Looking for Bongo

Eric Velasquez

Book - 2016

"When a boy's abuela accuses him of being careless with his beloved Bongo, he devises a trap and catches the toy thief red-handed"--

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Velasquez Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Holiday House [2016]
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
ISBN
9780823435654
0823435652
Main Author
Eric Velasquez (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

From the cover illustration of a boy on his knees, peeking around the corner with big, questioning eyes, mystery is inherent here. Special toy Bongo is missing, and his owner wants him back. He asks his abuela, the cat, the dog, and his father, and even interrupts his sister's hair teasing, but no one has seen the missing Bongo, now suspected to be stolen. Velasquez's text is a simple mix of English and easily decipherable Spanish, although a glossary at the end confirms translations. The illustrations of the narrator's quest are active, consisting of many gestures and close-up facial expressions, and the colors are warm creams, blues, and oranges. Home life is multigenerational and loving. The culprit, who is finally caught at the end, is a believable thief and makes this family all the more realistic. Pair with Where's Mommy? (2014), by Beverly Donofrio, for another story of lost and found. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS—An Afro Latino boy searches for his missing stuffed toy in this tender tribute to family, music, and childhood. The adorable narrator, depicted charmingly with a puffy Afro, protruding tummy, inquisitive eyes, and pj's, inquires after the whereabouts of his beloved Bongo. With Spanish-peppered text, the toddler asks his parents, the family pets, his Wela (abuela), and even the delivery man for help but finally finds the toy dog on his own. When his grandmother suggests that Bongo's disappearance is due to his owner's negligence, the boy comes up with a plan to figure out the mystery. Small clues sprinkled throughout will invite repeat readings, and savvy children may guess the identity of the true culprit. The warm, vibrant oil paintings illuminate in obvious and not so obvious ways the family's love of music, literature, and their African roots. Pinterest-worthy bookshelves, African art on the walls, and rhythm instruments, such as congas and bongos, are present throughout, and they offer an inviting backdrop. The mostly brown and orange palette invokes a 1970s vibe, though the story takes place in the present, and the narrator's mother's Audrey Hepburn style gives this tale, inspired by the author's own upbringing, a nostalgic undertone. Velasquez's Grandma's Records (Walker, 2001) makes a cameo during the boy's bedtime ritual. And as in that previous title, this work's celebration of the diversity within Latino culture will warm hearts. VERDICT A sweet tale recommended for diverse toddler storytimes and one-on-one sharing.—Shelley Diaz, School Library Journal [Page 58]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS—An Afro Latino boy searches for his missing stuffed toy in this tender tribute to family, music, and childhood. The adorable narrator, depicted charmingly with a puffy Afro, protruding tummy, inquisitive eyes, and pj's, inquires after the whereabouts of his beloved Bongo. With Spanish-peppered text, the toddler asks his parents, the family pets, his Wela (abuela), and even the delivery man for help but finally finds the toy dog on his own. When his grandmother suggests that Bongo's disappearance is due to his owner's negligence, the boy comes up with a plan to figure out the mystery. Small clues sprinkled throughout will invite repeat readings, and savvy children may guess the identity of the true culprit. The warm, vibrant oil paintings illuminate in obvious and not so obvious ways the family's love of music, literature, and their African roots. Pinterest-worthy bookshelves, African art on the walls, and rhythm instruments, such as congas and bongos, are present throughout, and they offer an inviting backdrop. The mostly brown and orange palette invokes a 1970s vibe, though the story takes place in the present, and the narrator's mother's Audrey Hepburn style gives this tale, inspired by the author's own upbringing, a nostalgic undertone. Velasquez's Grandma's Records (Walker, 2001) makes a cameo during the boy's bedtime ritual. And as in that previous title, this work's celebration of the diversity within Latino culture will warm hearts. VERDICT A sweet tale recommended for diverse toddler storytimes and one-on-one sharing.—Shelley Diaz, School Library Journal [Page 58]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS—An Afro-Latino boy searches for his missing stuffed toy. The adorable toddler, depicted charmingly with a puffy Afro, protruding tummy, inquisitive eyes, and pj's, inquires after the whereabouts of his beloved Bongo. The warm oil paintings illuminate in obvious and not-so-obvious ways the family's love of music, literature, and their African roots. Velasquez's Grandma's Records makes a cameo during the boy's bedtime ritual. And as in that previous title, this work's celebration of the diversity within Latinx culture will warm hearts. Copyright 2017 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"When a boy's abuela accuses him of being careless with his beloved Bongo, he devises a trap and catches the toy thief red-handed"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Looking everywhere for his missing stuffed toy, a little boy enlists the aid of his abuela, mother, father and cat before discovering the toy behind his father's drums and setting a trap to catch the culprit that hid it there.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

When a boy's abuela accuses him of being careless with his beloved Bongo, he devises a trap and catches the toy thief red-handed.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Where could Bongo be? Help a young boy find his beloved toy—and figure out how he got lost to begin with.   The boy knows Bongo was right there with him this morning—but suddenly, Bongo is missing. He asks his whole family if they've seen the stuffed toy.  "Yo no sé," says abuela, "I don't know."    Mom and Dad haven't seen him either. And Gato just meows and runs away.    When he finds Bongo, the boy is thrilled—but he still doesn't understand how his toy ended up there. So he sets a trap to catch the Bongo thief. . . .   Eric Velasquez's detailed, expressive illustrations follow the boy's investigation throughout his home, giving a glimpse at a warm, multi-generational family.  A Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year