The Nazi hunters

Andrew Nagorski

Book - 2016

"Describes the small group of men and women who sought out former Nazis all over the world after the Nuremberg trials, refusing to let their crimes be forgotten or allowing them to quietly live inconspicuous, normal lives."--NoveList.

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Subjects
Published
New York, NY : Simon & Schuster 2016.
Edition
First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
Language
English
Physical Description
xv, 393 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 331-371) and index.
ISBN
9781476771861
1476771863
9781476771878
1476771871
Main Author
Andrew Nagorski (author)
Review by Library Journal Reviews

Former Newsweek journalist Nagorski, who previously chronicled the Nazis' rise to power in his 2013 work Hitlerland, now turns his attention to the postwar quest to bring Nazi war criminals to justice. In addition to recounting the Nuremberg Trials after World War II, the author provides fascinating insight into those who continued to pursue war criminals after the spotlight had faded. Some of these figures are well known—Serge and Beate Klarsfeld and Simon Wiesenthal—others are more obscure such as Alabama lawyer William Denson, who participated not only in the prosecution of Nazis in Germany but also served as a mentor to government investigators pursuing Nazi criminals living in the United States. Nagorski's analysis of the variations in approach between government and private Nazi hunters is informational. Of particular interest is how the tensions among various individuals and organizations can magnify in the media spotlight, such as the 1980s revelation of Austrian politician Kurt Waldheim being a former member of the Wehrmacht. VERDICT Recommended for public libraries and specialized collections.—Frederic Krome, Univ. of Cincinnati Clermont Coll. [Page 123]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Describes the small group of men and women who sought out former Nazis all over the world after the Nuremberg trials, refusing to let their crimes be forgotten or allowing them to quietly live inconspicuous, normal lives.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Describes the small group of men and women who sought out former Nazis all over the world after the Nuremberg trials, refusing to let their crimes be forgotten or allow them to quietly live inconspicuous, normal lives.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

'[A] deep and sweeping account of a relentless search for justice.' 'The Washington PostMore than seven decades after the end of the Second World War, the era of the Nazi Hunters is drawing to a close as they and the hunted die off. Their saga can now be told almost in its entirety.After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Many of the lower-ranking perpetrators quickly blended in with the millions who were seeking to rebuild their lives in a new Europe, while those who felt most at risk fled the continent. The Nazi Hunters focuses on the small band of men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten'and who were determined to track them down to the furthest corners of the earth.The Nazi Hunters reveals the experiences of the young American prosecutors in the Nuremberg and Dachau trials, Benjamin Ferencz and William Denson; the Polish investigating judge Jan Sehn, who handled the case of Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Höss; Germany's judge and prosecutor Fritz Bauer, who repeatedly forced his countrymen to confront their country's record of mass murder; the Mossad agent Rafi Eitan, who was in charge of the Israeli team that nabbed Eichmann; and Eli Rosenbaum, who rose to head the US Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations that belatedly sought to expel war criminals who were living quietly in the United States. But some of the Nazi hunters' most controversial actions involved the more ambiguous cases, such as former UN Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim's attempt to cover up his wartime history. Or the fate of concentration camp guards who have lived into their nineties, long past the time when reliable eyewitnesses could be found to pinpoint their exact roles.The story of the Nazi hunters is coming to a natural end. It was unprecedented in so many ways, especially the degree to which the initial impulse of revenge was transformed into a struggle for justice. The Nazi hunters have transformed our fundamental notions of right and wrong. Andrew Nagorski's book is a richly reconstructed odyssey and an unforgettable tale of gritty determination, at times reckless behavior, and relentless pursuit.