Tracking Tyrannosaurs Meet T. rex's fascinating family, from tiny terrors to feathered giants

Christopher Sloan

Book - 2013

"This book will highlight a newly discovered T. rex relative in China with a coat of downy feathers! This one-ton predator is the largest known animal to ever have walked the Earth. This discovery was made public in April 2012, and is a timely addition that sets this book apart from other dinosaur titles. We'll meet 19 kinds of tyrannosaurs--including seven new species discovered in the last two years--that came before T. rex. The names are strange, like Bistahieversor and Zhuchengtyra...nnus. The creatures were strange, too, and many of the newly discovered ones caught scientists by surprise. Filled with engaging, lifelike illustrations by Xing Lida, Tracking Tyrannosaurs explains to kids how T. rex, the most famous, ferocious dinosaur of all time was only one of many tyrannosaurs that lived on Earth for over 100 million years!"--

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Children's Room j567.912/Sloan Due Jul 12, 2022
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Series
National Geographic kids.
Subjects
Published
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic [2013]
Language
English
Physical Description
48 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (page 47) and index.
ISBN
9781426313745
1426313748
9781426313752
1426313756
Main Author
Christopher Sloan (-)
  • What is a Tyrannosaur?
  • Meet the Tyrannosaurs
  • Revealing Tyrannosaur secrets.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Move over, T. rex! You now have a growing family of ancestors. In three chapters, Sloan presents recent developments about the tyrannosaur family. In chapter 1, we learn the difference between tyrannosaur-oids and tyrannosaur-ids. The recently found smaller tyrannosauroids lived much earlier than the giant tyrannosaurids. The clever use of a chart shows the lineage of the tyrannosaurs from their beginnings in the Jurassic period, through the giant tyrannosaurids in the Cretaceous, and ending with modern-day birds. Chapter 2 introduces all of the known tyrannosaurs (-ids and -oids) including the much-acclaimed feathered ones. The last chapter presents a fine overview of the research laboratories and their work scanning ancient bones to learn their secrets. Photographs, drawings, pronunciation guides, a glossary, biographical sketches, resources, and a detailed index complete this finely crafted book on a highly popular (and complex) subject. Copyright 2013 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 5–7—Having a rock star like T. rex in one's family tree pretty much ensures that other tyrannosaurids will find themselves languishing in the wings like amp-toting roadies, but Sloan's new genealogical work certainly pops the spotlight on some nifty critters. The readable text investigates the evolutionary path of this predatory family, providing both a general "Dinosaur Family Tree" as well as a more specific "Tyrannosaur Family Tree"—from the Jurassic through the Cretaceous—to that final line in the rock above which no dino fossils have been found. From that point, Sloan delves into particular "branches." A global location map (including continental-drift insets) is provided, and some nine species are given facing-page units. These are graced with information boxes, size comparisons, a "Dino Database," and, more importantly, a clear presentation of what is known about that dinosaur, including its discovery and physical attributes, and what its existence means on the evolutionary tree. Included are such "new" finds as agile little Guanlong and the 30-foot-long Yutyrannus, surprisingly covered in "long, thick, hairlike feathers." All this is accompanied by some eye-catching, realistic artwork—informative in its own right. Slim, readable, informative, and with a feathery, toothy Yutyrannus clomping through a snowy landscape on the cover, this title will spend a good part of its life out in circulation.—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY [Page 150]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"This book will highlight a newly discovered T. rex relative in China with a coat of downy feathers! This one-ton predator is the largest known animal to ever have walked the Earth. This discovery was made public in April 2012, and is a timely addition that sets this book apart from other dinosaur titles. We'll meet 19 kinds of tyrannosaurs--including seven new species discovered in the last two years--that came before T. rex. The names are strange, like Bistahieversor and Zhuchengtyrannus. The creatureswere strange, too, and many of the newly discovered ones caught scientists by surprise. Filled with engaging, lifelike illustrations by Xing Lida, Tracking Tyrannosaurs explains to kids how T. rex, the most famous, ferocious dinosaur of all time was onlyone of many tyrannosaurs that lived on Earth for over 100 million years!"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A visual introduction to the recently discovered relatives of the T. Rex also shares profiles of nineteen additional dinosaurs, including seven new species, while discussing their characteristics, including feathery coats, that have surprised the scientific community.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A visual introduction to the recently discovered relatives of the T. Rex also shares profiles of 19 additional dinosaurs, including seven new species, while discussing intriguing characteristics, including feathery coats, that have surprised the scientific community.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

This book highlights a newly discovered T. rex relative in China with a coat of downy feathers! This one-ton predator is the largest known animal to ever have walked the Earth. This discovery was made public in April 2012, and is a timely addition that sets this book apart from other dinosaur titles. We meet 19 kinds of tyrannosaurs--including seven new species discovered in the last two years--that came before T. rex. The names are strange, like Bistahieversor and Zhuchengtyrannus. The creatures were strange, too, and many of the newly discovered ones caught scientists by surprise. Filled with engaging, lifelike illustrations by Xing Lida, Tracking Tyrannosaurs explains to kids how T. rex, the most famous, ferocious dinosaur of all-time was only one of many tyrannosaurs that lived on Earth for over 100 million years!

Review by Publisher Summary 5

This book highlights a newly discovered T. rex relative in China with a coat of downy feathers! This one-ton predator is the largest known animal to ever have walked the Earth. This discovery was made public in April 2012, and is a timely addition that sets this book apart from other dinosaur titles. We meet 19 kinds of tyrannosaurs--including seven new species discovered in the last two years--that came before T. rex. The names are strange, like Bistahieversor and Zhuchengtyrannus. The creatures were strange, too, and many of the newly discovered ones caught scientists by surprise. Filled with engaging, lifelike illustrations by Xing Lida, Tracking Tyrannosaurs explains to kids how T. rex, the most famous, ferocious dinosaur of all-time was only one of many tyrannosaurs that lived on Earth for over 100 million years!