The Baker Street jurors

Michael Robertson, 1951-

Book - 2016

"Michael Robertson has delighted mystery readers and Sherlock Holmes aficionados everywhere with his charming and innovative Baker Street mystery series, where brothers Reggie and Nigel Heath are charged with answering letters to Sherlock that arrive at their law office, located at 221B Baker Street. In the exclusive London suburb of Hampstead Heath, Rory McSweeny--a true national hero, having led the England cricket team to successive international championships--is accused of murdering hi...s own wife with his own cricket bat. As preparations are made for the trial, the Royal Mail delivers two jury summonses to a law chambers located at Dorset House in the two hundred block of Baker Street. One summons is addressed to Nigel Heath. The other is addressed to Sherlock Holmes. And because Baker Street Law Chambers encompasses the address 221B Baker Street, both letters end up on Nigel's desk. There are twelve empaneled jurors--plus the alternates. But, an unfortunate accident befalls one of the jurors. And then things get worse. Jurors are dropping like flies, and they don't know who is doing it or why--or which of them will be next"--

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Series
Robertson, Michael, 1951- Baker Street mystery.
Subjects
Genres
Mystery fiction
Published
New York : Minotaur Books 2016.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Item Description
"A Thomas Dunne book."
Physical Description
260 pages ; 22 cm
ISBN
9781250060068
1250060060
Main Author
Michael Robertson, 1951- (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

This is the fifth installment in the entertaining saga of brothers Reggie and Nigel Heath, London lawyers operating out of 221B Baker Street. One of their main responsibilities is handling the mail sent to Sherlock Holmes. This time, as Nigel runs the shop alone, a jury summons arrives. Nigel is chosen as an alternate on a grisly murder case, but readers will likely find the details less interesting than the tall, thin fellow, also an alternate, who keeps interrupting the procedure with bizarre questions and observations. Where was the cleaning staff? Are there reasons to be skeptical of one witness, who recently had a full body wax? When the jurors begin dying mysteriously, it's this man, who says his name is Siger—formerly Sigerson, a Holmes alias—who confronts the killer ahead of the police. Robertson writes in a fluid style edged with irony, which keeps us reading while we cheer Nigel's efforts to find out just whom this Siger is. In the last pages we learn much—but want still more. Will Siger be back for book six? Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Reggie and Nigel Heath's law offices are located at 221B Baker Street, the famous address of Sherlock Holmes. When they first moved in, their lease stipulated all mail addressed to Holmes would be answered, a task that fell to Nigel. Apparently, the Crown Court Jury Selection believes Holmes exists because they issue the famous detective a jury summons that Nigel discards. When Nigel receives a summons of his own, he winds up in the pool of prospective jurors for a high-profile case in which an English cricket champion is accused of murdering his wife with his cricket bat. As apparently random accidents befall individual jurists, Nigel wonders if anyone will survive to render a verdict. VERDICT Featuring plenty of inside Sherlockian wit and cross-references, this fifth entry (after Moriarty Returns a Letter) will be enjoyed by devotees of Arthur Conan Doyle's illustrious sleuth who will relish the contemporary take. A solid choice for those who appreciate the humor of Paul Levine's "Jake Lassiter" series. [Page 59]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Agatha Christie fans will revel in Robertson's fifth novel featuring London solicitor Nigel Heath (after 2014's Moriarty Returns a Letter). Two jury summonses arrive at 221B Baker Street, which is the address of Nigel's law firm, Baker Street Law Chambers: one for Sherlock Holmes, the other for Nigel. The attorney discards the one for Holmes by making it into a paper airplane and throwing it out the window. To his dismay, the claim on his own time isn't dispensed with that easily, and he ends up as an alternate on the highest-profile case of the day. Superstar cricketer Liam McSweeney, on whose skills rest Britain's hopes for an international championship, has been charged with bludgeoning his wife to death with his cricket bat. Nigel's own experience in the courtroom enables him to second-guess both the prosecution and the defense, and the proceedings are made livelier by an eccentric juror with a penchant for quoting Conan Doyle. This is Robertson's best work yet, a classic fair play whodunit leavened with humor. Agent: Kirby Kim, William Morris Endeavor. (July) [Page ]. Copyright 2016 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Michael Robertson has delighted mystery readers and Sherlock Holmes aficionados everywhere with his charming and innovative Baker Street mystery series, where brothers Reggie and Nigel Heath are charged with answering letters to Sherlock that arrive at their law office, located at 221B Baker Street. In the exclusive London suburb of Hampstead Heath, Rory McSweeny--a true national hero, having led the England cricket team to successive international championships--is accused of murdering his own wife with his own cricket bat. As preparations are made for the trial, the Royal Mail delivers two jury summonses to a law chambers located at Dorset House in the two hundred block of Baker Street. One summons is addressed to Nigel Heath. The other is addressed to Sherlock Holmes. And because Baker Street Law Chambers encompasses the address 221B Baker Street, both letters end up on Nigel's desk. There are twelve empaneled jurors--plus the alternates. But, an unfortunate accident befalls one of the jurors. And then things get worse. Jurors are dropping like flies, and they don't know who is doing it or why--or which of them will be next"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

When a British cricket star is accused of murdering his wife, Nigel Heath and Sherlock Holmes are summoned for a trial that is overshadowed by suspicious attacks on jurors. By the author of Moriarty Returns a Letter.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

When a British cricket star is accused of murdering his wife, Nigel Heath and Sherlock Holmes are summoned for a trial that is overshadowed by suspicious attacks on jurors.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Michael Robertson has delighted mystery readers and Sherlock Holmes aficionados everywhere with his charming and innovative Baker Street mystery series, where brothers Reggie and Nigel Heath are charged with answering letters to Sherlock that arrive at their law office, located at 221B Baker Street.Everyone must do jury duty. Even Sherlock Holmes.A nation’s greatest sports hero has been accused of murder. The trial is approaching, and the public is clamoring—both for and against. And in a desperate, computer-generated quest to fill its quota of jurors, the Crown Court has included on its summons list the known occupants—real and otherwise—of 221B Baker Street. One summons is addressed to Sherlock Holmes; it doesn’t matter to the Crown Court Jury Selection Service whether Holmes is real or fictional, or in which century he existed.The other is addressed to Mr. Nigel Heath—who is living and sleeping on the couch in his office at Baker Street Chambers. With Nigel in the jury selection pool are a lovely young woman with a mysterious tattoo, an elderly widow with piercing blue eyes and a mind like a tack, a slick millennial whose occupation is cornering the market on prescription drugs, and a tall man with an aquiline nose who seems reluctant to say exactly how he received his jury summons.Before the trial is done, Nigel and each of his fellow prospective jurors will wonder not only which of them will be impaneled—and what verdict they will reach—but also who will survive to render it.