This changes everything Capitalism vs. the climate

Naomi Klein, 1970-

Book - 2014

"Klein argues that climate change isn't just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It's an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein ... builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies"--

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Subjects
Published
New York : Simon & Schuster 2014.
Edition
First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
Language
English
Physical Description
x, 566 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781451697391
9781451697384
1451697384
Main Author
Naomi Klein, 1970- (-)
  • One way or another, everything changes
  • The right is right : the revolutionary power of climate change
  • Hot money : how free market fundamentalism helped overheat the planet
  • Public and paid for : overcoming the ideological blocks to the next economy
  • Planning and banning : slapping the invisible hand, building a movement
  • Beyond extractivism : confronting the climate denier within
  • Fruits, not roots : the disastrous merger of big business and big green
  • No messiahs : the green billionaires won't save us
  • Dimming the sun : the solution to pollution is pollution?
  • Blockadia : the new climate warriors
  • Love will save this place : democracy, divestment, and the wins so far
  • You and what army? : indigenous rights and the power of keeping our word
  • Sharing the sky : the atmospheric commons and the power of paying our debts
  • The right to regenerate : moving from extraction to renewal
  • The leap years : just enough time for impossible.
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Journalist Klein is a resolute investigator into the dark side of unchecked capitalism. The author of two previous international best-sellers, including The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007), she has, of late, devoted her exceptional research and reportorial skills to the subject overarching everything else: climate change and the viability of life itself. The result is an enormous, complex, compelling, and, by turns, distressing and rallying analysis of the dysfunctional symbiotic relationships between free-market capitalism, the fossil fuels industry, and global warming.Klein follows the "dark" money behind the propaganda of climate-change denial, the effort to dismantle the federal government to curtail corporate regulation, and the justification for the feverish pursuit of the riskiest forms of carbon-emission-producing energy from tar sands extraction to deep-water drilling, fracking, and mountaintop-removal coal mining. Klein also explains why we feel "locked in––politically, physically, and culturally" to business as usual and unable to make the profound changes needed to avert climate-change disasters. We have it backwards, Klein attests. We certainly can reform our economy; what can't be changed is our utter dependency on nature's processes.Klein circles the planet, chronicling the social and environmental decimation wrought by 30 years of free-market capitalism and corporate greed, noting "a close correlation between low wages and high emissions," and reports on courageous citizens mobilizing to protect local forests, rivers, and farmland, in spite of being confronted by heavily militarized police forces. Klein exposes the failures of the "Big Green" environmental organizations, the dangers of growing corporate political power, and the pressing need for action as we face escalating catastrophic storms and droughts. Within this mammoth mosaic of assiduously collected facts and bold analysis, Klein addresses every aspect of the causes and threats of climate change and the paradox of why we behave as though we value the mythical free-market more than real life itself.This comprehensive, sure-to-be controversial inquiry, one of the most thorough, eloquent, and enlightening books yet on this urgent and overwhelming subject—alongside works by Bill McKibben, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Diane Ackerman—provides the evidence and the reasoning we need to help us shift to a "worldview based on regeneration and renewal rather than domination and depletion." Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Choice Reviews

