2nd Floor Show me where

618.392/Heineman
0 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 618.392/Heineman Due Apr 17, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York City : Feminist Press at the City University of New York 2014.
Language
English
Physical Description
302 pages ; 21 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781558618442
1558618449
Main Author
Elizabeth D. Heineman, 1962- (-)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

When Heineman (Before Porn Was Legal), a professor at the University of Iowa, became pregnant at age 45, she and her partner Glenn opted for a home birth with a certified nurse-midwife, expecting an uneventful delivery of her second child. In the first pages of this riveting memoir, however, something goes terribly wrong during the labor process, and readers are carried along on a frightening wave of events leading to a stillborn birth. Thereupon, Heineman analyses every decision and turn she took from conception to gestation to delivery and beyond. In so doing, she not only probes her own grief, but gives life to the very child she has lost. Courage was required to write this raw story, and it also takes some to follow along with Heineman as she brings her embalmed baby home from the funeral parlor and reads to him. She also examines the practices of midwives and hospital physicians while scouring her memory for any mistake she (or her caregivers) may have made. As Heineman admits, "there is nothing happy about a dead baby. Not beginning, not middle, not end." Her story reveals the depths of emotional pain associated with stillbirth and reveals that parental love has no boundaries. (Mar.) [Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Ghostbelly is Elizabeth Heineman's personal account of a home birth that goes tragically wrong—ending in a stillbirth—and the harrowing process of grief and questioning that follows. It's also Heineman's unexpected tale of the loss of a newborn: before burial, she brings the baby home for overnight stays.Does this sound unsettling? Of course. We're not supposed to hold and caress dead bodies. But then again, babies aren't supposed to die.In this courageous and deeply intimate memoir, Heineman examines the home-birth and maternal health-care industry, the isolation of midwives, and the scripting of her own grief. With no resolution to sadness, Heineman and her partner learn to live in a new world: a world in which they face each day with the understanding of the fragility of the present.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

You may not think you have assumptions about motherhood and grief, but you do. And this book will shatter them.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Ghostbelly is Elizabeth Heineman’s personal account of a home birth that goes tragically wrong—ending in a stillbirth—and the harrowing process of grief and questioning that follows. It’s also Heineman’s unexpected tale of the loss of a newborn: before burial, she brings the baby home for overnight stays.Does this sound unsettling? Of course. We’re not supposed to hold and caress dead bodies. But then again, babies aren’t supposed to die.In this courageous and deeply intimate memoir, Heineman examines the home-birth and maternal health-care industry, the isolation of midwives, and the scripting of her own grief. With no resolution to sadness, Heineman and her partner learn to live in a new world: a world in which they face each day with the understanding of the fragility of the present. In this courageous memoir, Elizabeth Heineman “illuminates the complex emotional landscape of stillbirth—putting into frank and poetic words the unspeakable experience of simultaneously grieving and mothering a baby who has died” (Deborah L. Davis).Ghostbelly is Elizabeth Heineman’s personal account of a home birth that goes tragically wrong—ending in a stillbirth—and the harrowing process of grief and questioning that follows. It’s also Heineman’s unexpected tale of the loss of a newborn: before burial, she brings the baby home for overnight stays.Does this sound unsettling? Of course. We’re not supposed to hold and caress dead bodies. But then again, babies aren’t supposed to die.Interwoven with her own accounts of mourning, Heineman examines the home-birth and maternal health-care industry, the isolation of midwives, and the scripting of her own grief. With no resolution to sadness, Heineman and her partner learn to live in a new world: a world in which they face each day with the understanding of the fragility of the present.