Trash talk! Moving toward a zero-waste world

Michelle Mulder, 1976-

Book - 2015

"Humans have always generated garbage, whether it's a chewed-on bone or a broken cell phone. Our landfills are overflowing, but with some creative thinking, stuff we once threw away can become a collection of valuable resources just waiting to be harvested. [This book] digs deep into the history of garbage, from Minoan trash pits to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and uncovers some of the many innovative ways people all over the world are dealing with waste"--Amazon.com.

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Series
Orca footprints.
Subjects
Published
Victoria, British Columbia : Orca Book Publishers 2015.
Language
English
Physical Description
48 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 25 cm
Issued also in electronic format
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (page 44) and index.
ISBN
9781459806924
1459806921
Main Author
Michelle Mulder, 1976- (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

A zero-waste world, in which people produce no garbage, seems like an impossible goal, but Mulder asserts that with some creative thinking it can someday become a reality, and she encourages young people to be more mindful about what they discard each day. The opening chapter puts human feelings about waste into historical context by comparing our consumer-driven society with the more conservation-minded attitudes of the past, and examines policies concerning recycling around the world. Mulder focuses not only on reducing consumption but also on how we can recoup some of the energy and resources that are thrown away. Ingenious ideas like insulating homes with jeans or weaving old fishing nets into carpeting are just a couple ideas that will spark readers' imaginations. With full-color photos of kids in action and startling but fascinating trivia about how much trash the world's population produces, this offers a very compelling argument for conservation. The book's mantra—"Take in the trash"—is about finding possibility in unexpected places. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 5–7—Both a history of trash and a manual of its elimination (or diminution, at least), this nifty book covers a variety of topics, from the trash pits (think archaic sanitary landfills) of the ancient Minoans to the gross filth of New York City in 1850. Employing readable language, Mulder chronicles the development of garbage disposal and goes on to castigate our throw-it-away-and-buy-a-new-one way of thinking. She discusses reformatting, reusing, and repairing to lessen the landfill burdens and presents ways to cut down the enormous amounts of rubbish humans produce on a global daily basis. "Trash Facts" pop up, as do "Take in the Trash" notes. Colorful photos record garbage issues around the world and innovative solutions to cope with this mountainous problem. Pair this with such green titles as Kim McKay and Jenny Bonnin's challenging True Green Kids: 100 Things You Can Do to Save the Planet (National Geographic, 2008) and Brad Herzog's simpler but eye-catching S Is for Save the Planet: A How-to-Be-Green Alphabet (Sleeping Bear, 2009) for a further look at our smelly, bulky accumulations and inventive ways to change our wasteful ways. VERDICT An informative call to action for young greenies.—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY [Page 184]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Traces the history of garbage from the Minoan trash pits to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to discuss innovative ways that people all over the world are dealing with waste and inventing ways to transform garbage into a valuable resource.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Humans have always generated garbage, whether it’s a chewed-on bone or a broken cell phone.Our landfills are overflowing, but with some creative thinking, stuff we once threw away can become a collection of valuable resources just waiting to be harvested. Trash Talk digs deep into the history of garbage, from Minoan trash pits to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and uncovers some of the many innovative ways people all over the world are dealing with waste.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

This illustrated book of nonfiction for middle-graders shows how people all over the world are working to keep our planet from drowning in a sea of garbage.