and richly illustrated picture book biography depicts scientist Eugenie Clark's groundbreaking work with sharks. Using clear, kid-friendly prose with just the right amount of scientific detail, Lang introduces readers to Clark as a young child transfixed by sharks at the New York Aquarium. Focused on becoming an ichthyologist (a fish scientist) and undeterred by the lack of women in her field, Clark took every relevant class available, earning a master's degree in zoology. Soon, the ocean was her classroom, and as she explored the underwater world, she collected and observed as much data as she could. In 1955, Clark opened the Cape Haze Marine Laboratory in Florida, where her work with sharks developed even further, earning her the nickname "Shark Lady." Lang's wonder-filled narrative makes for an inspiring tale of a successful female scientist, with a decided emphasis on her successes. An author's note mentions some discrimination Clark faced as a woman and a Japanese American. However, this is not addressed in the main text. Nevertheless, students will enjoy this account of a scientist's close work with such fearsome creatures. Solano's gorgeous illustrations, done in a soothing, muted palette of greens and blues, suggest the ocean and enhance this selection's appeal. VERDICT An excellent addition to any collection, particularly those looking to expand their stories of women in STEM.—Kristy Pasquariello, Wellesley Free Library, MA. Copyright 2016 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

This picture book biography follows the life of Eugenie Clark, the Japanese-American scientist, researcher, and diver, who became famous as "The Shark Lady" for her groundbreaking discoveries about shark behavior.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

2017 Amelia Bloomer List, Early Readers NonfictionBefore Eugenie Clark's groundbreaking research, most people thought sharks were vicious, blood-thirsty killers. From the first time she saw a shark in an aquarium, Japanese-American Eugenie was enthralled. Instead of frightening and ferocious eating machines, she saw sleek, graceful fish gliding through the water. After she became a scientist—an unexpected career path for a woman in the 1940s—she began taking research dives and training sharks, earning her the nickname "The Shark Lady."

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A picture book introduction to the Japanese-American scientist, researcher and diver who became famously known as "The Shark Lady" because of her groundbreaking discoveries about shark behavior describes how in childhood she disregarded scary stories and admired sharks as graceful and clever sea creatures.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

A biography of the scientist known as the "Shark Lady," reveals how she turned a childhood passion into her life's work, devoting herself to studying sharks and educating the public on the graceful, clever sea creatures.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

Nominee:2017 Amelia Bloomer List, Early Readers NonfictionBefore Eugenie Clark's groundbreaking research, most people thought sharks were vicious, blood-thirsty killers. From the first time she saw a shark in an aquarium, Japanese-American Eugenie was enthralled. Instead of frightening and ferocious eating machines, she saw sleek, graceful fish gliding through the water. After she became a scientist'an unexpected career path for a woman in the 1940s'she began taking research dives and training sharks, earning her the nickname "The Shark Lady."