Putting together the pieces of the climate-change puzzle, Klein (public intellectual and investigative journalist) argues that civilization is, literally, at the point of no return vis-à-vis the climate—and that the threat is existential.  Klein explains the basic science of the climate change crisis and pins responsibility for it on a fuel-extraction industry that, driven by a grow-or-die imperative, pursues carbon reserves via ever dirtier methods of extraction—and has no economic incentive to stop.  Though the situation is dire, an element of hope and optimism runs through this book.  Klein provides a road map to climate stabilization and sustainability.  She argues that the path forward requires populist action at the local level, and she gives numerous examples of what such action and policies look like.  Though some might read here a left-leaning political message, in fact habitability of the planet and survival of the species are post-political issues.  Klein leans away from market-oriented solutions.  Since climate change is a by-product of a market failure—overuse of a basic resource, the planet—solutions must come from outside the market (regulation, taxation, combinations of the two).  Klein's suggestions are appropriate, reasonable, and well researched.  Everyone aspiring to understand climate change should read this book, which could be the most important work of the 21st century. Summing Up: Essential. All readers. --K. J. Murphy, Oakland University Kevin J. Murphy Oakland University http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/CHOICE.191826 Copyright 2014 American Library Association.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Prominent journalist and activist Klein calls for grassroots groups worldwide to enact the changes required to stem the carbon emissions that are leading to climate change. She passionately argues that "the people" need to lead on environmental issues; governments, corporations, and even major environmental groups will not do what's necessary because they are protecting their conjoined political and economic interests. [Page 55]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The struggle for a sustainable world is really a fight against capitalism, according to this sprawling manifesto from Nation columnist Klein (The Shock Doctrine). She gives a rousing, if familiar, rundown of the perils of global warming and singles out energy corporations in particular, and the "extractivist" economic system and ideology in general, as the planet's great enemies. Her proposed remedies include strict regulation of fossil fuels and investments in renewable energy, but also a vision of a low-consumption, no-growth, localist, people-over-profits economy coupled to a social transformation that emphasizes cooperation with nature instead of dominion over it. Klein's gifts for catchy, aphoristic prose and vivid journalistic montage are well-displayed and her critiques sometimes trenchant, as when she skewers hubristic geoengineering schemes, carbon offset scams, and the pseudo-green billionaire Richard Branson. Unfortunately, her grasp of energy policy is questionable: she uncritically repeats renewables boosterism while ignoring their limitations and her dismissal of nuclear power as a low-carbon energy source is ill-informed. By drawing "everything" into her thesis Klein dilutes her over-stuffed book's consistency and coherence; worse, her tendency to demonize more than analyze leaves unaddressed the real-world conflicts and contradictions that make climate policy so intractable. Agent: Amanda Urban, ICM. (Sept.) [Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

Review by PW Annex Reviews

The struggle for a sustainable world is really a fight against capitalism, according to this sprawling manifesto from Nation columnist Klein (The Shock Doctrine). She gives a rousing, if familiar, rundown of the perils of global warming and singles out energy corporations in particular, and the "extractivist" economic system and ideology in general, as the planet's great enemies. Her proposed remedies include strict regulation of fossil fuels and investments in renewable energy, but also a vision of a low-consumption, no-growth, localist, people-over-profits economy coupled to a social transformation that emphasizes cooperation with nature instead of dominion over it. Klein's gifts for catchy, aphoristic prose and vivid journalistic montage are well-displayed and her critiques sometimes trenchant, as when she skewers hubristic geoengineering schemes, carbon offset scams, and the pseudo-green billionaire Richard Branson. Unfortunately, her grasp of energy policy is questionable: she uncritically repeats renewables boosterism while ignoring their limitations and her dismissal of nuclear power as a low-carbon energy source is ill-informed. By drawing "everything" into her thesis Klein dilutes her over-stuffed book's consistency and coherence; worse, her tendency to demonize more than analyze leaves unaddressed the real-world conflicts and contradictions that make climate policy so intractable. Agent: Amanda Urban, ICM. (Sept.) [Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Explains why the environmental crisis should lead to an abandonment of "free market" ideologies and current political systems, arguing that a massive reduction of greenhouse emissions may offer a best chance for correcting problems.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The best-selling author of The Shock Doctor explains why the environmental crisis challenges us to abandon "free market" ideologies and remake political systems, arguing that a massive reduction of greenhouse emissions may offer a best chance for correcting economic challenges. 150,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The most important book yet from the author of the international bestseller The Shock Doctrine, a brilliant explanation of why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.In short, either we embrace radical change ourselves or radical changes will be visited upon our physical world. The status quo is no longer an option.In This Changes Everything Naomi Klein argues that climate change isn’t just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It’s an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein meticulously builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies. She exposes the ideological desperation of the climate-change deniers, the messianic delusions of the would-be geoengineers, and the tragic defeatism of too many mainstream green initiatives. And she demonstrates precisely why the market has not—and cannot—fix the climate crisis but will instead make things worse, with ever more extreme and ecologically damaging extraction methods, accompanied by rampant disaster capitalism.Klein argues that the changes to our relationship with nature and one another that are required to respond to the climate crisis humanely should not be viewed as grim penance, but rather as a kind of gift—a catalyst to transform broken economic and cultural priorities and to heal long-festering historical wounds. And she documents the inspiring movements that have already begun this process: communities that are not just refusing to be sites of further fossil fuel extraction but are building the next, regeneration-based economies right now.Can we pull off these changes in time? Nothing is certain. Nothing except that climate change changes everything. And for a very brief time, the nature of that change is still up to us.