I, fly The buzz about flies and how awesome they are

Bridget Heos

Book - 2015

"Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. After all, flies go through metamorphosis too--and they are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies--maggots--are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that? Both funny and informative, this earnest (and highly partisan) ...narrator provides a refreshing new perspective on his fascinating species."--

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j595.774/Heos
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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room j595.774/Heos Due Jun 11, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York : Henry Holt and Company 2015.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations, color map ; 27 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN
9780805094695
0805094695
Main Author
Bridget Heos (-)
Other Authors
Jennifer Plecas (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

A housefly buzzes into a classroom to find the students learning about butterflies. "I get it," he sighs. "They have such beautiful wings." But onto his teeny tiny soapbox he hops to make a case for the fascinating fly. Flies, you know, metamorphose the same as butterflies, only instead of being called caterpillars, they are called maggots—what's the big deal? "Our mom tucked us into a warm, smelly bed of dog doo," recalls the fly. These "short, greasy white worms" reproduce at a rapid rate, and within days a single fly can spawn thousands of "grandmaggots." Suitably impressed, the students pepper the fly with questions. Do flies really vomit on food before eating it? Do they really spread disease? Well, yes—but, hey, blowflies and maggots help police solve crimes, too, so it all evens out! Like the author's What to Expect When You're Expecting Larvae (2011), this is giggly, gross, and educational, helped along by Plecas, who depicts our protagonist as a wide-eyed, hard-luck guy just trying to make a living. By, you know, eating poop and whatnot. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 2–4—A whimsical approach to the life cycle of flies. Large, colorful illustrations immediately engage readers through dialogue bubbles and colorful cartoons. Children learn all about eggs, larva, pupa, and adulthood through the narration of one fly who resents how much attention butterflies get: "Well, guess who else metamorphoses, can fly, and is beautiful (at least according to my mother)." Understudied and not as well liked, the fly is shown to be an important insect that greatly aids in decomposition and composting; the author includes discussion of maggots, rotting fruit, and environmentalism and dispels the myth that flies are dirty insects. Readers learn how the bugs help solve police crimes and how they further the study of science in the lab. This book will be a lively read-aloud to introduce students to environmentalism or to generate conversation and new ideas and will be enjoyed by independent readers.—Tracey Wong, P.S. 54/Fordham Bedford Academy, Bronx, NY [Page 147]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A whimsical, fact-filled primer follows the experiences of Fly, who describes to a classroom of interested youngsters the characteristics and life cycles of his own species. By the author of Mustache Baby.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A fact-filled primer follows the experiences of Fly, who describes to a classroom of interested youngsters the characteristics and life cycles of his own species.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. After all, flies go through metamorphosis too--and they are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies--maggots--are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that? Both funny and informative, this earnest (and highly partisan) narrator provides a refreshing new perspective on his fascinating species."--

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. Flies are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies—maggots—are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that?In an unforgettably fun, fact-filled presentation, this lovable (and highly partisan) narrator promotes his species to a sometimes engrossed, sometimes grossed-out, class of kids.