The other Paris

Luc Sante

Sound recording - 2015

Luc Sante reveals the city's hidden past, its seamy underside once populated by working and criminal classes that, though virtually extinct today, have shaped Paris over the past two centuries.

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

COMPACT DISC/944.361/Sante
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor COMPACT DISC/944.361/Sante Checked In
Subjects
Published
[Minneapolis, MN] : HighBridge Audio [2015]
Edition
Unabridged
Language
English
Physical Description
9 audio discs (approximately 11 hours, 15 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in
ISBN
9781622319244
1622319249
Main Author
Luc Sante (-)
  • Capital
  • Ghosts
  • Pantruche
  • Zone
  • La Canaille
  • Archipelago
  • Le Business
  • Saint Monday
  • Show People
  • Mort aux Vaches
  • The Insurgents
  • The Game.
Review by Library Journal Reviews

In his first book, 1991's Low Life, Sante explores New York City's brutal past. Here he uses the idea of the flâneur, a stroller who is familiar with a cityscape by walking along its sidewalks, to walk the listener through the past of the City of Light. Sante believes that the old Paris, with rich and poor inhabitants sharing space intimately, was preferable to the current separation. Spending time with and sharing examples from authors, leaders, artists, and luminaries from throughout the history of Paris is quite interesting, but Sante's style can be confusing for those not familiar with Paris's layout and districts. Sante narrates his own work admirably, moving between English and occasional French with ease. VERDICT The print book, which includes many images and illustrations, will be a better purchase. This title will have limited appeal for most listeners; however, fans of everything Paris will find it interesting. ["A fascinating stroll through a vanished, wild past": LJ 8/15 review of the Farrar hc.]—Jason L. Steagall, Gateway Technical Coll. Lib., Elkhorn, WI [Page 55]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Paris, the City of Light. The city of the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre, of soft cheese and fresh baguettes. Or so tourist brochures would have you believe. In The Other Paris: The People's City, Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Luc Sante reveals the city’s hidden past, its seamy underside—one populated by working and criminal classes that, though virtually extinct today, have shaped Paris over the past two centuries.Drawing on testimony from a great range of witnesses—from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and tramps—Sante, whose thorough research is matched only by the vividness of his narration, takes the reader on a whirlwind tour. Richly illustrated with more than three hundred images, The Other Paris scuttles through the knotted streets of pre-Haussmann Paris; through the improvised accommodations of the original bohemians; through the massive garbage dump at Montfaucon, active until 1849, in which, “at any given time the carcasses of 12,000 horses . . . were left to rot.”A wildly lively survey of labor conditions, prostitution, drinking, crime, and popular entertainment, of the reporters, réaliste singers, pamphleteers, and poets who chronicled their evolution, The Other Paris is a book meant to upend the story of the French capital, to reclaim the city from the bon vivants and the speculators, and to hold a light to the works and days of the forgotten poor. 

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Paris, the City of Light. The city of the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre, of soft cheese and fresh baguettes. Or so tourist brochures would have you believe. In The Other Paris: The People's City, Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Luc Sante reveals the city's hidden past, its seamy underside-one populated by working and criminal classes that, though virtually extinct today, have shaped Paris over the past two centuries.Drawing on testimony from a great range of witnesses-from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and tramps-Sante, whose thorough research is matched only by the vividness of his narration, takes the reader on a whirlwind tour. Richly illustrated with more than three hundred images, The Other Paris scuttles through the knotted streets of pre-Haussmann Paris; through the improvised accommodations of the original bohemians; through the massive garbage dump at Montfaucon, active until 1849, in which, "at any given time the carcasses of 12,000 horses . . . were left to rot."A wildly lively survey of labor conditions, prostitution, drinking, crime, and popular entertainment, of the reporters, realiste singers, pamphleteers, and poets who chronicled their evolution, The Other Paris is a book meant to upend the story of the French capital, to reclaim the city from the bon vivants and the speculators, and to hold a light to the works and days of the forgotten poor.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The Other Paris is a book meant to upend the story of the French capital, to reclaim the city from the bon vivants and the speculators, and to hold a light to the works and days of the forgotten poor.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Paris, the City of Light. The city of the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre, of soft cheese and fresh baguettes. Or so tourist brochures would have you believe. In The Other Paris: The People's City, Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Luc Sante reveals the city's hidden past, its seamy underside-one populated by working and criminal classes that, though virtually extinct today, have shaped Paris over the past two centuries.Drawing on testimony from a great range of witnesses-from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and tramps-Sante, whose thorough research is matched only by the vividness of his narration, takes the reader on a whirlwind tour. Richly illustrated with more than three hundred images, The Other Paris scuttles through the knotted streets of pre-Haussmann Paris; through the improvised accommodations of the original bohemians; through the massive garbage dump at Montfaucon, active until 1849, in which, "at any given time the carcasses of 12,000 horses . . . were left to rot."A wildly lively survey of labor conditions, prostitution, drinking, crime, and popular entertainment, of the reporters, realiste singers, pamphleteers, and poets who chronicled their evolution, The Other Paris is a book meant to upend the story of the French capital, to reclaim the city from the bon vivants and the speculators, and to hold a light to the works and days of the forgotten poor.