Atlas of Indian nations

Anton Treuer

Maps - 2013

Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell. Organized by region, this encyclopedic reference details Indian tribes in these areas: beliefs, sustenance, shelter, alliances and animosities, key historical events, and more. See the linguistic groupings and understand the constantly shifting, overl...apping boundaries of the tribes. Follow the movement, growth, decline, and continuity of Indian nations and their lifestyles.

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2nd Floor 970.1/Treuer Due Aug 25, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Atlases
Published
Washington, DC : National Geographic Books c2013.
Edition
1st edition
Language
English
Physical Description
1 atlas (319 pages) : illustrations, color maps, photos (some col) ; 29 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (page 303) and index.
ISBN
9781426212567
1426212569
9781426211607
1426211600
Main Author
Anton Treuer (-)
  • Introduction
  • Northeast
  • Southeast
  • Arctic and Subarctic
  • Plains
  • Southwest
  • Great Basin and Plateau
  • Northwest coast
  • California
  • Appendix.
  • Introduction
  • NORTHEAST : Natives and Puritans - The European invasion - The Fur trade - Early contact in the northeast - Battle of the Monogahela - The Iroquois League - The Black hawk war - Tribal Histories
  • SOUTHEAST - Moundville - The Secotan and the lost colony - The Five civilized tribes - The Trail of Tears - Land grabs and resistance - Tribal histories
  • ARCTIC AND SUBARTIC : First Arctic encounters - Finding the North Pole - Hudson Bay fur trade - Russian America : company controlled - Tribal Histories
  • PLAINS : The Horse in North America - Mapping Indian Lands - Wars for the Plains - The Sand Creek Massacre - Quest for Metis Independence in Canada - Battle of the Little Bighorn - Wars for the Black Hills - The Wounded Knee Massacre - Dwindling Buffalo Herds - Tribal histories
  • SOUTHWEST : The Pueblo revolt of 1680 - The Santa Fe Trail - Chaco Canyon - Mexico, America and the Apache - The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo - Apache resistance - The Long walk of the Navajo - Tribal histories
  • GREAT BASIN AND PLATEAU : Jedediah Smith - Father Pierre-Jean de Smet - Flight for Freedom - Conflicts in the Great Basin and Plateau - Battle of Four Lakes - Tribal Histories
  • NORTHWEST COAST : The Battle of Sitka - Creating Borders - The Oregon Trail - Northwest Gold Rush - Whaling in the Northwest - Tribal histories
  • CALIFORNIA : Fremont Expeditions - The California Gold Rush - Klamath River Tribes - The Modoc Wars - California Missions - Tribal Histories
  • Appendix.
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

"The land made the first people of North America," insists Ojibwe scholar Treuer (Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians but Were Afraid to Ask), and in this gorgeously illustrated volume employs the atlas format to demonstrate this reality. Chock full of historical and contemporary maps, photographs, and paintings, this smart hybrid of art book and textbook is irresistible to leaf through because of the eye-catching images on every page. But Treuer's clear, accessible text is the complementary gem. The book is divided into eight chapters based on geographical region, each concluding with a set of tribal histories. Forming the core of each chapter are gripping stories of events such as the Trail of Tears and the Battle of Little Bighorn, and brief biographies of notable figures such as the Nez Perce leader Chief Joseph. Not strictly a history book, Treuer's focus on the primacy of land also suggests the interconnection of past and present. In the Arctic and Subarctic, for instance, the impact of climate change on local ecology underscores the contemporary problems, and thus potentially massive cultural changes, faced by local indigenous peoples. This happened before on the Great Plains in the 1870s, when whites killed millions of buffalo. Land, nature, and culture, as Treuer shows, are always intertwined. Illus. (Oct.) [Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

Review by PW Annex Reviews

"The land made the first people of North America," insists Ojibwe scholar Treuer (Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians but Were Afraid to Ask), and in this gorgeously illustrated volume employs the atlas format to demonstrate this reality. Chock full of historical and contemporary maps, photographs, and paintings, this smart hybrid of art book and textbook is irresistible to leaf through because of the eye-catching images on every page. But Treuer's clear, accessible text is the complementary gem. The book is divided into eight chapters based on geographical region, each concluding with a set of tribal histories. Forming the core of each chapter are gripping stories of events such as the Trail of Tears and the Battle of Little Bighorn, and brief biographies of notable figures such as the Nez Perce leader Chief Joseph. Not strictly a history book, Treuer's focus on the primacy of land also suggests the interconnection of past and present. In the Arctic and Subarctic, for instance, the impact of climate change on local ecology underscores the contemporary problems, and thus potentially massive cultural changes, faced by local indigenous peoples. This happened before on the Great Plains in the 1870s, when whites killed millions of buffalo. Land, nature, and culture, as Treuer shows, are always intertwined. Illus. (Oct.) [Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC