Braiding sweetgrass

Robin Wall Kimmerer

Book - 2013

"An inspired weaving of indigenous knowledge, plant science, and personal narrative from a distinguished professor of science and a Native American whose previous book, Gathering Moss, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi,... as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation." As she explores these themes she circles toward a central argument: the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgement and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the world. Once we begin to listen for the languages of other beings, we can begin to understand the innumerable life-giving gifts the world provides us and learn to offer our thanks, our care, and our own gifts in return"--

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

508/Kimmerer
2 / 9 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Checked In
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 19, 2022
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 19, 2022
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Checked In
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 27, 2022
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 24, 2022
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 18, 2022
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 27, 2022
2nd Floor 508/Kimmerer Due Oct 18, 2022
Subjects
Published
Minneapolis, Minnesota : Milkweed Editions 2013.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
x, 390 pages ; 23 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 387-388).
ISBN
9781571311771
1571311777
9781571313355
1571313354
Main Author
Robin Wall Kimmerer (-)
  • Planting Sweetgrass
  • Skywoman Falling
  • The Council of Pecans
  • The Gift of Strawberries
  • An Offering
  • Asters and Goldenrod
  • Learning the Grammar of Animacy
  • Tending Sweetgrass
  • Maple Sugar Moon
  • Witch Hazel
  • A Mother's Work
  • The Consolation of Water Lilies
  • Allegiance to Gratitude
  • Picking Sweetgrass
  • Epiphany in the Beans
  • The Three Sisters
  • Wisgaak Gokpenagen: a Black Ash basket
  • Mishkos Kenomagwen : The Teachings of Grass
  • Maple Nation: A Citizenship Guide
  • The Honorable Harvest
  • Braiding Sweetgrass
  • In the Footsteps of Nanabozho: Becoming Indigenous to Place
  • The Sound of Silverbells
  • Sitting in a Circle
  • Burning Cascade Head
  • Putting Down Roots
  • Umbilicaria: The belly Button of the World
  • Old-Growth Children
  • Witness to the Rain
  • Burning Sweetgrass
  • Windigo Footprints
  • The Sacred and the Superfund
  • People of Corn, People of Light
  • Collateral adamage
  • Shkitagen: People of the Seventh Fire
  • Defeating Windigo
  • Epilogue: Returning the Gift.
Review by Choice Reviews

As she did with her John Burroughs Medal-winning Gathering Moss (CH, Nov'03, 41-1549), Kimmerer (SUNY-ESF) brings to this volume her expertise as a botanist, insights developed as mother and a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and beautiful writing. As the title suggests, she braids together diverse threads of experience and knowledge to create a unified vision of humans interacting with other "people"--animals, insects, plants--in "regenerative reciprocity." Kimmerer's environmentalism is grounded in science, including a graduate study confirming traditional knowledge that carefully harvesting sweet grass for basketmaking helps the plants grow. Most of the book's anecdotes and observations are centered in the countryside near Syracuse where the author lives. She explains eutrophication, through which a pond becomes a marsh becomes a meadow becomes a forest, and her efforts to reverse the process to provide a swimming pond for her daughters. She describes late-night excursions to carry salamanders across a dangerous road, pondering questions about long- and short-term aid. Braiding in stories from the Onandaga people and close studies of human and plant communities, Kimmerer skillfully demonstrates the urgency for and the benefits of ecological restoration. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. General Readers; Lower-division Undergraduates; Upper-division Undergraduates; Graduate Students; Researchers/Faculty; Two-year Technical Program Students; Professionals/Practitioners. C. A. Bily Macomb Community College Copyright 2014 American Library Association.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Kimmerer (environmental & forest biology, State Univ. of New York Coll. of Environmental Science & Forestry, Syracuse) was awarded the 2005 John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing for her first book, Gathering Moss. In these beautifully written essays, she explores the natural world, wedding the scientific method with the traditional knowledge of indigenous people. Kimmerer herself is a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Bringing together memoir, history, and science, she examines the botanical world, from pecans to sweetgrass to lichens to the three sisters (corn, beans, and squash), also describing moments of her past, such as boiling down maple sap to make syrup with her children. She shares her efforts to reclaim her culture through studying the language and learning to weave baskets. Intertwined throughout is the history of the injustices perpetrated against indigenous people and the land. Kimmerer writes of investigating the natural world with her students and her efforts to protect and restore plants, animals, and land. A trained scientist who never loses sight of her Native heritage, she speaks of approaching nature with gratitude and giving back in return for what we receive. VERDICT Anyone who enjoys reading about natural history, botany, protecting nature, or Native American culture will love this book.—Sue O'Brien, Downers Grove P.L., IL [Page 114]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

With deep compassion and graceful prose, botanist and professor of plant ecology Kimmerer (Gathering Moss) encourages readers to consider the ways that our lives and language weave through the natural world. A mesmerizing storyteller, she shares legends from her Potawatomi ancestors to illustrate the culture of gratitude in which we all should live. In such a culture, "Everyone knows that gifts will follow the circle of reciprocity and flow back to you again... The grass in the ring is trodden down in a path from gratitude to reciprocity. We dance in a circle, not in a line." Kimmerer recalls the ways that pecans became a symbol of abundance for her ancestors: "Feeding guests around the big table recalls the trees' welcome to our ancestors when they were lonesome and tired and so far from home." She reminds readers that "we are showered every day with gifts, but they are not meant for us to keep... Our work and our joy is to pass along the gift and to trust that what we put into the universe will always come back." (Oct.) [Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on "a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise.""--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

“I give daily thanks for Robin Wall Kimmerer for being a font of endless knowledge, both mental and spiritual.” —RICHARD POWERS, NEW YORK TIMES

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A New York Times BestsellerA Washington Post BestsellerA Los Angeles Times BestsellerNamed a "Best Essay Collection of the Decade" by Literary HubA Book Riot "Favorite Summer Read of 2020"A Food Tank Fall 2020 Reading RecommendationUpdated with a new introduction from Robin Wall Kimmerer, the special edition of Braiding Sweetgrass, reissued in honor of the fortieth anniversary of Milkweed Editions, celebrates the book as an object of meaning that will last the ages. Beautifully bound with a new cover featuring an engraving by Tony Drehfal, this edition includes a bookmark ribbon and five brilliantly colored illustrations by artist Nate Christopherson. In increasingly dark times, we honor the experience that more than 350,000 readers in North America have cherished about the book—gentle, simple, tactile, beautiful, even sacred—and offer an edition that will inspire readers to gift it again and again, spreading the word about scientific knowledge, indigenous wisdom, and the teachings of plants.As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.