How the meteorite got to the museum

Jessie Hartland

Book - 2013

"This nonfiction book for elementary-school-age children details the steps that brought a meteor from outer space, across the eastern US, to the roof of a car in Peekskill, New York, and thereafter to be verified, tested, and exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History. Hartland breaks down complex actions and processes in kid-friendly terms and includes pages of fascinating meteor details"--Provided by publisher.

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Subjects
Published
Maplewood, NJ : Blue Apple 2013.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
1 v. (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 30 cm
ISBN
9781609052522
1609052528
Main Author
Jessie Hartland (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

This companion book to Hartland's How the Sphinx Got to the Museum (2010) and How the Dinosaur Got to the Museum (2011) opens with a class field trip, but it quickly backtracks when a student asks how a meteorite got to the museum. On Friday, October 9, 1992, a four-billion-year-old meteor entered Earth's atmosphere over Kentucky, streaked across the skies along the East Coast, and crashed through the trunk of a teenager's car in Peekskill, New York. The police examined it, firefighters cooled it with water, a geologist identified it, the museum's curator of meteors obtained it, a cosmologist discussed it, and the exhibits team displayed it. Through a combination of narrative text, speech balloons, and cumulative lines using the familiar "This Is the House That Jack Built" pattern, Hartland infuses the dynamic story with human interest as well as easy-to-absorb information. Illustrated with eye-catching paintings in a vivid, naive style, this picture book adds another dimension to Hartland's fine Got to the Museum series. Copyright 2013 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Having previously explained how Egyptian and prehistoric artifacts arrived in museum displays in How the Sphinx Got to the Museum and How the Dinosaur Got to the Museum, Hartland goes for a hat trick. This time, a science teacher traces a meteor's billions of years spent in space before it entered Earth's atmosphere (thereby becoming a meteorite) and eventually landed near Peekskill, N.Y., in 1992. Hartland reprises the cumulative structure of the earlier books; after the meteorite crashes into a red Chevy Malibu, police arrive to investigate the meteorite "discovered by the teenager, recorded by sports fans, spotted by Virginians, and howled at by the dog as it bolted toward the Earth." A geologist later confirms the meteorite's legitimacy, and the meteorite comes to find a (partial) home at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City (the aforementioned teenager went on to sell slices of the meteorite to other buyers, as well, an afterword notes). Exuberant typography, playful paintings, and accessible prose all help Hartland's account make an impact. Ages 6–9. Agent: Brenda Bowen, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Nov.) [Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Review by PW Annex Reviews

Having previously explained how Egyptian and prehistoric artifacts arrived in museum displays in How the Sphinx Got to the Museum and How the Dinosaur Got to the Museum, Hartland goes for a hat trick. This time, a science teacher traces a meteor's billions of years spent in space before it entered Earth's atmosphere (thereby becoming a meteorite) and eventually landed near Peekskill, N.Y., in 1992. Hartland reprises the cumulative structure of the earlier books; after the meteorite crashes into a red Chevy Malibu, police arrive to investigate the meteorite "discovered by the teenager, recorded by sports fans, spotted by Virginians, and howled at by the dog as it bolted toward the Earth." A geologist later confirms the meteorite's legitimacy, and the meteorite comes to find a (partial) home at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City (the aforementioned teenager went on to sell slices of the meteorite to other buyers, as well, an afterword notes). Exuberant typography, playful paintings, and accessible prose all help Hartland's account make an impact. Ages 6–9. Agent: Brenda Bowen, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Nov.) [Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 2—Employing the cumulative narrative style used in How the Sphinx Got to the Museum (2010) and How the Dinosaur Got to the Museum (2011, both Blue Apple ), Hartland explains how the Peekskill Meteorite traveled from space to Earth, eventually finding a permanent place in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The artwork has a naive, folk-art quality, reminiscent of the work of Simms Taback and Grandma Moses. The attractive, colorful illustrations will appeal to children. Back matter includes information on Dr. Mark Anders, the first scientist who viewed the meteorite in Peekskill, and additional facts about meteorites. This engaging work is well suited for reading aloud or for budding geologists, scientists, or curators. As the Common Core State Standards place increased emphasis on nonfiction for young students, this groundbreaking effort fits the bill and does it well.—Ellie Lease, Harford County Public Library, MD [Page 114]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"This nonfiction book for elementary-school-age children details the steps that brought a meteor from outer space, across the eastern US, to the roof of a car in Peekskill, New York, and thereafter to be verified, tested, and exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History. Hartland breaks down complex actions and processes in kid-friendly terms and includes pages of fascinating meteor details"--Provided by publisher.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Details the steps that brought a meteor from outer space, across the eastern United States, to the roof of a car in Peekskill, New York, and thereafter to be verified, tested, and exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A nonfiction book for elementary school-aged children details the steps that brought a meteor from outer space, across the eastern United States, to the roof of a car in Peekskill, New York, and thereafter to be verified, tested and exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

It came from outer space! This science-as-entertainment book chronicles how a meteorite came to the American Museum of Natural History.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

It came from outer space and crashed onto bookshelves! This third entry in the award-winning Got to the Museum series traces how a rock broke from its billion-year orbit to fall from space onto the trunk of a teenager's car, then to several natural history museums.

Review by Publisher Summary 6

It came from outer space and crashed onto bookshelves! This third entry in the award-winning Got to the Museum series traces how a rock broke from its billion-year orbit to fall from space onto the trunk of a teenager's car, then to several natural history museums.