Crocopotamus Mix and match the wild animals

Mary Murphy, 1961-

Book - 2016

Mixes and matches the front and back halves of animals to create brand new animals, including a zeger, lipotamus, and an eledile.

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jBOARD BOOK/Murphy
0 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jBOARD BOOK/Murphy Due Jul 9, 2024
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Board books
Published
Somerville, Massachusetts : Candlewick Press [2016]
Language
English
Main Author
Mary Murphy, 1961- (author)
Edition
First U.S. edition
Item Description
Cover title.
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 22 cm
ISBN
9780763681029
Contents unavailable.
Review by Booklist Review

In this cleverly designed mix-and-match board book, little ones flip pages to make silly combinations of critters. Opening from the middle, each pair of pages together reveals a brightly colored animal rendered in thick, saturated tones and pleasingly scraggy edges, but turn one side a few more pages and Tiger becomes Tibra with the head of an orange-and-black big cat and the hindquarters of a similarly stripy equine. Kiddos will love exploring the many mixed-up critters, and the whimsical new names Hippoon, Monpotamus, Crocokey, and so on are sure to elicit giggles. Sturdy pages guarantee lots of gleeful flipping.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2016 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by School Library Journal Review

PreS-A colorful and fun book featuring sturdy flaps to mix and match to create a variety of wild animals. It includes seven different animals whose fronts and backs can be interchanged with one another, resulting in silly combinations such as a "Monger" (monkey and tiger), a "Libra" (lion and zebra), and the titular "Crocopotamus" (crocodile and hippopotamus). While seemingly simplistic, this board book offers an enjoyable, interactive experience for toddlers. The hand-lettered text is minimal, consisting of only the animal names, placing the focus primarily on the effective mix-and-match aspect of the book. The eye-catching illustrations are done in mixed media and feature bold, vibrant colors that pop against a white background, and the wild animals are appropriately designed to look playful and friendly. The solid flaps are well built and should hold up to repeated use, while the smaller board book format is perfectly suited for little hands and one-on-one sharing. VERDICT Young children will have a blast flipping the flaps to see all the different possibilities.-Laura J. Giunta, Garden City Public Library, NY © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Kirkus Book Review

Mix and match the seven wild animals to create new crazy animals with silly names. In this board book that opens from the middle thanks to vertically split pages, seven wild animals become a great many number of animals, as the front half of each one can be interchanged with the back half of each to create new, funny, and improbable animals. What can an elephant, a tiger, a crocodile, a zebra, a lion, a hippopotamus, or monkey become? A tibra, a likey, a zedile, a hippophant, or a crocoon, perhaps? The animals are illustrated in bold, bright colors and formed into simple, clear shapes that will appeal to young children. The sturdy pages are perfect for read-alone (or -together) fun for very young children. Older children ready to play with sounds and the smaller parts of words and their adult readers will enjoy coming up with silly new namesand trying to pronounce them! It is a rare find to have a book that so easily and enjoyably allows the practice of phonemic awareness, an essential pre-literacy skill. With 49 possible combinations, this is a book that can be looked at over and over again. What fun! (Board book. 2-4) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.