What a beautiful morning

Arthur A. Levine, 1962-

Book - 2016

When his grandpa seems to have forgotten how to do the things that they love, Noah's grandma steps in, while Noah tries to find something he can share with his grandpa.

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jE/Levine
2 / 2 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Levine Checked In
Children's Room jE/Levine Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
Philadelphia : RP Kids [2016]
Language
English
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
ISBN
9780762459063
0762459069
Main Author
Arthur A. Levine, 1962- (author)
Other Authors
Katie Kath (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Watching a relative change as a result of dementia or Alzheimer's is difficult for anyone but especially for a child, and Levine gracefully captures such a childhood experience here. Noah loves visiting his grandparents. His grandfather wakes up singing and makes the whole day special for Noah. One year, however, Noah can see that Grandpa is different. He can't remember how to cut his toast, and even worse, one day he does not remember Noah. Evocative watercolor-and-ink illustrations make the shift evident. Fun-loving Grandpa is depicted in exuberant, cheerful colors. Targeted spots in the illustrations are rendered in gray to show small changes. Then a dramatic, two-page spread is completely black, white, and gray when Noah can no longer hope that nothing is wrong. Happily, however, there are sunny spots, when Grandpa lights up at the sounds of their songs. When Noah plays the piano or sings, Grandpa remembers and joins in. Grandma steps up to do more things with Noah and helps him understand that he must appreciate what Grandpa "still has, not focus on what he's lost." Though he's missing something, he's still Grandpa. The message is beautifully and sensitively communicated in these gentle pages. A comforting, honest resource, ideal for little ones confronted with aging relatives. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Noah's grandfather has always been boisterous and full of song, launching each day with a signature catchphrase—"What's on the docket?"—that promises nonstop fun. But this summer, Grandpa's memory is failing him, and he doesn't always recognize Noah; Kath's (More Than Enough) watercolors depict the older man with the radiance literally drained from his face. While never mentioning a specific medical condition, Grandma tells a devastated Noah that "we have to appreciate what he still has, not focus on what he's lost." As Noah comes to terms with his new relationship with Grandpa, including learning that singing can still connect them to each other, his sense of the world widens: he can have "his own docket" (acting independently in the world), as well as a docket with Grandma, who, one senses, has always been a willing second banana to her lively husband. It's a lovely, bittersweet story, and Levine (Monday Is One Day) carefully modulates a challenging emotional arc, offering readers just the right measure of hope. Ages 4–8. Author's agent: Susan Cohen, Writers House. Illustrator's agent: Justin Rucker, Shannon Associates. (Aug.) [Page ]. Copyright 2016 PWxyz LLC

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 2—Noah loves visiting his grandparents and especially spending time with Grandpa. Summer days there always begin with a "booming song" about a beautiful morning. Grandma is no morning up-and-at-'em person, so Noah and Grandpa bring her a nice cup of coffee to help her day get started. Then they go for a walk with the dog, rain or shine, singing all the way. Back home for breakfast, they make their plans and check "what's on the docket" for the day. This particular summer, however, things are different. Grandpa forgets to ask about the docket, and one morning he can't even remember how to cut his French toast. Even worse, one day Grandpa fails to recognize Noah when he wakes up from a nap. These changes are scary and make Noah very sad. Grandma tries to explain and helps Noah focus on appreciating "what [Grandpa] still has…not on what he's lost," even though that means some days Noah completes his docket all by himself. One day when Noah is playing the piano and singing loudly, Grandpa joins in, just like old times. Lunch goes pretty well, too, as Noah sings Grandpa's favorite Tuna Fish Sandwich Song. But it's not really the same anymore. So Grandma and Noah come up with a docket plan themselves while Grandpa naps. Some days for Noah and Grandpa seem like old times, and some don't, but they'll go on their walks together still, singing "as long as the song would last." Kath's charming illustrations are done in watercolor and ink. She hints at Grandpa's state of mind by changing the color of his shirt and scenery from full color to grays as the dementia takes over. The layout is easy on the eye, and the book remains child focused and upbeat. VERDICT This sweet and tender story about dealing with change and loss is suitable for sharing in a group or one-on-one. No happy ending here, but a satisfyingly realistic one all the same.—Roxanne Burg, Orange County Public Library, CA [Page 58]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Every morning is beautiful when Noah visits his Grandparents. When Grandpa and Noah wake up, they take off singing and hardly stop: walking the dog, splashing through puddles, and eating French toast with cinnamon. But one summer Grandpa seems to have forgotten how to do the things they love. Does he even know who Noah is? Grandma steps in energetically, filling in as best she can. But it is Noah who finds the way back to something he can share with Grandpa. Something musical. Something that makes the morning beautiful again. This is a story about how love helps us find even what we think is lost"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

When his grandpa seems to have forgotten how to do the things that they love, Noah's grandma steps in, while Noah tries to find something he can share with his grandpa.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Sharing beautiful mornings enjoying French toast and dog walks with his grandfather, little Noah is challenged to find ways to reconnect with him when the elder man's memory is affected by Alzheimer's. Simultaneous eBook. 17,500 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Every morning is beautiful when Noah visits his Grandparents. When Grandpa and Noah wake up, they take off singing and hardly stop: walking the dog, splashing through puddles, and eating French toast with cinnamon. But one summer Grandpa seems to have forgotten how to do the things they love. Does he even know who Noah is? Grandma steps in energetically, filling in as best she can. But it is Noah who finds the way back to something he can share with Grandpa. Something musical. Something that makes the morning beautiful again. This is a story about how love helps us find even what we think is lost.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

Every morning is beautiful when Noah visits his Grandparents. When Grandpa and Noah wake up, they take off singing and hardly stop: walking the dog, splashing through puddles, and eating French toast with cinnamon.But one summer Grandpa seems to have forgotten how to do the things they love. Does he even know who Noah is?Grandma steps in energetically, filling in as best she can. But it is Noah who finds the way back to something he can share with Grandpa. Something musical. Something that makes the morning beautiful again.This is a story about how love helps usfind even what we think is lost.